38 Special’s Don Barnes: Fostering The Spirit of the Underdog

first_imgIt was back in the early 80’s, and the guys in 38 Special knew they had played to packed houses in the Northeast before, so why not play the huge Brendan Byrne Arena in New Jersey’s Meadowlands? I mean, they had a couple hit records and some hot FM radio singles like “Hold On Loosely” and “Caught Up In You” under their belt, so their confidence was brimming. But as band co-founder and sole survivor Don Barnes tells it, their management and handlers didn’t share the band’s belief they could fill the big venue.“They were all like, ‘You don’t really want to go in there and embarrass yourself, ‘cuz you might get like half house,’ ” Barnes said recently from the road, a place he knows well after 40 years out on it. “We kept thinkin’ that we have been back there so many times, we really feel like they would come out and see us. And they thought ‘Well, it’s your funeral, we’re gonna advise you against that, you might want to play a smaller venue, ‘ but we were pretty stubborn about it, and kept saying ‘No, we can do it.’ And buddy, let me tell ya, 24,000 people came out there, and they had to eat their words. That’s one of the cherished memories of up and coming, to finally reach that pinnacle.”It’s around 35 years later, and 38 Special has pretty much gone the way all the other big Southern rock bands have gone — except maybe the Allman Brothers — where arenas are no longer on the itinerary. But as with many of their counterparts, the baby boomers that showed up at the big gigs back then are still rabid fans today who love hearing the music of their youth, so packed clubs, theaters and festivals are still the order of the day, like the fifteen or so thousand who showed up at a recent outdoor show in Illinois. The last remaining member left from the original lineup, Barnes founded 38 Special with childhood pal and former 38 Special lead singer Donnie Van Zant while living in Jacksonville in 1974. Van Zant is the younger brother of the legendary Ronnie Van Zant, who fronted Lynyrd Skynyrd until his death in a plane crash in 1977, and the older sibling of Johnny Van Zant, who would eventually take over for Ronnie and who sings with Skynyrd today.“We grew up on the same street (as the Van Zants), when I was a kid,” the affable Barnes said. “Three guys who ended up in 38 Special also lived on Woodcrest Road. It was a big four lane road, and when we were young, our parents wouldn’t allow us to go on the other side of Woodcrest, that’s where the Van Zants lived. There were over there on the ‘bad side of town,’ the wrong side of the tracks kinda thing.”Barnes saw his buddies in Skynyrd slowly climbing their way towards success, so he and Van Zant decided they would give rock and roll a shot too. And the camraderie with the guys in what would become Skynyrd was a key component in Barnes learning the rock and roll ropes.“I was right there in the middle of all this history being made,” Barnes continued. “Ridin’ my bike to go to (Lynyrd Skynyrd guitarist) Allen Collins‘ house when I was 13 years old, him having some European English import records, and we’d sit down and we’d pick out guitar licks, and he would show me a few things. I mean, this was (one of the guys) who wrote “Free Bird” eventually, ya know. He would have a big Vox Super Beatle amp in his hallway and he’d just be rattling the windows when his Mom would come in from work, and she’d be so proud of her son. My mother would never let that happen in my house. And Ronnie, he was four years older and a big mentor as well for us.”Being a navy town, Jacksonville was full of venues the sailors would frequent on leave, and it gave budding young Southern rockers ample opportunities to play live and hone both their performing and songwriting chops.“They had four naval bases there,” Barnes said, “so all of us kids, I mean from Duane Allman and Gregg Allman to Ronnie Van Zant, everybody played the sailor’s clubs. We were fifteen years old making a hundred bucks a week, that was big money for a fifteen year old kid. There we learned the foundations, the structures of the craft of songwriting, playing the hits of the day, radio songs, and you realized it was a craft, there was a system to it where you have the A section and a B section and then a ramp that goes up to the chorus, and then the bridge and that kind of thing. You learned the structures at an early age. And then we’d get cocky and think, ‘Oh well I can write my own songs now.’ And that’s when you go starve for ten years.”Barnes and Van Zant played in “like, fifteen bands before 38 Special” and then began to pick up the stronger guys from other local groups as they began to focus on their big dream.“It started like any band, you play in somebody’s garage and get the cops called on you for playing too loud. But you really tried to get guys who would commit to it. Skynyrd was kinda just taking off and we thought that we were really gonna be serious about it. But it was hard, we all had day jobs too. I wouldn’t recommend it to many kids today, because you work so so hard, and there are no guarantees, and you can give 110% and still not make it. But it does build character, I guess.”After conquering the local bar scene, 38 Special sucked it up taking warm up slots often on three act bills playing mostly to alot of yet-to-be-filled chairs, but to their major credit, they played as if their lives depended on it, keeping the standards high no matter what the crowd was. And it turned out that being humble and working hard was well worth the effort.“We tried to act like we were the headliner, ya know like God help who was following us, we tried to throw it all down at ’em, so hopefully they would go home and tell somebody. Just keeping that high standard. We felt like if we got a couple of sentences at the bottom of the review the next day, you know it’d say, ‘Peter Frampton did blah blah, and Gary Wright did this, and 38 Special delivered a lively set at 7 0’clock,’ we thought wow, that could mean something! But it never really did.”Along with the Van Zants, Barnes and his 38 Special boys, and the Allman Brothers, Jacksonville was also a rock and roll breeding ground for the likes of former Eagle Don Felder, Stephen Stills and in nearby Gainesville, Tom Petty, among others. So what was it about this Florida navy town that made it a mecca for young soon-to-be rock superstars?“People ask what’s in the water down there, I don’t know,” Barnes said. “But I’ll tell ya, comin’ from the west side of Jacksonville, it’s pretty much no man’s land, you either end up drivin’ a truck or goin’ to prison or something. I really think there’s a thread of that underdog spirit, ya know, that comes from not being from New York or L.A. so you really gotta show your stuff to people, you gotta put it in their face, get out there and make your statement. I think that’s what the underlying aggression, the big strong guitars, ya know, “Listen to me!” You’re there screamin’ at people, basically to pay attention, because you’re not fashionable, you’re not from a hip place. I think that common thread of the underdog spirit is what is prevalent with all those people.”After two middling albums in the mid-70’s kept the band a relative unknown outside of the South, 38 Special shifted into more of an arena-style Southern rock sound and got some attention in 1980 with their third effort Rockin’ Into The Night, but it would be their next two albums Wild Eyed Southern Boys (1981) and Special Forces (1982) that would vault them up onto that elusive next level of stardom. Two Barnes-penned and sung singles, “Hold on Loosely and “Caught Up In You”, were the lightning in the bottle that got them that coveted heavy FM radio airplay and seats began filling in arenas. But Barnes is quick to point out that the road to making it is long and arduous, and can sometimes temper the success.“It’s such a long road, and it’s tiny baby steps at a time, and when things started happening, you’re a little bit anxious about it all because you worked so hard for so long. It took a lot longer than we thought it would, ya know, we’d do interviews and people would ask, ‘How do you feel now that you’ve made it?’ and we were just so weary. Our management was always about pushing forward, saying don’t be complacent, because there are bigger things to get. If I had to do it all over again, I’d try to enjoy myself a little bit more. Because it was always about push push push all the time, there were times when we’d do nine months of a tour to promote the record, then you’d have to do another record, but you have no songs written, not one note, and you’re so burned out from the road.”Barnes left the band in 1987 — “It had been ten years of absolute pushing and I was worn out”– and had a solid solo album done and ready for release, but it never saw the light of day, becoming a casualty of the sale of A & M Records. It was a crushing blow for Barnes: “I went on vacation after that, I said I’m going to the islands somewhere, and I did.” He eventually rallied and rejoined 38 Special in 1992, and has been the driving force and band anchor ever since. “I picked up right where I left off,” he said. “There were no ill feelings. Once we lit it all back up, it was all back, the formula was there. We kept going onward and upward, ya know.”What keeps Don Barnes — or any of his fellow Southern rock survivors for that matter who are still out there banging away four decades later (like Henry Paul with the Outlaws, Doug Gray with the Marshall Tucker Band and Gary Rossington with Lynyrd Skynyrd) — still working hard out there on the road, playing dozens of shows a year to adoring fans, after all this time? It’s all about using the emotion of the songs they remember to create an experience for those fans, and giving them something special every night.“I guess it’s that instant reaction in people’s faces,” Barnes said. “These songs have a history all their own, so when we go out there, we take the crowd up, up, up up and they are just manic at the end because we’re unfolding all the history from the beginning. We’re there to make sure they have the greatest time. We see ’em singing along, giving each other high fives, clapping and yelling, and we also see tears in someone’s eyes if a song reminds them of something or someone. And you see these kids, they’ve learned about all the songs through games and stuff. That is the fuel right there, seeing something you created from that long ago, that after all the scratching and all the suffering, it really worked out OK. You really mean something to these people. It really is special to us.”last_img read more

Dallas Cowboy Football Star Battles Domestic Violence

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreJason Witten, the Cowboy tight end superstar, is seeking to break the cycle of family violence by encouraging male mentors to volunteer in domestic violence shelters, be positive role models for women and children, and coach boys on how to treat girls.Witten’s mother thankfully fled from a violent household, taking Jason and his two brothers with her.As an adult, Witten established the SCORE foundation four years ago to fund education programs and building projects. His 2011 domestic violence prevention program called “Coaching Boys Into Men” launched in high schools across Arlington, Texas this year to train coaches to educate their players on the dangers of dating violence.Over the holidays, he brought his team’s quarterback to help deliver Christmas cheer and gifts to all the transitional families in the local shelter.(WATCH the Making a Difference video from MSNBC)last_img read more

‘She took advantage of every day’: Friends, Notre Dame community members remember Valeria Espinel

first_imgCourtesy of Carlos Fabrega Valeria, left, and Olivia.Once she got to campus, Valeria and her friends she’d met in the Notre Dame Latino community would hang out every day.“We studied a lot together and [did] basically everything [together],” first-year Augusto Simons said. “We were always together with her. She was very close to all of us. She was a great friend. … She had a lot of friends.”Although her friends said the Latino community at Notre Dame is a very welcoming one, they noted Valeria had a special ability to make friends quicker than anyone else.First-year Nico Lopez counts Valeria as his first friend at Notre Dame.“She was friends with everyone. I mean, it’s kind of impressive,” Lopez said. “I was a little bit jealous because she would become best friends with everybody. … Every single day I would meet another person who would say, ‘Oh, yeah, you’re friends with Valeria.’”According to her friends, Valeria put as much work as she did making friends into school as well.“You can define her, basically, as a work hard, play hard type of person. She was always in every plan she could go to, and she would always seek out to hang out with people and to meet new people and to build new friendships,” Simons said. “But she was also extremely responsible with school. She was always on top of every class, she would help us with our classes we were having trouble with, she was very responsible with all her homework. She was like the perfect student, basically, because she was a very all-around person.”With that seemingly unlimited resource of time, Valeria pushed everyone around her to be better.“She was one of the most well-rounded people I’ve ever known. It was like she had an unlimited resource or resource of time, … like she had so much time, but she had the same time as us. She got so much done in the same time as we did. And she helped us catch that pace and become better versions of ourselves,” Lopez said. First-year Lorena Colon, who became friends with Valeria before they arrived on campus, echoed Lopez’s sentiments.“She just made everyone feel good. And she would never bring anyone down. She really cared about all her friends, and finding that balance between studies and having fun. I think she didn’t want to sacrifice like one for the other,” Colon, her roommate, added. “She would always push you to be a better version of yourself.”One of her friends, first-year Juan Alvaro, remembers when Valeria would go out of her way to remind him to do his work.“Something really special she used to do for me is that I’m very prone to falling behind in classes, especially Moreau. So after she found out [that] I started to fall behind in Moreau for the second time, she would always remind me even though her Moreau wasn’t the same day as mine,” he said. “She would always text me Monday nights and be like, ‘Hey, do your Moreau.’”Valeria met her best friend Olivia prior to arriving at Notre Dame, and by all accounts, they were inseparable.“They were always together,” Simons said. “It was very common to hear in the sentence, ‘Valeria and Olivia.’ They came together, basically. Like they were always together.”“Every single picture, it was Valeria and Olivia. Everything they did, they did together. It was very impressive for us how they became so close through Zoom and how they really made such a strong friendship,” Lopez added.Many of Valeria’s Notre Dame friends were able to meet her friends and family from home in Ecuador through video chats, and Valeria remained extremely close with her parents and three younger brothers while at school.“I think we could all agree that she brought up part of Ecuador with her, and we all got to live a little bit of it through her,” Alvaro said.After Valeria’s death, friends from Ecuador wrote and sang an original song for her called “Little Miss Perfect” that now has over 8,000 views in an Instagram post. The song professes Valeria “always cared for everyone else,” and she “never let life bring [her] down, those were the things she lived by.”According to the song, Valeria was called “little miss perfect” growing up.Although she only was enrolled at Notre Dame for a short time, Valeria made it clear to her friends that she loved Notre Dame.“I remember that she talked to me about her decision making, and she was accepted into a large number of selective institutions. But she never flinched about choosing Notre Dame because she felt like it was going to be the place where she will not only become a better student, which she already was, but she would become a better person,” Lopez said. “I think that she was striving more to become a better person more than a better student because she was already an amazing student. She was pushing her academics even farther. But Notre Dame does a very good job of forming you as a person. And I think that she really felt connected to that.”Her friends remember her as always taking advantage of every opportunity in life and for her quirks, some of the things that made Valeria, Valeria — an obsession with tuna, her baking business she began in quarantine and being a self-admitted easy crier are just a few. But above all, they remember Valeria as being so happy with the life she’d made for herself in the Notre Dame community.“She was the happiest here that she’s been in her life. She was constantly telling us that she was very happy here and that Notre Dame was everything that she ever wanted and more. And her parents knew that, her friends knew that,” Lopez said. “I think that we all thank the Notre Dame community as a whole for having given Valeria such an amazing place to be, even if it was not for the longest of times.”Following Valeria’s death, her friends found agreement in one specific thing about her life, something they want to emulate going forward in their own lives.“When I was talking about this with our friends,” Colon said. “The one thing we agreed on is that she definitely enjoyed her time here and lived as fully as she could, even though it was a very short amount of time. That’s what we were talking about. We were like, ‘We should try to live as fully as she did.’ Because she really did make the most out of her time here.”Tags: obituary, Olivia Laura Rojas, Valeria Espinel Courtesy of Lorena Colon Valeria Espinel celebrated her birthday on campus with a gathering planned by her best friend Olivia Laura Rojas.But somehow it seemed as if Valeria found the time to “meet everyone” in the Latino community within just two months of starting college, get ahead in school and plan for internships as just a freshman. Her friends say she made more friends than they ever thought possible in two months.A native of Guayaquil, Ecuador, Valeria lived in Badin Hall until she was killed in a car accident in October, along with her best friend Olivia Laura Rojas.According to Badin Hall rector Sr. Susan Sisko, Valeria always “bounced down the hallways.”Valeria’s Badin Hall resident assistant, Grace Kaiser, said she “had an effortless confidence and liveliness” that anyone could sense after meeting her.“Val used to give me and everyone in our section these sweets called Dulces de Leche that she brought for us from Ecuador. She would leave a whole stack of them in the candy bowl outside of my room for all to share. Before the campus-wide prayer service, we as a Badin community had a short service for Valeria at the Grotto. Pretty much our entire dorm community and even some off-campus Bullfrogs showed up, which I think is a testament to how loved Valeria is and how much she will be missed,” Kaiser said in an email.Through Zoom calls, GroupMe messages and Facebook groups, Valeria made friends with fellow first years as soon as she could. Many of her friends she hung out with every day throughout the semester she made before stepping foot onto Notre Dame’s campus in the fall. To Valeria Espinel’s friends, it seemed like she had an unlimited amount of time. That she could do everything productive for school and more and still have time to be there for her friends. Almost like she was working with an extra few hours more than anyone else.People say freshman year of college is hard. That it’s hard to find a balance between meeting new friends, doing school work and adjusting to a new environment — adding in a pandemic can’t make it any easier. last_img read more

19 of the Best Fort Leonard Wood Restaurants (2021 Edition)

first_imgIntroductionIf you are new to Fort Leonard Wood, you are probably looking for easy food options as you settle in. During a move, it’s often convenient to just go with fast food, but here you can find some other options both on and off post. Take a look at these affordable suggestions if you need some help. Be sure to ask your new neighbors for top restaurant recommendations as you get to know the area better.Know what you’re hungry for? Click the links below to go straight to the information.(1-5) American Restaurants on Fort Leonard Wood(6-8) American Restaurants near Fort Leonard Wood(9-12) Mexican Restaurants near Fort Leonard Wood(13-16) Italian Restaurants near Fort Leonard Wood(17-16) Asian Restaurants near Fort Leonard WoodSuggested Read: Fort Leonard Wood Missouri: In-Depth Welcome Center19 Fort Leonard Wood RestaurantsDue to ongoing coronavirus concerns, it is best to confirm restaurant hours and restrictions before you go.American Cuisine1. Morelli Heights Bar & GrillAddress: 3404 Nebraska Ave., Bldg. 3210 Fort Leonard Wood, MO 65473Phone number: 1 (573) 329-6005At Morelli Heights Bar & Grill located on post, you can find well-priced portions of wings, nachos, and fries. They also have burgers and beers and an outdoor seating area.2. Ozark TavernAddress: Bldg. 492 North Dakota Ave. Fort Leonard Wood, MO 65473Phone number: 1 (573) 596-0001The Ozark Tavern is a casual dining sit-down restaurant on post. You can enjoy beers on tap and a full bar while you catch the game on one of their big screens. Fully Ozark themed decor creates a nice, comforting atmosphere to sit and relax in. Check out their Ozark Tinis and other specialty drinks!3. Sandwedge EateryAddress: 18694 FLW 26, Bldg. 10221 Fort Leonard Wood, MO 65473Phone number: 1 (573) 329-4770You can find the Sandwedge Eatery inside the Piney Valley Golf Course. They have great daily specials such as Mondays’ French Dip or Fridays’ Reubens, and $3 domestic beers!4. Strike ZoneAddress: 7077 Illinois Ave, Bldg. 1609 Fort Leonard Wood, MO 65473Phone number: 1 (573) 596-1498Strike Zone is inside the Daugherty Bowling Center, so you can enjoy food and snacks while knocking down pins. They have great daily specials like a $6.25 pork basket on Wednesdays. If you want to feed a big group in a social setting you’ll want to check this place out. They have more than enough room to accommodate plenty of friends and family!Restaurants Near Fort Leonard WoodAmerican Cuisine5. Randy’s Roadkill Bbq & GrillAddress: 12670 State Rt E Rolla, MO 65401Phone number: 1 (573) 368-3705Don’t be put off by its name. This local gem is tucked away, and may be a little hard to find, but is well worth it. Patrons love the rustic decor and friendly staff. Try their brisket and ribs in a two meat combo with coleslaw and mac n’ cheese.6. Carnivores Meats & DrinksAddress: 220 Marshall Dr. Ste 5, Saint Robert, MO 65584Phone number: 1 (573) 451-2090This place is for, you guessed it, meat lovers. Rustic but friendly, this local spot off post in Saint Robert is a reliable place for solid barbeque fare. Try their tri-tip and signature sauces.7. Cookin From ScratchAddress: 90 Truman St Newburg MO 65550Phone number: 1 (573) 762-3111Cookin’ From Scratch is located about 40 minutes north of post near Doolittle. It is an award winning restaurant that prides itself on making everything from scratch using only the freshest ingredients. They have burgers, sandwiches, steaks, and desserts!8. Callies Finger FoodsAddress: 878 Missouri Avenue 4 Saint Robert, MO 65584Phone number: 1 (573) 451-2447A local shop with really good prices, the favorite at Callies is the Chicago style hot dog. This place is friendly, conveniently located, and really useful for a quick bite.Mexican Cuisine9. Route 66 Taco CompanyAddress: 946 Missouri Ave. Ste 1, St. Robert, MO 65584Phone number: 1 (573) 232-1399Route 66 Taco Company is not your typical taco joint. They use special blends of fresh, quality ingredients to keep your taste buds stimulated. Check out their lava burrito or their wham bam shrimp tacos.10. Cancun Mexican GrillAddress: 690 Missouri Ave St. Robert, MO 65584Phone number: 1 (573) 336-8585Though a long way from its namesake, Cancun Mexican Grill is a local favorite in Saint Robert. They offer free chips for every table and have a robust menu with something for everyone. Check out their seafood enchiladas or their warrior chimichanga.11. Los Arcos Mexican Food & Tequila BarAddress: 1212 E State Rte 72 Rolla, MO 65401Phone number: 1 (573) 426-4388If you’re on the hunt for street style tacos, look no further. At Los Arcos, you can find a generous menu and great service. They have over 50 types of tequila as well! Try their fresh guacamole and chicken chimichangas.12. El Jimador Mexican RestaurantAddress: 220 Marshall Dr. Ste 6, Saint Robert, MO 65584Phone number: 1 (573) 336-7555Locals love El Jimador, with its tasty menu items and a super friendly staff, you can’t go wrong here when looking for solid Mexican fare. Fan favorites include their steak fajita plates and margarita specials.Italian Cuisine13. Tk’s PizzaAddress: 743 Missouri Ave. Saint Robert, MO 65584Phone number: 1 (573) 336-3278At Tk’s Pizza you’ll find hand tossed pizza for everyone. They have a 20 inch pizza for the really hungry, or a 10 inch cauliflower crust for the carb conscious. Check out some of their most popular pies including the buffalo chicken, chicken bacon ranch, and pepperoni pizzas.14. Pryor’s Fresh PizzaAddress: 100 N Bishop Ave., Rolla, MO 65401Phone number: 1 (573) 364-1293Pryor’s has been around since 1964, and their time tested flavors will not disappoint. Try their plain cheese or deluxe pizza that has had people coming back for years!15. Alex’s Pizza PalaceAddress: 122 W 8th St., Rolla, MO 65401Phone number: 1 (573) 364-2669At Alex’s Pizza Palace, you can sit down for a nice meal, or call in an order and bring a pie home. They have more than just pizza, so be sure to check out their other Italian classics like lasagna and chicken parmigiana.16. Cellar 66 Restaurant and Wine BarAddress: 115 N Benton St., Waynesville, MO 65583Phone number: 1 (573) 528-7675If you’re looking for a nice date-night spot, try out Cellar 66 located in the heart of Waynesville. Locals often start off with their meat and cheese plate. Ask the wait staff for good wine pairings as you explore their menu.Asian Cuisine17. IchibanAddress: 240 Marshall Dr. Ste 8, Saint Robert, MO 65584Phone number: 1 (573) 336-5036Meaning number one in Japanese, Ichiban is a local go-to for sushi and Asian fare. Check out their various specialty rolls or, if sushi is not your thing, their hibachi lunch specials.18. Cafe KoreaAddress: 839 VFW Memorial Dr. Ste 9, St. Robert, MO 65584Phone number: 1 (573) 336-3232Located right outside of post, Cafe Korea is a family restaurant serving authentic Korean and some Chinese cuisine. Try their beef bulgogi or their really filling bento lunch boxes!19. Glassico SushiAddress: 198 Old Rte 66, Saint Robert, MO 65584Phone number: 1 (573) 336-3877At Glassico Sushi you can get more than just sushi. They have Japanese fried chicken, fried dumplings, poke bowls, and a creamy vegetarian ramen.ConclusionSo there you have it! Begin your adventure with some of these time tested spots, and in no time, you will find your go-to spots! Explore your new area, make friends, and ask them for recommendations too. Good luck and bon appetit!The appearance of U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement.last_img read more

EB17: Token builds a better wheel with fewer pieces, Zenith takes to the road,…

first_imgThe wheels also feature their Z1 hubset which has been designed with wider flanges and bearing spacing for a better performing wheel. The hubs feature tool free end caps on the disc brake compatible version so you can run multiple thru axle or QR options.Available in rim brake only, the Konax Tri will sell for $1,699 a set. This year at Eurobike, Token was very excited about their new rims. Lumped into the Zenith family, Token claims that they were able to create a stronger rim by limiting the number of carbon plies in the layup. It’s not that they’re using any less carbon, it’s that they’re using fewer pieces thanks to a new method of manufacturing they developed which uses a single piece of carbon from bead to bead to create the aero profile of the rim (think one horseshoe shaped piece of carbon, rather than multiple rectangles overlapped). By doing this, the brand claims that there are fewer points of overlap compared to traditional layups which form the weak point of the system. The deepest option, the Konax Tri, is a 76mm deep rim with a 20mm wide internal (27.4mm external). Like all of the Zenith rims, the Konax Tri is tubeless ready using a 3M rim tape that carries a 150psi rating. Dropping down to the Konax Pro, this rim measures 52mm deep with the same 20/27.4mm width and OAD (Optimized Aerodynamic Design) profile. The last wheel in the series is the Ventous with a 36mm deep profile, and 20/27.4mm width. Both of these wheels are available in rim brake versions with the high end Z1 hubs with Token TFT Hybrid Ceramic bearings for $1499 (Ventous) and $1599 (Konax Pro), but they’re also available in a disc brake version without the TFT bearings.The disc brake versions will come with a more common straight pull, Centerlock disc hub that fits 12mm thru axles but includes a QR adapter. Since the hubs are less expensive, the wheels drop a bit in price to $1299 for the Ventous, and $1399 for the Konax Pro. In development for more than 3 years, the brand is finally ready to bring what they call Conti-Fiber to market with three different rim profiles.center_img Finally, Token had this little Push’n-Turn carbon steerer expander which is quite light at just 19g. Yes, there are others that are lighter, but at just $25, the Token model will be hard to beat in terms of price. Safe for any steerer from 22-25mm, aluminum, steel, or carbon.tokenproducts.com A new wheel that’s not a part of the Zenith line but still features Conti-Fiber construction, the Roubx takes aim at the growing gravel market. Pretty wild in its design, the two photos above are actually of the same wheel, just different sides.If the green is a bit much, there’s also a more subdued grey option. Running a 33mm deep, 25.3 internal/31.2mm external hookless carbon rim, the Roubx also includes an asymmetric spoke bed and is tubeless ready. Offered in a number of hub configurations with their D1 hubs, the wheels ship with tubeless tape and valves for $1299.last_img read more

Vermont Folklife Center receives $33,750 to research grassroots agriculture

first_imgThe Vermont Folklife Center announces the receipt of a $33,750 Archie Green Fellowship Award from the American Folkife Center at the Library of Congress to conduct ethnographic and oral history research into contemporary grassroots agriculture in the state. The Archie Green Fellowship was established by the American Folklife Center to stimulate innovative research projects documenting occupational culture in contemporary America.Farming has held a central role in the culture and economy of Vermont since the colonial period. The current explosion of small-scale, grass-roots agriculture in the state draws on this long history, mixing historical approaches and perspectives with contemporary ideas, needs and goals. At the same time, these efforts also involve the adoption of new ideas and approaches that were never part of past agricultural practice in Vermont or the region.Although the Vermont Folklife Center Archive has extensive holdings on Vermont agriculture across the 20th century, these new, emerging models of agricultural practice are an under-documented aspect of the culture of the state. Support from the Archie Green Fellowship Program allows the Vermont Folklife Center to undertake the “The Grass-Roots Food Movement in Vermont: Documenting New Models of Locally-Focused Agriculture in the State” project and fill this hole in the record of the folklife of Vermont.“In Vermont prior to the Second World War practically all food—with the exception of white sugar, flour, coffee, tea, and spices—was locally produced,” states Vermont Folklife Center Co-Director and Director of Education, Greg Sharrow. “contemporary efforts to re-localize food production tie our state’s agricultural heritage to innovative ideas and new approaches that can keep small scale farming economically viable and help us answer the question: ‘can we feed ourselves?’”The Fellowship was established to honor the memory of Archie Green (1917-2009), a pioneering folklorist who championed the establishment of the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. As a scholar, Green documented and analyzed the culture and traditions of American workers and encouraged others to do the same.For additional information on the “The Grass-Roots Food Movement in Vermont: Documenting New Models of Locally-Focused Agriculture in the State” project, please contact the Vermont Folklife Center at (802) 388-4964.The Vermont Folklife Center’s mission is to broaden, strengthen, and deepen our understanding of Vermont and the surrounding region; to assure a repository for our collective cultural memory; and to strengthen communities by building connections among the diverse peoples of Vermont.last_img read more

Governor Scott says sexual harassment training now mandatory for all state employees

first_imgVermont Business Magazine Today, Secretary of Administration Susanne Young issued a directive(link is external) requiring all executive branch employees participate in sexual harassment training classes offered through the State of Vermont Department of Human Resources (DHR). In response to the national dialogue around the prevalence of sexual harassment, Governor Phil Scott called on DHR to review the State’s sexual harassment policies and procedures and recommend any necessary changes. Policies were found to be current and in line with best practices, and the Department identified an opportunity to improve training requirements to increase effectiveness.“What we’ve seen and heard about the prevalence of harassment and assault from many across the country is disappointing, and it is clear we must all take a strong stand against this abuse,” said Gov. Scott. “I appreciate the work of our agency and department leaders in ensuring the state is vigilant in protecting its employees.”The directive requires all state employees to take sexual harassment training, which will be provided by DHR through the Center for Achievement in Public Service (CAPS). The training, Preventing and Addressing Sexual Harassment, is designed to educate state employees on how to identify, prevent, and address sexual harassment issues in the workplace.“Ensuring a safe work environment for all employees is the top priority of our Department, so the Governor’s leadership on this issue is appreciated,” said DHR Commissioner Beth Fastiggi. “We will offer as many courses as necessary to complete this task, and have already scheduled 400 trainings across the State over the next year.”“Everyone in state government, from frontline workers to Cabinet members, has a critical role in maintaining professional and respectful work environments,” stated Susanne Young, Secretary of Administration. “Providing this training to all employees in a classroom setting, rather than online as it is today, will undoubtedly enhance the experience and promote healthy and civil discussions.”This directive to state employees is in addition to requirements for the Governor’s appointed staff to attend training relating to sexual harassment at least annually, as detailed in an updated Executive Code of Ethics(link is external) Governor Scott issued earlier this month.Source: Governor 12.22.2017last_img read more

United Community Services of Johnson County honors Stratton as Citizen of the Year

first_imgBrad Stratton, center, with UCS Executive Director Julie Brewer and Board Member Tom Robinett.Overland Park’s Brad Stratton on Friday was named the 2016 United Community Services of Johnson County Citizen of the Year.Stratton, the CEO and President of Overland Park Wealth Management, has been long involved in community organizations. In addition to serving as Chair of the Overland Park Chamber of Commerce, Stratton is a member of the Shawnee Mission School Board. He’s also an active member of Village Presbyterian Church.Other recipients of UCS’s 2016 Human Service Awards were:Judge Stephen Tatum, who received the Distinguished Public Service Award.The Strengthening Families Program partners, a group of 21 organizations that work to improve family life in Johnson County, who received the Excellence in Community Service award.Ben Craig, the former Metcalf Bank president who was a driving force behind the establishment of Johnson County Community College and the Overland Park Chamber of Commerce, was recognized posthumously with the Karen Wulfkuhle Bridge Spanner Award.last_img read more

JWLA will host annual reception

first_imgJWLA will host annual reception September 1, 2006 Regular News JWLA will host annual reception The Jacksonville Women Lawyers Association will host its Annual Opening Reception September 6 at The Cellar Grill at the Jacksonville Landing from 5:30-7:30 p.m.The cost is free for JWLA members and $15 for nonmembers. For more information contact Rita Mairs at rmm@pd4.coj.net or (904) 630-1512.last_img read more

Oscar psychology: Why celebrities fascinate us

first_imgToday:From the Oscar’s red carpet to the tabloids lining supermarket checkout lines, celebrity obsession is everywhere. Even the most casual moviegoer might find him or herself flipping through a slideshow of Academy Award fashion after the big event. So why do we fixate on celebrities?In most cases, it’s perfectly natural. Humans are social creatures, psychologists say, and we evolved — and still live — in an environment where it paid to pay attention to the people at the top. Celebrity fascination may be an outgrowth of this tendency, nourished by the media and technology.Read the whole story: Today More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more