For Nontechnical Hires, How Much Stock Is Enough?

first_imgscott gerber How to Meet the Demands of the Socially Conscio… How to Cultivate the Skill of Being a Creative … Guest author Scott Gerber is the founder of the Young Entrepreneur Council.In an early-stage startup, you may not have much in the way of cash to offer new hires. While you’ll often hear advice about how to structure equity for technical hires, deciding how to compensate other key hires—from cofounders to sales staff—isn’t as clear-cut.To help you figure it out, I asked founders from YEC how they figured out what to offer early-stage, nontechnical hires. Their best advice—from considerations to make to equations to use—is below.1. Base It on the Number of Employees You HaveEarly hires are more critical than late hires. Think of your company hires in terms of stages: 1–2 employees, 3–6, 7–15, 16–30, 31–60, 61–150, etc. The amount of equity an employee gets should go down with each stage, because the company is getting less risky to work for, and because you just can’t keep issuing large amounts of equity to everyone at the company. Here’s one system to follow: Employees 1-2 (cofounders) should split the company either 50/50, 67/33, 75/25, or some other reasonable amount. Employees 3-6 should get between 1 and 5 percent of the company in equity, while employees 7–15 should get 0.5–1 percent. Employees 16–30 should get between 0.25–0.5 percent, and so on. A great company to look to for guidance on this is Buffer, which opened up all its salary and equity calculations. —Mattan Griffel, One Month2. Calculate Based on Your Capital ConsiderationsAssuming you’re starting with no capital, you’re going to grant pieces of your company in order to give incentives to early-stage employees. In my experience, sales and marketing is most often handled by stakeholders when there’s no capital. If sales staff is a requirement of your particular company, revenue-share models can be more conducive with the startup economy so you’re not forced to give away critical pieces of your business before seeking subsequent investment. —Blair Thomas, EMerchantBroker 3. Decide on What You Want Everyone to KnowWe make all compensation, salary, and equity based on the expectation that everyone eventually finds out each other’s numbers. This means that people with similar positions and responsibilities should have the same compensation. Even if a candidate asks for lower equity than their peers, give them the same amount. When they find out that you gave them less equity than a peer, you’ll lose their trust. When we give out offers, we tell candidates that we don’t negotiate because what we offer is prioritizing fairness for the candidate and the rest of the team. New hires have been appreciative of this approach. —Nanxi Liu, Enplug4. Use AngelList to DecideAngelList is a great resource for determining early-stage compensation for non-founders. It shows you how much equity companies like yours in your geographical area are offering employees of various titles, and takes the guesswork out of the process. —Brennan White, Cortex5. Start With an Option PoolThe best way to manage equity for key and strategic hires is through an option pool. Most option pools include total equity in the amount of 10–15 percent, which you’ll need to allocate based on projected hires over the next 24 to 36 months. Once you establish your intended list of hires, you can allocate up to 75 percent of the option pool (leaving wiggle room for negotiation). Generally speaking, technical hires should get more equity than nontechnical hires. However, you may want to break the “technical-hire” rule for superstar nontechnical hires, especially if the hire fills a needed executive or senior-level position. Once you think through your hiring, you’ll be in a better position to allocate your option pool. Note: setting up an option pool will also be helpful should you raise venture capital. —Kristopher Jones, LSEO.com6. Tie It to PerformanceUsing equity in lieu of capital compensation until you are cash-flow positive is normal. The shares should be on a vesting schedule and should be tied to performance and agreed upon by both parties. —Lane Campbell, June7. Keep a Vesting Period in MindIn general, sales and marketing staff tend to get less equity than technical hires with the exception of nontechnical managers and executives. In my opinion, how much equity you give is less important than how the equity will vest. In general, most vesting periods are four years long, though people are experimenting with longer and shorter periods. This means that regardless of how much equity the non-technical hire is given, they will have to stay with the company (not get fired or quit) in order to achieve the full amount of equity given. For instance, if you provide a nontechnical hire with 0.5 percent equity over 4 years, the stock will vest in equal installments of 0.125 percent each year. Vesting periods are critical because they protect the company and create better alignment between the hire and his or her performance over time. —Obinna Ekezie, Wakanow.com8. Base It on How Critical the Hire IsIt’s a two-step process. First, do some research to find the industry benchmark (try AngelList.) Second, you should think critically about how important this particular hire is going to be. For example, in enterprise companies, sales positions becomes very critical for the success of the company. If it is like that, you want to sweeten the deal further. Overall, good companies tend to be more generous with their stock options. —Ashu Dubey, 12 Labs9. Use Equity to Keep Everyone in the GameCompensating those on your team with the success of your business will add extra motivation and drive. Especially early on, you need all hands on deck and everyone moving in the same direction. This includes all aspects of your business, not just technical team members. I leveraged AngelList frequently to assess how much equity to give. Putting in a one-year cliff and a vesting schedule has been critical to keep the team motivated, and gives something to really celebrate when we hit those key milestones. —Kristi Zuhlke, KnowledgeHound10. Quantify and Be FlexibleIt’s a very tricky question with many different answers, depending on who you ask; there’s no single answer, but there are ways to tailor compensation to your company and industry that will serve you exponentially better than listening to general advice. Keep in mind several factors: How big is your equity compensation pool (15 percent, 20 percent, etc.)?How many hires will you be making in the next six months with the current equity comp pool, and what types of hires will these people be (low-level, high-level)?How early is this employee and what kind of salary is this employee getting relative to their industry?How important or unique is this employee compared to other hires? Keep these things in mind relative to your equity pool, and also compare to industry what you come up with as a guideline. —Alec Bowers, Abraxas Biosystems 11. Think in Terms of Dollars, Not Shares or PercentagesYou should have a reasonable expectation of how much your business is worth today and might be worth in a year or two. You can also estimate what additional upside a new hire will need to either compensate for below market comp today, or take on the risk of joining a startup. For example, if the market for a sales person is $65,000 and commission is 10 percent, you can decide how much additional bonus per year they need to join your team ($25,000, $50,000, $100,000). Consider what that might grow into based on your valuation growth (2x, 5x, 10x) to get them to join. Then you can decide if it’s worth giving that up for what they bring in terms of sales growth or lead generation. —Avi Levine, Digital Professional Institute 12. Make Sure Total Compensation Hits Market ValueThere are market rates established for all levels and roles. Target a compensation package within 20 percent of market rate. We’ve had success by offering a menu of three choices, which allows each candidate to choose their mix of cash and equity. Just remember that a well-rounded startup has strong technical and nontechnical people, so don’t treat anyone like a lower-class employee. —Aaron Schwartz, Modify Watches13. Do the MathSlicing up equity should come down to a math equation. Instead of reinventing the wheel, you should use math that other people have invented to figure it out. Y Combinator cofounder Paul Graham puts it together in this simple equation: 1/(1 – n). What it breaks down to is that if “n” is the equity you’re giving up, it’s worth it if it makes the company worth more than 1/(1 – n). Beyond that, I stick to the basics: Have a one-year cliff and four-year vesting for all equity employees. —John Rampton, Due AI Will Empower Leaders, Not Replace Themcenter_img Tags:#compensation#Equity Compensation#Guest Posts#hiring#Nontechnical Hires#recruiting#Stock Options#yec Related Posts How Connected Communities Can Bolster Your Busi…last_img read more

5 Steps for Creating Successful Lead Nurturing Campaigns

first_img Topics: When it comes to effective marketing automation, one of the best steps you can take is making sure your emails are properly set up for lead nurturing success.Here are 5 steps you can take to ensure you generate more customers through a lead nurturing campaign.1. Define Your Audience and SegmentCompanies usually have more than one type of customer. Why do most companies only market to one type of buyer then? In order to set up a lead nurturing email campaign, you first need to know who needs nurturing. Once you’ve defined your ideal customer types, you should then segment them before you start creating campaigns.2. Offer Something of Value First, Not a Sales PitchJust because someone converts on your page doesn’t mean you should jump straight into sending them an email about requesting a quote or a demo. You need to nurture them through the sales funnel first to make them readier to buy. Instead of pitching your product as the greatest thing ever, you should first offer value. Examples of valuable offers include webinars, ebooks, and whitepapers. You don’t have to create new content for your lead nurturing emails — if you have a backlog of content, utilize those assets. If they’ve been successful converting leads in the past, there’s a high chance the leads you’re nurturing will find value in them, too.3. Set Objectives and Goals for Each EmailSo now you know you should be sending content first, not sales quotes. But how do you know what type of content to send? And what should that content’s purpose be? Ultimately, you should be picking offers that will appeal to your chosen audience segment with the intention of moving them further down the sales funnel and closer to the customer stage.A good example of how to do this is in the chart above from one of HubSpot’s customers. Not only do they provide information about their offers and goals for each email, they also include the subject line and CTA they’ll use to entice the reader to accept the offer. This type of chart is a great way to help you organize your campaigns and make sure you’re implementing goals to reach that final step — the sale.4. Set Up a Timeline for Your EmailsYour business has a typical sales cycle, and so should your lead nurturing campaigns. Typically, it’s a good idea to send 2 to 3 emails to your prospects in a lead nurturing campaign. Try to space out your emails accordingly. For example, if your typical cycle runs 30 days, you may want to set up a campaign for emails to be sent out the 1st, 10th, and 20th days after a conversion. With lead nurturing, patience is a virtue. It’s important to remember not to rush into the sale. Instead, let it take its natural course.5. Evaluate Your Success, and OptimizeAs your campaigns run, make sure to experiment with the offers you send, the subject lines, and the calls-to-actions found within the email. There’s always room to improve your campaign. Make sure you take advantage of testing and experimentation to better nurture your leads.Lead nurturing can be ineffective if done incorrectly, but if you put the time into your campaigns and follow these steps, you’ll be more likely to drive more lead-to-customer conversions for your business!How are you using lead nurturing campaigns as part of your inbound marketing strategy? Lead Nurturing Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Oct 11, 2011 11:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017last_img read more

How to Tailor Lead Nurturing Content to Suit Individual Personas

first_imgAccording to Forrester Research , companies that excel at lead nurturing generate 50% more sales ready leads at a 33% lower cost. If this is the case, then why are only 49% of marketers taking advantage of lead nurturing tools , as evident by Loopfuse’s Marketing Automation Study ?One of the main reasons marketers fail to adopt lead nurturing as part of their marketing mix is a lack of content. To effectively execute a lead nurturing program, you can’t exactly have a deficiency in content. You need enough of it in order to keep your lead nurturing emails interesting and relevant at every stage in the sales and marketing funnel, from a lead’s initial discovery of your business all the way through to purchase-readiness.Furthermore, while many of the more basic lead nurturing campaigns focus on delivering content solely by leads’ stage in the sales cycle, the most successful lead nurturing campaigns deploy content specifically tailored to the needs of different marketing personas, too. According to the Aberdeen Group , personalized emails improve click-through rates by 14% , and conversion rates by 10% . But this also translates to a whole lotta content, so it’s no wonder many marketers are hesitant to get started with lead nurturing.But here’s a little secret: you don’t need to create all this content from scratch. If you have even just a general baseline of marketing offers, you can re-work this very content to suit the needs of your various marketing personas and segments, saving you a lot more time and effort than crafting brand new content from scratch. Here’s how to do it right… Identify Your Personas The first thing you’ll need to do is identify your various buyer personas, which serve as detailed profiles of the people who are most likely to make great customers for the products and services you sell. If you don’t already have well-defined personas for your business, that’s where you’ll need to start. Ask yourself the following 9 questions when developing your personas ( we elaborate on them here ):What is their demographic information?What is their job and level of seniority?What does a day in their life look like?What are their pain points?What do they value most? What are their goals?Where do they go for information?What experience are they looking for when shopping for your products and services?What are their most common objections to your product or service?How do I identify this persona?As you’re thinking about these questions, you’ll identify clear distinctions between each persona, and you’ll begin to understand why it’s important to treat each differently in the content/offers you provide them through your lead nurturing campaigns. Using these questions as your guide, create detailed profiles for each of the personas you’ve identified. These profiles will be helpful to reference as you start tailoring the content you have to suit each persona.Depending on your business, industry, and how many different products/services you sell, you may find that you have 1, 2, or 10+ personas (or anywhere in between). Businesses that sell a lot of different products for various target audiences, for example, may identify several very unique personas. And the more personas you identify, the more content you’ll need (sigh).As you complete this exercise, you may even start finding that you can nest specific groups of personas under broader persona categories. But when you’re first getting started targeting your lead nurturing content so you can base campaigns on personas as well as stage in the sales cycle, we recommend you start catering to broader groups of personas first. You can always get more granular as you build up your content arsenal , and it’ll get easier and easier to more closely tailor existing content once you get started. Select Your Best Marketing Offers for Each Stage of the Sales Cycle Lead Nurturing As I mentioned earlier, most of the more basic lead nurturing campaigns are based solely around stages in the sales cycle. The process sounds kind of like this: A lead converts on a top-of-the-funnel offer like an educational ebook , so they get nurtured with similar top-of-the-funnel content. Then, once they’re ready, they convert on a more middle-of-the-funnel offer like a product demonstration, a consultation, or a free trial, thus getting removed from the top-of-the-funnel nurturing campaign and swapped into the middle-of-the funnel campaign to get nurtured by content/offers more appropriate to that stage in the buying cycle. And so on and so forth. Make sense?Most sales cycles can universally be boiled down to 3 distinct stages in the sales cycle: awareness , evaluation , and purchase . You can learn more about each of these stages and how to appropriately map types of lead nurturing content/offers to these stages in this post , but here is a brief rundown:So, in order to have content for each persona to nurture leads in each stage in the sales cycle, you’ll need to identify 3 of your best generally targeted offers for each stage: 1) your best top-of-the-funnel offer (which caters to leads in the awareness stage ), 2) your best middle-of-the-funnel offer (which caters to leads in the evaluation stage ), and 3) your best bottom-of-the-funnel offer (which caters to leads in the purchase stage ).And by “best,” we mean top-performing, so consult your marketing analytics to determine which offer you have for each of these 3 stages has the best conversion rate . For top-of-the-funnel offers, you should be looking at visitor-to-lead conversion rate; for middle-of-the-funnel offers, look at lead re-conversions; and for bottom-of-the-funnel offers, look at lead-to-customer conversion rate. Tweak Content to Cater to Each Persona Once you’ve chosen your 3 general offers, it’s time to tweak them to suit each of your personas. So if you’ve identified 2 personas to start out with, you’ll need to tweak each of your 3 offers for each persona, meaning you’ll end up with 6 separate offers. Whether you’re tweaking a top-of-the-funnel ebook, a middle-of-the-funnel product webinar, or a bottom-of-the-funnel live demo, the following tips as well as the detailed persona profiles you created earlier will help you tailor your offers to suit these individual personas. Cater to the Persona’s Individual Needs, Problems, and Interests Think about that persona’s individual needs, problems, and interests. Is there anything specific they might care about or need a solution for that your offer doesn’t address because it was meant for a more general audience? If so, work these concepts into the content.For example, if you’re a school that provides horseback riding lessons to learners with a variety of skill levels, you may have 3 different types of students — beginner riders, intermediate-level riders, and more advanced riders. If these are your three personas and you’ve identified that your best top-of-the-funnel offer is your ebook on  The 10 Skills Every Horseback Rider Needs , you’ll probably want to tweak this content to cater to the 3 skill levels of your students. If this is the case, the skills that advanced riders need probably aren’t very applicable to skills needed by beginner riders (and vice versa).  Adjust Formatting, Depth, and Length To piggyback off my last point, because different personas will likely have varying interests, the way you present certain information may need to vary. For example, if you’re catering to an advanced horseback rider in your ebook compared to a beginner, that content might lend itself to more in-depth explanation of certain topics than content suitable for a beginner, who may prefer bullet point summaries of the topic. In other words, the way you present your content — in format, depth, and length — may vary depending on the individual persona you’re targeting. Keep this in mind. Modify Language and Tone Another modification you’ll want to make involves changes to the language and tone used in the offer. Do your different personas respond to the same type of language, or do they prefer to be communicated with differently? Do they prefer language that is more formal and professional, or a more informal and casual tone? Are there any variations of the jargon these different groups use to describe similar things?Sticking with our horseback riding school example, let’s say you were tweaking your bottom-of-the-funnel offer, which is a free-20 minute horseback riding lesson. In your lead nurturing email to promote this offer, you’d likely want to tailor your language based on the skill-level of that prospective student. An advanced student, for instance, would probably have a wider knowledge of advanced horseback riding terminology, so it’d be suitable to use this jargon in your email. The language used to promote the lesson to a beginner-level student, on the other hand, who probably isn’t familiar with advanced terminology, would need to be much more basic and novice. Incorporate Industry/Persona-Specific Examples Another thing you’ll want to do is make sure your content/offer is as specifically relatable to each persona as possible. A great way to do this is to incorporate examples that resonate with that particular persona. Does that persona correlate to a specific industry? If so, replace general examples with industry-specific ones to illustrate your points in a more targeted way (or add these examples where there are none). This makes it so the content is even more personalized to the needs, interests, and problems of that particular persona.Let’s refer to our horseback riding school example one last time. If you were creating a middle-of-the-funnel webinar discussing the teaching methodology your horseback riding school follows, and you were targeting an intermediate-level rider, you could include a case study of an intermediate rider who came to your school and, as a result of your methodology and training, became one of the top riders in their division and moved on to compete with more advanced-level horseback riders. Modify Your Lead Nurturing Campaigns Once you’ve tweaked your content/offers based on persona, then you’re ready to start incorporating them into your lead nurturing campaigns! Using your marketing analytics and lead intelligence, determine which characteristics to use to categorize individual leads by persona. By identifying which leads correlate with what personas, you can then use your lead management system to segment them into different lead nurturing campaigns based on their stage in the sales cycle as well as their persona. Congratulations! You now have much more segmented, personalized, and effective lead nurturing campaigns set up. Let us know how they perform! In what other ways can you tailor your lead nurturing content and offers to better suit your individual marketing personas? Image Credit: Hello Turkey Toe Originally published Mar 14, 2012 3:30:00 PM, updated February 01 2017center_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics:last_img read more

11 Simple (But Critical) Tips for Creating Better Landing Pages

first_imgThere’s no question that landing pages — and the lead-capture forms that come with them — are two of the most important elements of lead generation. Without them, marketers would be much more limited in their ability to convert website visitors into leads — and generate reconversions, too.That’s because landing pages enable us to direct site visitors to better targeted pages that have the ability to capture leads at a much higher rate than forms on other web pages.Landing pages also focus your visitors’ attention on one particular offer, limiting the distractions of everything else on your website. Visitors are on a landing page for just one single purpose: to obtain an offer by completing a lead-capture form.But converting visitors into leads, even with landing pages, is much easier said than done. In fact, there are quite a few best practices every marketer should consider when setting up and optimizing landing pages. So to keep you on track, here is your landing page tip list, excerpted from our newest ebook, The 30 Greatest Lead Generation Tips, Tricks & Ideas. 11 Top Tips for Creating Better Converting Landing Pages1) Include All Critical Elements of an Effective Landing PageLanding pages, sometimes also called “lead-capture pages,” are used to convert visitors into leads by completing a transaction or by collecting contact information from them. In order to make these transactions happen, it’s critically important that your landing pages consist of the following components:A headline and (optional) sub-headlineA brief description of the offer that clearly emphasizes its valueAt least one supporting image(Optional) supporting elements such as testimonials or security badgesAnd most importantly, a form to capture visitors’ information Landing Pages Originally published Dec 11, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Topics: 2) Remove the Main NavigationOnce a visitor arrives on a landing page, it’s your job to keep them there. So if there are links on the page that enable visitors to move about your website, you run the risk of distracting them, which creates lead generation friction and increases the chance they’ll abandon the page before even converting. And, let’s face it: No respectable marketer wants that. One of the best ways to reduce this friction and increase your landing page conversion rates is to simply remove the main navigation from the page. Simple as that!3) Match the Headline of the Landing Page to its Corresponding CTA Keep your messaging consistent in both your call-to-action (CTA) and the headline of the landing page. If people click on a CTA for a free offer only to find out there’s a catch on the landing page, you’ll instantly lose their trust. Similarly, if the headline reads differently than the CTA, it might lead to confusion, and the visitor might wonder if the CTA is linked to the wrong page. Eliminate any and all confusion, and make sure your landing page consistently reflects what you promised in your call-to-action — and vice versa.4) Remember: Less Is More Many of you are probably aware of the phrase “keep it simple, stupid.” Apply that same philosophy to your landing pages. A cluttered page usually results in a distracted, confused, and/or overwhelmed visitor. Talk about landing page friction! Instead, embrace white space, and keep the text and images on the page simple and to-the-point.5) Emphasize the Offer’s ValueHighlight the benefits of the offer with a brief paragraph or a few bullet points. The best landing page description offers more than just a list what comprises the offer; it also clearly highlights the value of the offer and gives visitors a compelling incentive to download. For example, instead of “Includes specifications of product XYZ,” say something along the lines of, “Find out how XYZ can increase productivity by 50%.” In other words, emphasize how the offer addresses a specific problem, need, or interest your target audience cares about.6) Encourage Social Sharing Don’t forget to include social media sharing buttons that enable your prospects to evangelize your content and offers. To limit cluttering, just be sure to only include buttons for the social platforms your audience uses. And don’t forget to add an email forwarding option, since people have different sharing preferences. Keep in mind that even if your social media contacts never buy from you, there’s always a possibility that someone in their personal network will!7) Create More Landing Pages to Generate More Leads According to HubSpot’s 2012 Marketing Benchmarks Report,companies see a 55% increase in leads when increasing their number of landing pages from 10 to 15. The takeaway is simple: The more content, offers, and landing pages you create, the more opportunities you have to generate leads for your business. More landing pages also usually means more targeted content that better appeals to your various buyer personas, which can help to increase your conversion rates. To increase the number of landing pages you have on your site, invest in an easy-to-use landing page creation tool, create more offers, tweak the offers you already have to cater to individual personas, and repurpose content you already have. In fact, we elaborate on all of the above in this blog post about why you (yes, you) need to create more landing pages.8) Only Ask for the Information You Really Need You might be wondering how much or how little information you should require in your forms. There is no magic answer to this, but the best balance is to collect only the information you really need to qualify leads. In general, the fewer fields you have on a form, the higher the conversion rate. This is because, with each new field you add to a form, it creates more work for the visitor, and thus fewer conversions. A longer form looks like more work and will often be avoided altogether. On the other hand, the more fields you require, the better quality those leads will likely be, because they thought your offer was valuable enough to warrant a form completion. Essentially, the best way to determine what form length works best for your business is to test it for yourself.9) Consider Whether “To Submit, or Not to Submit?” That is the question most of your visitors are probably asking. That’s why one simple yet effective way to increase form conversion rates is to avoid using the default word “Submit” on your form button. If you think about it, no one wants to “submit” to anything. Instead, turn the statement into a benefit that relates to what prospects will be getting in return. For example, if the form is to download a brochure kit, the submit button should say, “Get Your Brochure Kit.” Other examples include “Download Whitepaper,” “Get Your Free Ebook,” or “Subscribe to Our Newsletter.” Here’s another helpful tip: Make the button big, bold, and colorful, and make sure it looks like a button, which is usually beveled and appears “clickable.”10) Reduce Anxiety With Proof ElementsPeople are even more resistant to give up their personal information now than ever before. It’s understandable, considering all the spam out there. Luckily, there are a few different features you can add to your landing pages to help reduce visitors’ form completion anxiety:Add a privacy message (or a link to your privacy policy) that indicates visitors’ email addresses will not be shared or sold.If your form requires sensitive information, include security seals, a BBB rating, or certifications so visitors know their information is safe and secure.Add testimonials or customer logos. It’s a great way to leverage social proof. For example, if your offer is for a free trial of your product or service, you might want to include a few customer testimonials about that particular product or service. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack 11) Make the Form Appear ShorterSometimes people won’t fill out a form just because it looks long and time-consuming. If your form requires a lot of fields, try making the form appear shorter by adjusting its styling. For example, reduce the spacing in between fields or align the titles to the left of each field instead of above it so that the form appears shorter. If the form covers less space on the page, it may seem as if you’re asking for less. And whenever possible, implement Smart Fields — dynamic form fields that automatically adjust to a shortened version if a visitor has already been entered into your marketing database.What other landing page tips would you share with marketers taking an interest in landing page optimization?Want more lead generation tips and tricks? Download your copy of The 30 Greatest Lead Generation Tips, Tricks & Ideas today.Image Credit: DarrelBirkettlast_img read more

Twitter Introduces ‘Negative Keyword Targeting,’ and Other Marketing Stories of the Week

first_img Originally published Dec 16, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Happy Sunday, marketers! Get ready! We’re about to take you on a little journey through today’s latest marketing updates, which will carry you into 2013 and beyond.Before getting started, let’s make sure you have your 2013 marketing goals in order. What are you hoping to achieve this coming year? Keep in mind, your goals should be Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound (AKA, S.M.A.R.T.). If you need help getting started with your 2013 goals, download this planning template.Next, we’ll show you a few things to look out for in 2013 that may not have been a priority in 2012. As the marketing world shifts, so must you as a marketer.So what do you say, are you ready to see your future? Let’s get started:Twitter Introduces ‘Negative Keyword Targeting’ to Make Ads More Relevant, From MashableTwitter now allows advertisers to target negative keywords for Promoted Tweets. This means, if an advertiser wanted to buy the term “tomatoes,” but didn’t want to receive results about the film review aggregator and forum, Rotten Tomatoes, the advertiser could choose “rotten” as a negative keyword to avoid such results. This will help advertisers drill down on the exact target audience they’re hoping to reach.In addition to negative keywords, Twitter is now leveraging newsjacking on their advertising platform. Promoted Tweets can now automatically match up with trending topics. The example Mashable gave was, “if a celebrity’s pregnancy news starts trending, and you’re a retailer of baby clothing, your Promoted Tweet may be entered into the auction for that trending search.” Suddenly, advertising on Twitter is getting much more relevant, personal, and dynamic. If you’re interested in reading more about Twitter’s latest advertising updates, you can read the full story here.Facebook Makes Getting More Page Likes Easier For SMBs, From Marketing LandJust like Twitter, Facebook has been making some changes to its advertising tool too. There’s now a much simpler way for small businesses to generate more page Likes (yay!). The tool is aimed at businesses with fewer than 10,000 page Likes, since this is where the majority of SMBs tend to fall. Essentially what you see as a SMB inside the ad unit is a simpler flow, much like when you promote a post currently. As Marketing Land puts it, you’ll see “a subtle but key element of the pre-populated UI is the estimated number of Likes that advertisers will get in exchange for their budgets.” Basically, the more you spend, the more Likes you get. This new ad update applies to both PC and mobile versions of the Facebook newsfeed. Interested in learning more about this new update for SMBs? Read the full story here.How to Run a Last-Minute Holiday Campaign Using PPCThe holidays are approaching so quickly! What’s a marketer to do? Consumers are searching left and right for last minute deals online, but SEO is an investment over time, which means you won’t see results immediately. I assure you, there is a solution. To add a little spice to the SERPs and earn some quick wins for your marketing team, try pay-per-click (PPC) ads. You’ll rank, users will click, and everyone will be happy. PPC will also help you with your organic search terms in the long-run because you can then identify which keywords were searched for most by the people who clicked on your ads. That sounds like another big win if you ask me! To learn exactly how to run a PPC campaign to give your company a boost this holiday season, you can read the full article here.Email, Social, and Mobile Are Marketers’ 2013 Budget Priorities, From MarketingProfsWhat are your marketing priorities for 2013? In which programs do you plan to increase your spend? According to MarketingProfs, “55.5% of marketing executives say they plan to increase spending on email campaigns in 2013, 51.8% plan to boost spend on social media, and 42.8% plan to up their spend on mobile marketing.” Trailing not far behind is SEO/PPC at 39.8 percent, and lower down on the list includes advertising, tradeshows, and direct mail. So what does this mean for marketers? Well, essentially, Inbound for the win! If you’re already leveraging inbound marketing, you’re way ahead of the game — congratulations! If you’re not already leveraging inbound marketing, you might want to get started. Let’s call it your marketing resolution for 2013. To see what other marketers are planning for 2013, check out the full story here.35 Free Pre-Designed Email TemplatesIt’s obvious that marketers are finding great value from email marketing, especially based on the 2013 budget projections above. Another piece we’ll be seeing more frequently in 2013 is visual content. So what happens when you combine the two? You get 35 free pre-designed email templates to help you craft emails that nail both form and function. These email templates can be installed right into your current HubSpot account, through a free trial of HubSpot’s email tool, or you can use the raw HTML code in your current email service provider (ESP). Of course design is important, but not many marketing teams can hire a designer to beautify every single email that gets sent. That’s where pre-designed templates come in. If you’re interested in downloading the 35 free email templates mentioned above, you can access them right here.November ComScore Data Suggest PC Search Volume May Have Peaked, From Search Engine LandAs 2013 rolls around, it’s important to think about the future of marketing, and the agility of your own company to quickly pick up and adapt to new features, functions, or best practices. One of the functions you might really want to keep an eye on is SEO. As mobile/tablet usage continues to grow, SEO continues to change. Search Engine Land puts it bluntly, “Smartphone-based queries and lookups are cannibalizing PC search to some degree.” They are suggesting that PC search volume may have reached its peak. Do you agree with this discussion? If this is the case, what will you do in 2013 to adapt to the new rules of SEO? If you’re interested in seeing more data related to PC search queries, you can read the full story here.What do you expect to see from the world of marketing in 2013? Are there any marketing trends or predictions you’re keeping a close eye on once the new year rolls around? Share your thoughts in the comments below!Image credit: darinrmcclure Topics: Keyword Optimizationlast_img read more

Awards Season is Here! Help HubSpot Pick the Nonprofit of the Year

first_imgAs reported by Network for Good, 30% of annual online giving will occur this month and 10% will occur the last three days of the year. In the spirit of the biggest and most exciting month for nonprofits, the HubSpot Nonprofit Program is excited to announce our first annual “Nonprofit of the Year” award nominations!The organizations on this year’s list are all small nonprofits nominated by HubSpotters, and we’d love your voting participation.Voting will be open to over a million of our social followers until December 22, and the winning organization will be granted a free one-year subscription to our Nonprofit Advantage product, so that we can do the inbound marketing work for them!There are thousands more NPOs that we’d put on this list if we could. We are so inspired by the amazing work these organizations all do each and every day. Click to see the 2013 nominees and help us pick the winner!As a part of Nonprofit of the Year nominee announcement, we’ve included our favorite highlights from Charity Navigator’s Top 10 Best Practices of Savvy Donors, along with our own commentary on each recommendation:1) Be proactive in your giving.Charity Navigator says:Smart givers generally don’t give reactively in a knee-jerk fashion. They don’t respond to the first organization that appeals for help. They take the time to identify which causes are most important to their families, and they are specific about the change they want to affect.For example, they don’t just support generic cancer charities, but instead have targeted goals for their giving, such as providing mammograms to at-risk women.HubSpot’s take:Nonprofits that are making it easy for prospective donors to gather information through the natural course of research will win the hearts and support of today’s giving community, especially the newest group of donors: Millennials.2) Hang up the phone and eliminate the middleman.Charity Navigator says:Informed donors recognize that for-profit fundraisers, those often used in charitable telemarketing campaigns, keep a large portion (in some cases all) of each dollar they collect.Wise donors never give out their personal information — like credit card accounts and Social Security numbers — over the phone. If they like what they hear in the pitch, they’ll hang up, investigate the charity online, and send their contribution directly to the charity, thereby cutting out the middleman and ensuring 100% of their donation reaches the charity.Taking it a step further, donors may want to reconsider supporting a charity that uses an inefficient telemarketing approach and instead identify a charity that does not use telemarketing to raise funds. HubSpot’s take:One of the least efficient ways to market is via phone. As donors, we all want to know that the lion’s share of our donation dollars are going straight to the field. This is why it is so easy to feel confident about supporting organizations that practice inbound fundraising.When a nonprofit attracts donors online (organically), that nonprofit is able to shrink its operating budget and spend the rest directly on their mission. 3) Check the charity’s commitment to accountability and transparency.Charity Navigator says:In 2011, Charity Navigator added an Accountability & Transparency dimension to its rating system. It tracks metrics such as whether the charity uses an objective process to determine their CEO’s salary, has an effective governance structure, and has a whistleblower policy.This data is critical because charities that follow good governance and transparency practices are less likely to engage in unethical or irresponsible activities. So, the risk that such charities would misuse donations is lower than for charities that don’t adopt such practicesHubSpot’s take:One of the great things about nonprofit websites and an inbound mentality is that there are no barriers. It’s not about how much money the nonprofit spends disseminating reports to constituents, but about how accessible it for them to search and find. Transparency is easy and free.What tips do you have to share? What do you look for in an organization that you choose to support? Tell us below, and be sure to vote for the Nonprofit of the Year! Originally published Dec 18, 2013 6:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Nonprofit Marketing Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

An 8-Step Plan for Migrating to a New Marketing Automation Program

first_img Marketing Automation Topics: How They Did ItOne challenge Freeman faced was that the people who had installed and configured the previous marketing automation system at ShoreTel were no longer at the company. And the software had been in place since around 2007. “I had to go in and figure out how the whole thing was set up by someone else, with very little documentation on the current setup,” he says.In any migration, there will be some translation required. How much depends on which applications are involved. Some have more in common than others.Freeman offered to walk me through the steps he followed in his migration. The main thing, he says, is to put in the time up front to make a realistic schedule and anticipate the steps that are going to be the most challenging. “Planning is the most important piece,” he says.Here are eight steps he recommends:1) Take inventory.Map out the workflows, lists, contact fields, and content such as landing pages, emails, blog posts and images that you have in your existing marketing automation program. “Just define what you have and what you need to bring over,” he says.2) Do a clean-up.As long as you’re in the middle of change, it’s a good opportunity to get rid of old offers and other assets you don’t need anymore. It’s also a good time to comb through your contacts database and get rid of some email addresses, for example ones that have bounced or ones that have not opened one of your emails in a long time. (For advice on how to scrub your list, see this story.) “Bottom line is, this is an opportunity for spring cleaning,” Freeman says.3) Figure out which assets need to be changed.Identify any adjustments that you need to make in workflows that are being carried over.4) Export your data.“Because it’s a moving target, I set up an auto download or auto data export that ran daily,” Freeman says.5) Put the pieces back together.Start with landing pages and emails. “We took landing pages we had from Eloqua and applied styling and template changes,” Freeman says. “We recreated them in HubSpot, but with a new look and feel.”6) Perform a sync.Sync your contacts with Salesforce.com, and start recreating workflows, lists, and forms.7) Test.“We tested a lot before going live, but we also spent three days after going live with HubSpot looking out for problems, and fixing problems and oversights,” Freeman says. “That’s inevitable. There are going to be little hiccups. But we worked them out and everything was golden after that.”According to folks at HubSpot, you might want to run the old and new systems in tandem for some period of time.8) Shut off the old system.Hey, you don’t need it anymore. You’re done. Congratulations.ShoreTel finished the migration a few months ago, and has had no problems since. “I always find things to tune or improve,” Freeman says, “but things have really gone smoothly.”The PayoffThe biggest benefit for ShoreTel is the new system is easier to use than the previous system. “I have seven people who are actively using this now,” he says. “Every time I do some training, people go, ‘Wow, that’s so easy!’”His one biggest piece of advice to others who are planning a migration is to hire a consultant to help guide you through the process. “You shouldn’t try to do this on your own,” he says. Nobody looks forward to software migration projects. But with the right planning, and realistic expectations, you can get to the promised land without too much damage to your psyche.If you want some advice on how to evaluate marketing automation software, check out this free Marketing Automation Starter Kit. And once you’ve decided to make a leap, you can use this free guide to help you learn how to create marketing automation RFP. Originally published Apr 21, 2014 5:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017center_img This post originally appeared on the Opinion section of Inbound Hub. To read more content like this, subscribe to Opinion.Michael Freeman wasn’t psyched about having to migrate from one marketing automation system to another. But it had to be done. Last year Freeman’s employer, a telecom company called ShoreTel, moved from Eloqua to HubSpot, and it fell to Freeman, the head of demand generation at ShoreTel, to oversee the project.Freeman says he wouldn’t want to go through it again — “I’ve been here for two years, and this was the first time I was ever unhappy,” he says. “Since finishing the migration I’m much, much happier, and if I can help someone else who is in that situation, then I’m happy to help.”Migrations are becoming more common in the marketing automation space. A few years ago that wasn’t the case. The field was so new that when most companies installed marketing automation programs they were starting with a clean slate.But as the marketing automation field matures, an increasing number of companies find themselves wanting or needing to migrate. That might be because they’re dissatisfied with a vendor. Or maybe a company is being acquired and must migrate to the marketing automation program that its new owner uses.Freeman says ShoreTel moved mostly because it wanted greater ease of use, but also wanted to rethink its approach to marketing. He explains his reasons for moving to HubSpot in this video: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

How to Conduct Market Research on a Tight Budget

first_img Conducting Marketing Research You can learn a lot from product failures. In 1982, Toothpaste Brand Colgate decided it would expand its brand by launching Colgate Kitchen Entrees, frozen dinners for the busy consumer. In 2000, Heinz debuted a brand new ketchup — it was purple. In 2005, Pen and Lighter maker Bic entered the market with a new line of disposable underwear for women. Finally, remember the infamous Gap Logo redesign of 2010? Each of these product marketing attempts failed for different reasons, but it’s pretty safe to say that all of them could have benefited from better market research before getting rolled out to the public. When companies develop an idea, whether it’s a new product or a redesigned website, marketing research is often the first thing cut due to time or resource restrictions. It’s understandable. Working with marketing research firms can be incredibly expensive and time consuming. If you haven’t done research before, it can be tempting to skip it and dive right into the development stage.But the truth is, there’s a lot of research you can do on your own and without much budget or training at all. Here are some low-budget ways to factor a research stage into your next project and give your product, idea, or designs much better footing. Click here to get started with our free market research kit.1) Interview Prospects and CustomersCost: $0 – $50Nothing is freer or more valuable than a conversation. We tried this ourselves a few weeks ago — HubSpot invited four customers into our offices to join us for lunch and tell us what they thought of our software.We were pleasantly surprised at how willing and forthcoming they were. Prompted by some questions, they gave us priceless insight into what’s working for them and what’s not in the HubSpot marketing platform. That one conversation spun off a handful of different projects that will make us better as a company.You can’t extrapolate public opinion from four individuals, but you can get a sense of which direction to pursue in future research or your product development. Building an ongoing message-testing program can take some time but it’s entirely achievable. How to Set It Up:How you set up your customer interviews will depend on the kind of company you are. If you are a software company with beta tests running, you can tap that beta group for interview subjects. If not, here are a few ways to find people to talk to:Take to social media: Ask for volunteers to join a conversation to help you shape the next iteration of your website, product or marketing. Tell them approximately how long the conversation will take and any qualifications you have (customer/non-customer, role or industry, etc). Offer a gift card or other reward as a thank you. You only need a handful of people to get worthwhile insights.Ask your customer-facing coworkers: If your company has account managers, support reps, or other staff who work closely with customers, ask them for recommendations of a few who might be willing to give feedback. Include a link in customer communications: Whether it’s a newsletter or an invoice, you can include a call-to-action to provide feedback through a short interview. Offer a small gift certificate or reward for participation. Questions to Ask:You can customize your customer interviews however you want, but here’s a list of common questions you can ask to help you nail your product positioning and understanding of the market, including ones like:What challenges stand in the way of getting your job done?What are your top three headaches right now?How would you describe this product to a boss or client? How would you describe it to your mother?What other types of [product category] have you tried? What were their strengths?In what situation would you recommend us over another company and visa versa?2) Run a Content Strategy SurveyCost: $0 -$50Which is better: ebooks or webinars? Is it worth writing a 20-page ebook when a 3-page tip-sheet will suffice? What makes someone download or read a piece of content? Analytics can help you get at answers to some of these questions, but it’s good to supplement that with direct feedback from your audience.Every few quarters, HubSpot will run a content strategy survey to get a sense of what topics and formats interest our audience. What we’ve found is that our audiences is a living and evolving thing. Your interests change over time and we want to be right there to meet them.How to Set It Up:We teamed up with SurveyMonkey to create a content strategy survey that anyone can use. If you want to run a content strategy survey you can use our template to start and add in questions or tailor it to suit your needs.In addition, if you use both SurveyMonkey and HubSpot you can actually create email segments based on the responses and serve up only the content that matters to each. Regardless of the survey tool you use, below are some of the questions we like to ask about our content strategy.Questions to Ask:How often would you want to receive information from our company?When reading content from companies, which tone do you appreciate? (Select all that apply)When you share information about companies and the products or services they offer, which of the following do you use? (Select all that apply)In what format do you prefer to read your content? 3) Run User Testing on Your WebsiteCost: $0-$50Whether you’re heading into a redesign or maintaining your website through small tweaks, ongoing research into what’s working and what’s not can help you raise the productivity of your site. You can get a lot of information about your site performance from basic analytics about which pages are converting the best or garnering the most consistent traffic.In addition to basic analytics though, there are some free and low-cost tools out there to help you run user testing on your website. These tests will get you feedback on more nuanced elements of your site — things like the design, copy positioning, and/or layout are all great elements to test.How to Set It Up:There are a number of tools out there that you can use to get feedback on your designs or positioning. In the past we’ve used both UsabilityHub and UserTesting.com to help us test out assumptions on our site before a redesign or homepage refresh.Questions to Ask: What is the first thing you look at on this page?Where would you go first if you wanted to take the next step?Is this page trustworthy?How likely would you be to explore this site (rating scale)?Small investments in market research can go a long way in your marketing. In addition to these basic approaches, there are a few tools you can use to research major shifts in buyer demographics or trends, including: FedStats: This site publishes government statistics, like statistical profiles of states, cities, and counties.The Census Bureau: This site gives you access to census data.The Census Bureau’s Quick Facts: This site gives quick facts about people, businesses, and geography.The moral of the story here is that market research doesn’t have to be expensive or time consuming — with the right tools, you can have get great insights in a short amount of time.What other research techniques have you tried on a shoestring budget? Do you have any recommendations for other tools or websites for conducting marketing research? Don’t forget to share this post! 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Thom Yorke, BitTorrent, and Content Marketing’s Magic Moment

first_img Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack These days may go down as the best of times and worst of times for the corners of the internet that are usually too shadowy for the general public.BitTorrent, a peer-to-peer file-sharing protocol that’s been used to power hotbeds for pirated content like Pirate Bay, is relishing the present. Last week, Thom Yorke, the Radiohead front man who is nearly as well known for his pay-what-you-want pricing experiment as he is for his music, issued an announcement that took the music and technology industries by storm: He would self-distribute a solo album exclusively on BitTorrent.Coincidentally, BitTorrent is enjoying a PR coup while other fringe communities, namely the lurid 4Chan and its geeky distant cousin Reddit, have found themselves tangled in controversy surrounding the distribution of intimate photos stolen from celebrities. While Reddit has been turning on itself, others have been so outraged by 4Chan that they’ve orchestrated elaborate hoaxes in attempt to shudder the site entirely. If appealing to the mainstream factored into either site’s growth plan, it could be time to consider Plan B.No such plan is required for BitTorrent. Thanks to Yorke’s win-the-internet announcement, which threatens to cut the middlemen like iTunes and Spotify out of music distribution while simultaneously positioning BitTorrent’s new Bundle product as a way for artists to profit from their work and connect with fans, the public is seeing the technology company in a very different light. Talk about a turnabout for a brand that was once so associated with illegal file-sharing that it blogged in late 2012, “Does BitTorrent = Piracy?” (Spoiler: The answer it gave was, “No.”)Turning Around BitTorrent’s ReputationAnswering common questions isn’t all BitTorrent was doing to turn around its reputation at the time. According to the company’s Chief Marketing Officer, Jascha Kaykas-Wolff, it wasn’t much later that the company began conversations with Yorke, discussions that eventually led to last Friday’s news. Kaykas-Wolff explained that two years ago this Christmas Eve will mark the anniversary of a conversation over tea in London between BitTorrent’s Chief Content Officer (then VP of Marketing) Matt Mason, Yorke, and his management. The two sides enjoyed what Kaykas-Wolff termed “an ideological match” in that they both felt the internet wasn’t helping artists and fans to connect in the way it should.  Yorke and his manager recognized BitTorrent’s potential to distribute recordings directly to fans and not only monetize the transaction, but also give the artist access to everyone who downloaded the files. Eventually, Mason spun up a new product, called BitTorrent Bundle, which Kaykas-Wolff describes as “a record store for the internet generation.” Files can be email-gated or pay-gated. Yorke’s solo effort, Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes, is the first pay-gated torrent.In time, the PR frenzy will subside. It always does. The BitTorrent-Yorke agreement marks a moment that runs much deeper and endures much longer than any news cycle. Simply, BitTorrent has fused its product together with content. “This (partnership) is an absolute form of content marketing. It’s all about supporting the artists and matching it to what the BitTorrent community has said it wants,” said Kaykas-Wolff. And he’s right. The Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes release isn’t entirely unlike a marketing technology company running a popular blog on its own software — it becomes difficult to distinguish the product from the content. And that’s exactly the point.Yet although the BitTorrent partnership is structurally similar to what business-to-business marketers have been doing for a few years, it would have been easy for Mason to have been so blinded by tried-and-true content marketing programs that he could have overlooked the larger opportunity presented by Yorke.When asked about his company’s willingness to “think big,” Kaykas-Wolff responded, “Everyone is following the content model taught by marketing technology vendors. There needs to be room to experiment with different formats, different ideas, and reaching different audiences that you didn’t have access to previously.”So if any marketers are looking to experiment with large, multimedia files in their content mix, I know a popular protocol that’s ideal for distribution. It’s also suddenly a highly trusted brand.Image credit: BitTorrent Originally published Sep 30, 2014 6:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Content Marketinglast_img read more

9 Examples of Extraordinary Infographics From 2014

first_img Originally published Oct 28, 2014 6:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Topics: Infographics This post originally appeared on the Insiders section of Inbound Hub. To read more content like this, subscribe to Insiders.Done right, infographics are powerful tools that marry intuitive design with compelling data. They’re intended to present information quickly and clearly — but often, they fall flat. How do you make sure yours doesn’t? While there’s no specific formula for creating a viral infographic, you can pick up some tips by looking at successful infographics.To help show you what makes a great infographic, here are a few delightful examples from 2014. Some are funny, some more serious, but one thing is for sure: Each of these examples is equally inspiring. From static to animated, interactive to responsive, let’s take a look into some fascinating infographics from this past year.Static InfographicsA common form of infographics today is static infographics. While these pieces aren’t clickable and moveable, they still present a set of data in an easy-to-digest format. Here are a couple of great examples:1) Creative RoutinesUsing data gathered by Mason Currey that compares routines and daily rituals of hundreds of creatives, Info We Trust designed a selection of the creative routines. The differences in routines from creative greats like Beethoven and Dickens are both amazing to know and see visualized.2) 2014 Green Bay Packers Football ScheduleIt’s not a secret that sports and data go hand-in-hand, which is why many sports teams are starting to visualize their data with infographics. Here was a fun infographic take on the Green Bay Packers’ 2014 schedule by Statographics.Animated InfographicsFrom adding subtle animation to an otherwise static piece to creating videos with moving parts, using animation can be a key part in helping illustrate different ideas and data sets.3) 42 Butterflies of North AmericaSometimes simplicity can be key when dealing with visualizing data, as we can see here in this animated chart of butterfly species of North America created by Eleanor Lutz. The moving butterfly animations help add the perfect amount of “life” into this simple and beautiful piece.Interactive InfographicsTo quote our latest ebook, Why Interactive Infographics?, “concise text, precise design and logical graphics assemble to make better sense of raw data. Simple as that. With the internet, we can add now add interactivity to what once were unchanging representations of information.” Here are a few exciting and enticing examples of interactive infographics.4) How Data Travels Around the GlobeThis interactive infographic by Akita explains how data travels around the globe between more than 3 billion internet users. With fun scrolling features and clickable subpoints, it helps make the complicated routes more digestible to grasp for readers.5) From Plaza to BedrockIn 2013, this interactive piece by The National September 11 Memorial & Museum was made to show the backstory behind the construction of the memorial and museum. A new 2014 update to the piece added both audio and video pieces for viewers to interact with as they learn all about the build and design of the memorial.6) SelfiexploratoryThis interesting data project dives deep into the selfie phenomenon and analyzes them by “theoretic, artistic, and quantitative methods.” Viewers can also play with the dataset in the dashboard and see how results change.Responsive InfographicsResponsive infographics both have interactive components as well as the ability to look great on all devices, from a large desktop computer to a phone. Marrying functionality for all with interactive elements? Yes, please!7) How Far is it to Mars?Showing the distance between Earth and Mars as a long, scrolling webpage, this responsive and interactive infographic by David Paliwoda and Jesse Williams examines the huge numbers involved in traveling to our nearest planet.8) World Cup Match BallsWorld Cup fans, this one is for you! This bright and responsive infographic by 150UP showcases illustrations of the official World Cup footballs used every four years since 1930 as well as bonus facts about each year.9) The World of SWISSRather than having a standard FAQ section or press kit for customers wanting more information on the background of SWISS airlines, they created an interactive brand experience featuring a 3D scrolling experience, films, the SWISS fleet and much more.As you can see, 2014 has been a stellar year in infographic content. While this is a sample of the extraordinary pieces of work created this year, it’s a robust look into the forms of showing content in a beautiful and visual way.Want to learn more about interactive infographics? View or download the free ebook, Why Interactive Infographics? Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more