NLEX center Villanueva has MCL tear, likely out for rest of PH Cup

first_imgMainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 “He may be out for two months. Most likely, he’ll be returning in the second conference,” said the fiery mentor.The 36-year-old big man sustained the injury in the Road Warriors’ 99-97 victory over the Alaska Aces last Friday before he underwent surgery a week after.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliStill, Guiao believes that NLEX has enough manpower to cope with the loss of the veteran center with Asi Taulava, Bradwyn Guinto, Raul Soyud, Eric Camson, and rookie Fonzo Gotladera still at his disposal.“We’re not really making it as an excuse or looking at it as a big letdown,” he said. “It’s an opportunity for other bigs to play.” As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Senators to proceed with review of VFA Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND MOST READ Guiao also opted to look at the injury as a way to distribute the minutes to his young big men.“In a way, it’s a blessing because we can spread the minutes to these guys who we want to get more experience and get into the flow of the team.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next PH among economies most vulnerable to virus View comments We are young Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes NLEX big man Enrico Villanueva (14) challenges a shot by Alaska rookie Carl Bryan Cruz (21). PBA IMAGESEnrico Villanueva has been ruled out of the 2017 PBA Philippine Cup after the veteran big man suffered an MCL tear on his left knee.NLEX team manager Ronald Dulatre bared the development, which was confirmed by coach Yeng Guiao.ADVERTISEMENT Compton proud of Aces reserves’ showing in close loss to SMB Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports EDITORS’ PICK Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantinelast_img read more

Innovation/SaaS: As Software Evolves, Where Will it Take Us?

first_imgIt’s hard to keep up with the daily web technology trends and announcements, much less try to extrapolate where things will be five or ten years from now. But Timothy Chou, former President of Oracle on-Demand, tries to do just that in an Informationweek’s Optimize magazine by predicting four lessons for the future of enterprise software.1. Keep it Simple. Google is an example of a company that has become great by keeping their focus and providing a service that is simple and easy to use — information search monetized by targeted ads. Chou sees a future of software composed of very many highly-focused services from many vendors delivered on-Demand.Infrastructure costs will continue to plummet. And platforms like Amazon’s EC2 will make it easy for vendors to deploy on-Demand services. The foundation is in place to encourage the growth of thousands of specialized on-Demand services.On-Demand services will be very low-cost and sold at high volume. Traditional software sold in the range of $100/user/month. Software sold as SaaS is now being sold more on the range of $10/user/month — a drop of a factor of ten. Chou thinks that in the not distant future that those costs will drop by yet another factor of ten.For non-business use we’re already seeing costs plummet to nothing. Google Apps offers an introductory business bundle for small companies that is free. Zoho Office offers database applications, documents, and project planning for free or nominal costs.2. Software as a Commodity. The focus of computers has moved from hardware to software over the years. Chou sees another transition where software becomes more of a commodity and the value to consumers will center on information.3. Business software to become more game-like. Games have historically excelled at state-of-the-art graphic presentations and interactivity. On-line global multi-player games are experimenting with new elements of group collaboration. Business software can learn much from game software capabilities in the areas of graphics and collaboration.4. Software will be more service-based than product-based. Increasingly software companies are relying more on service dollars rather than dollars stemming directly from products. From 1996 to 2005 services revenues grew. For example, Sun Microsystems shifted from 0 to 40 percent, and IBM moved from 30 percent to more than 50 percent.last_img read more

iAMT Scan – Custom Inventory helps with Enterprise Activations

first_imgAMTSetupStatus – Provisioning State of the Management EngineAMTVersion – AMT VersionBIOSVersion – System Bios VersionDate – Date the scan was performedDHCPServer – IP Address of the DHCP Server that lease was obtained fromDNSServerOrder – DNS Search OrderFQDN – Fully Qualified name of the host based on NT/AD DomainDNS_FQDN – Fully Qualified DNS Name for the Host AdapterGateway – Gateway (router) IP AddressHECIVersion – HECI Driver VersionMAC – AMT Capable HOST MAC AddressIPAddress – Current IP Address of Host at time of scanLMSVersion – LMS Driver VersionMake – ManufacturerModel – Manufacturer’s ModelSerialNumber – Machine’s Serial NumberSMSSiteCode – SMS Site the local machine is managed by (if available)SubnetMask – Current IP Subnet MaskSystemName – Host machine nameUNSVersion – UNS Driver VersionUUID – The Systems UUIDProvisionServerPing – Ping status for ‘provisionserver’ DNS entry The identification and activation of vPro systems that are not remote configuration capable and that have not completed the provisioning/activation process prior to being placed in the field can be a daunting task in a large enterprise environment. Especially in the common situation where vPro systems have been deployed before backend infrastructure is in place.To help address this, we created a small utility that leverages MEInfo to capture MEBx details related to activation, and store this data in the Windows registry. This allows for automated inventory methods to collect and report the information enterprise wide, allowing detailed planning of remote activation strategy.The utility requires the same set of prerequistes as MEInfo to produce full detail, such as the HECI drivers to be in place, and Administrator priviledges on the local machine, but is small, silent, and Software Deployment friendly.All of the data that iAMT Scan generates is stored in the local system registry:HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\HARDWARE\INTEL\iAMT SCAN DATAConsisting of the Following String Value Entries: iAMT Scan v.0.3.0 Use Guide: iAMT Scan v.0.3.0 Executable:last_img read more

3 Key Factors For Improving Ecommerce Conversion Rates

first_img Ecommerce Marketing Originally published Sep 14, 2010 9:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 While an ecommerce site will always be focused around driving transactions, capturing the huge non-transacting majority for emarketing presents a major revenue opportunity and marketing challenge. The very best converting ecommerce sites make extensive use of remarketing tools to improve their ultimate transaction rate and retain visitors who are not yet ready to buy. These sites capture visitor information early, use value-added marketing offers, and have unique product page content beyond the boring manufacturer’s same-old template. For ecommerce sites that don’t convert at 18% or better, implementing non-transactional leads can greatly improve their ultimate conversion rate. A poor implementation, however, can lead to an even poorer site conversion rate as traffic is siphoned off the primary ecommerce funnel. There are three critical pieces to a successful implementation of offer-driven lead paths. They are: Call-to-action button Landing page with a form Thank you page Keep reading for implementation and design specifics on these three key pieces.Call-to-Action Buttons That Don’t Cannibalize TransactionsA call-to-action button’s purpose is to capture interest and divert traffic that does not intend to transact immediately. The button itself needs to have specific design and language characteristics to accomplish this goal and not remove people from the primary transactional funnel. Two critical basics of non-transactional call-to-action buttons design on ecommerce sites: Clearly identify the buttons as paths to learning more , not continuing down the purchase path. Visitors will self-select to engage if they are interested but not ready to purchase.  Use messaging like “Looking for more? Download the buyer’s guide to…” or “Need more information before you buy?” to make this crystal clear.If the button is placed as a secondary conversion option in conjunction with “buy now” messaging, it should be less eye-catching than the “buy now” button or messaging .Landing Pages That Capitalize on an Indicator of InterestOnce a site visitor clicks a call-to-action button, they move to a landing page. A landing page is a page with one singular purpose: collect visitor information (a name and email) in return for an asset (a buyer’s guide, ebook, factsheet). As with the call-to-action button, below are 2 critical considerations particular to ecommerce sites: Visitors to your non-transactional landing pages have already indicated interest in downloading the asset and not converting. Take off the sales hat for just a moment ; time to allow visitors to get what they want as simply as possible. That means no “buy now” or product-level messaging and a relatively short form. Briefly express the value of your giveaway to capitalize on the previous indicator of interest from the call to action button click. Recall that visitors to the landing page have expressed that they are not ready to purchase right now and are looking for more information. It’s better to capture their information here than have them defect and buy from a competitor next week.Thank You Pages That Don’t Maroon ShoppersAfter a visitor indicates interest by clicking a call-to-action and completes the form on the landing page, the site needs to uphold its end of the bargain and deliver the asset. The most effective way to deliver the asset is on a dedicated thank you page. On this page, the asset is can be linked along with hooks back into the main site’s funnel. This page may even remain open as people peruse your content, so keeping links back to the main ecommerce funnel may yield some additional utility. Two important elements for thank you pages on ecommerce sites: Keep the first, clearest link on the page for the asset . People have come through the landing page and expect a simple method of receiving their asset. Give it to them.Other links on the page can fall into two categories, depending on your goals. The links can either continue visitors in the “learn more” mode, which they are already in, and link to a blog or other informational assets. Alternatively, if the asset given away on the thank you page helps visitors make a final buying decision, follow-up links can now direct traffic back into the main ecommerce site funnel. Now is the time to put on your sales hat back on and move people back into the product pages, if you like.Putting Non-Transactional Ecommerce Leads in Their PlaceWhen the time comes to make a purchase, would you rather have been in communication with a lead for 2 weeks? Or would you rather they make their own unaided decision to type your site into the address bar? By following the tips above, ecommerce marketers can begin to grow their up-funnel email list and increase customer retention in the critical consideration stage that precedes an online purchase. The best-converting ecommerce sites in the world are doing this already. Photo Credit: Яick Harris Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

What Topic Do You Want To Learn About in HubSpot’s Next Ebook?

first_img Loading… Originally published Jun 2, 2011 11:30:00 AM, updated July 19 2013 Go ahead … don’t be shy!center_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img

5 Simple Steps to an Awesome LinkedIn Company Page

first_imgThe following article is an excerpt from our new ebook, How to Use LinkedIn for Business. To download your free copy of the complete ebook, click here.Last month, LinkedIn launched company updates, making LinkedIn Company Pages more important than ever for businesses. Utilizing a company page can help increase your company reach, increase your business’ product awareness, and generate leads on LinkedIn.That’s why it’s critically important to create a page that is blanketed with great information. A LinkedIn company page is the one page amidst those on your various social networks that calls for the most professionalism. Just as a personal profile is professional in its resume-like nature, yet has a touch of personality through Twitter streams and applications, a company page should emit a white-collar persona paired with some company character. With that in mind, here are 5 steps to complete your company page.1. Include Basic InformationGo to Admintools –> Edit. From there, LinkedIn will prompt you to fill in generic information about your company (a lot of which may already be complete from when you added the company page in the first place). Be sure to fine-tune the description portion, as this will be crucial in user understanding of your company.2. Post JobsThe second tab on a company page is “Careers.” This feature allows you to post job openings at your company. While your company may already have various methods of announcing that you’re hiring, what better place to post a job opening than the very network where many professionals live and explore? Let people know you’re looking for fresh meat to help build what is ultimately defined in your company description.3. Include Products/ServicesLinkedIn can help you showcase your business’ various products/services, so be sure to include them on your company page. Heading to the products tab on your company page, click on the “Admin tools” button again to reveal a new drop down menu—this menu changes from tab to tab.You now have the option to “Add a product or service.” Do it. LinkedIn will take you through simple, step-by-step instructions to help you broadcast those services.4. PromoteUnder the initial overview tab, LinkedIn (under Admintools) allows you to promote your company through an ad campaign. This feature is split into 4 simple steps, which LinkedIn takes you through in a very comprehensible manner. A “Common Questions” box also appears to the right of this page, so you can truly understand how the feature works. A LinkedIn ad campaign could help spread the word about your company as you build and integrate inbound marketing efforts into your business platform.5. Measure EverythingWell, everything provided on your company page, anyway. The fourth and final tab on your company page is “Analytics.” Remember that everything you do with internet marketing involves taking the time to see how those efforts are playing out (this will help you determine whether or not those efforts are worth the time.) The analytics tab will allow you to track page views and unique visitors on your overall page, as well as each individual tab. LinkedIn also measures how many clicks your products or services have received as well as the number of members following your company.In addition, LinkedIn gives percentages for member visits. This tool can be helpful in understanding who your LinkedIn target audience consists of, because the data is split into member visits by industry (marketing, finance, etc.), function (sales, research, etc.), and company (HubSpot, LinkedIn, etc.).Et voilà! You now have a fabulous company profile page—one that can be reached through your wonderful personal page. Now you can start leveraging your company page to be even more beneficial through the use of company updates. Learn how to activate and use company updates here.Is your LinkedIn company page up to snuff?Image Credit: Sheila Scarborough Topics: LinkedIn Company Pages Originally published Nov 7, 2011 11:30:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Inbound Marketing Is About Much More Than Getting Found

first_img Topics: Marketing Automation You are a savvy inbound marketer. You’ve got a killer blog, search optimized content, and an active social media community. The top of your funnel is swelling. And that’s great. But the truth is, you may only have it half right.Inbound marketing initially emerged as a response to the negative impact that traditional outbound marketing methods, like advertising and direct mail, had been having on prospective customers. Tired of being interrupted by irrelevant marketing messages, buyers began driving their own research – taking to search engines and social media sites to get the information they needed to make their purchasing decisions. By prioritizing useful, search-friendly content, inbound marketing provided a welcomed alternative.But there’s a whole other part of inbound marketing that often gets overlooked. The process of initially getting found online and generating leads is critical, but so is understanding and adapting to the needs of your leads after they have expressed an interest in your company. In fact, Gleanster Research found that even when dealing with high-quality leads, only about 50% of them are ready to buy when they first convert. It takes time and tailored communications to bring them to a decision point. Understanding Buyer Interests and Experiences (Lead Intelligence)Sometimes marketers refer to this as prospect or lead intelligence. True inbound marketing should help you gain insight into what first brought prospects to your company and what their end goals are. It should also help you separate out the common experiences of people who end up buying versus general website traffic. To do so, you have to be data-driven. You have to understand not just general trends about your website, but also indicators of the individual customer experience – from the moment they first discovered you, all the way through to their most recent purchase, and beyond.What It Takes:Analytics that tell you which companies and prospects are visiting your site and why.A leads database that includes a history of your leads’ content interests and interactions.Analytics that pull in relevant interactions from social media, email, third-party apps, and other lead-to-company interactions.Adaptive Communications (Lead Nurturing & Marketing Automation)One of the major weaknesses of outbound marketing is that it pummels prospective customers with irrelevant messages they aren’t ready for. The same can easily be true for email marketing campaigns, which is why email marketing campaigns that are part of an inbound marketing strategy should reflect the individual evolving needs of your leads. They should be relevant to the content that your leads have already consumed and where they are in the buying cycle. And while we’re at it, they should sound like a real person wrote them — no more “Greetings… Our records show that you registered…” That’s rubbish. Communications from your company should feel as if they were written expressly for the recipient.  In fact, we’ve found that lead nurturing campaigns with emails that reflect individual interests have a significantly higher click-through rate (CTR) than more generic email blasts. Our research showed that lead nurturing emails generated an 8% CTR compared to the typical 3% CTR of general email sends.What It Takes:Email content designed to inform and engage over time.Messages that are triggered based on lead behavior on your site and across other channels (marketing automation).An email system intelligent enough to stop emailing or shift the communications once a lead has converted.A team member who can write… and relate. Marketing AnalyticsIf inbound marketing starts with getting found and generating leads and continues as nurturing those leads, then the final stop is analyzing the effectiveness of your whole inbound marketing funnel. Understanding which channels and strategies are effectively achieving your marketing goals and which are underperforming will help you improve, iterate, and focus more of your time on what works rather than what doesn’t. Analyzing your marketing also helps you prove your business’ inbound marketing ROI.What It Takes:Website and marketing analytics tools to enable you to track which channels are effectively generating leads, and which aren’t.Closed-loop marketing analytics to understand which leads turn into your ideal customers.Dharmesh Shah, HubSpot’s co-founder, often talks about making marketing that people can actually love — marketing that helps and adds value. That’s the promise of inbound marketing. To achieve that vision, however, your company’s marketing has to focus on the full customer experience, from helping them find you to supporting their unique decision-making process. Getting inbound right takes both.  Originally published Dec 19, 2011 3:15:00 PM, updated October 20 2016 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Everything Email Marketers Need to Know About Sender Score

first_img Email Marketing Originally published Feb 20, 2012 2:00:00 PM, updated October 30 2019 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Email marketing seems like an easy win for your inbound marketing strategy. Write an awesome email, put in some snazzy images, fire it off to your opt-in list, and watch the customers roll in.Even if it all was that easy, though, the step marketers often overlook is just how difficult it can be to actually get your email into a recipient’s inbox in the first place. Seems basic, but there are tons of moving parts involved in email deliverability, and a huge one is the reputation of the email sender. Luckily, there’s a service called Return Path that has a metric called Sender Score, which gives you insight into your reputation as an email sender. Have you checked your Sender Score? If you do know your Sender Score, do you know what it means for your reputation as an email marketer? If you’re interested in your reputation as an email sender, read on to learn everything you need to know about Sender Score.What is Sender Score?A free service of Return Path, the Sender Score algorithm rates the reputation of every outgoing mail server IP address on a scale from 0-100. Gathering data from over 60 million mailboxes at big ISPs like BellSouth and Comcast, Return Path records if people frequently unsubscribe or report spam from certain email senders, and then assigns you a Sender Score based on that monitoring. Your Sender Score will continue to change depending on your email sending habits and the responses of your recipients.It’s a crucial number to stay on top of, because mail servers will often check your Sender Score before deciding what to do with your emails. The lower your Sender Score, the harder time you’ll have getting into someone’s inbox. There are plenty of things that can impact the deliverability of your email, but Return Path reports that 83% of the time an email is not delivered to an inbox, it is due to a poor sender reputation.Even if an email network or ISP doesn’t query your Sender Score to determine whether they will deliver your email, the factors used in determining your Sender Score are similar to those used by email networks and ISPs to determine your sender reputation. As such, the score is a great, free email sender reputation tool to ensure you are aware of and have the opportunity to fix any deliverability problems.How Do I Interpret My Score?To check your Sender Score, visit Return Path’s registration page, and you’ll soon have a report that looks something like this (but with different data, of course!)Scores are calculated on a rolling, 30-day average and represent the rank of an IP address against other IP addresses, much like a percentile ranking. The closer your score is to 0, the worse it is, and if you’re close to 100 like Return Path is in this sample report, well you’re in pretty great shape! Now let’s break down what each of the items you’re being scored on in this report mean:Complaints: How complaints about that IP address compare to all other IP addresses. Complaint rates are calculated as complaints divided by accepted mail, and complaint scores are a rank based on your complaint rates.Volume: While not an indication of a good or bad sender reputation alone, it is an important part of the overall reputation algorithm. For example, an IP address which sends 100 messages and receives 99 complaints is problematic, while an IP address which sends 100,000 messages and receives 99 complaints is probably okay. A higher score equates to larger volume monitored by the Sender Score Reputation Network.External Reputation: How the IP address compares to all other IP addresses on a variety of external blacklists and whitelists.Unknown Users: The rank of the IP address’ unknown user rate compared to all other IP addresses. Unknown user rates are taken directly from incoming SMTP logs of participating ISPs, tracking how often an IP address attempts to send a message to an address which does not exist.Rejected: This represents how often messages are bounced compared to other IP addresses.Accepted: The number of email messages accepted for delivery, this number is expressed as the number of messages seen minus the number of messages rejected.Accepted Rate: The ratio of email messages accepted for delivery compared to email messages attempted. This is the number of messages accepted for delivery, divided by the number of messages seen.Unknown User Rate: The ratio of unknown users, or invalid email addresses, compared to the amount of email seen.So, what’s a good score? If your score is over 90, congratulations! That’s a very good Sender Score. If your score is between 50 and 80, something isn’t right — move on to the next section of this blog post to see what you could be doing wrong that’s impacting your email deliverability. If your score is less than 50, well… looks you’re probably a spammer.What Do I Do If I Have a Bad Sender Score?The first step is knowing, so good job on checking your score. It can take weeks or months to fix a low Sender Score, so the sooner you’re aware of the problem, the better. There are several aspects of your email marketing that you need to check and possibly change to improve your Sender Score and email delivery rates — here are the ones that Sender Score takes into serious account:Inconsistent Volume of Email Sends: See the graph in the top right corner of the Sender Score report? Their email send volume goes up at a pretty steady rate, and as a result, their score maintains a pretty even number. However, if you were to send 5,000 emails on Monday, 200 on Friday, nothing for a week, and then suddenly another 15,000, you would likely get dinged for sending inconsistent volumes of emails.Frequency of Sends: Just as the volume of sends should be consistent, so should the frequency with which you email recipients. Email every day, every other day, every week — whatever your needs are. Just make sure you don’t jump on the email marketing bandwagon, abandon it after a month, then hop back on and expect no deliverability penalties. As you perfect your email marketing machine, you’ll be able to test the optimal email sending frequency for your recipients.Cold IP Address: If you’re new to email marketing, you may have neglected to warm up your IP address. Start email marketing on a new IP address with small batches of the best people on your email list — you know, the ones who love you and won’t mark you as SPAM or unsubscribe from your communications. Progressively increase the amount of people you email to warm up your IP and prove you’re a safe sender.Being Blacklisted: There are about 50 known blacklists out there that denote which IPs are spammers. Return Path has a service that lets you see if you’re on a blacklist. Assuming you’re a legitimate email marketer who just didn’t know some of the rules for good email deliverability, visit the sites of those who have blacklisted you to consult their information for being removed from their blacklist. If you contact them for removal, they will help you understand why you were blacklisted in the first place and what you can do to improve your email marketing methods.Getting Caught in a Spam Trap: A spam trap is an email address that was once valid, but no longer is, and will thus garner a hard bounce notice when you email them. However, when a mail server sees consistent traffic going to the dead email, they can turn the email into a spam trap that will stop returning a hard bounce for the known bad address, and instead accept the message and report the sender as a spammer. The moral of the story here is, if you’re not monitoring your hard bounces and removing them from your active email list, you could be perceived as a spammer.SPAM reports: Finally, if your email recipients think you’re a spammer and identify you as such via a SPAM report, your sender reputation is going to suffer. Check the rate at which your emails are marked as SPAM — an acceptable rate is 1 in every 1000.There are several other factors to getting your email into a recipient’s inbox — the content of your email, email infrastructure, recipients’ personal filtering preferences — more of which you can learn about in this email post about email deliverability. But if you’re looking to start email marketing on the right food, establishing and maintaining a reputable email sender reputation is one of the most important qualities of your email marketing program.Do you know your Sender Score, or have a gauge on how good your email deliverability is?Image Credit: 10ch Topics:last_img read more

Social Media Lead Nurturing Debuts, And Other Marketing Stories of the Week

first_img Topics: Inbound Marketing Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Jun 9, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated March 21 2013 Gather round, inbound marketers. I have a story for you.Actually, I have like 5 stories for you. But I didn’t write any of them — these are the best stories from around the interwebs this week that you may have missed. Which is totally understandable, because holy cow do people pump out a lot of content these days (that’s good though; keep doing that inbound marketers).Without further ado, here are the inbound marketing stories that tickled my fancy this week, and I think will help us all be better inbound marketers. And as always, share your own favorite industry stories with us in the comments!HootSuite Partners With HubSpot to Offer Social Media Lead NurturingI had to start with this one, because it is so cool! We all use social media to generate traffic and leads; we spend time and effort nurturing those leads to become customers; then we rely on closed-loop reporting to tell us how we did. Wouldn’t it be great if all those activities were more integrated though, and you could actually monitor your very own leads’ activity in social media so you can nurture them right then and there? You bet your buttons it would be — which is why we at HubSpot partnered with HootSuite to make that possible. Read more about the partnership in this blog post!LinkedIn’s Security Woes Pour Salt on Social Media’s Exposed Wounds From MarketingPilgrimBy now you probably know about LinkedIn’s security breach in which 65 million passwords were leaked. If not, well, go change your password and then come back.Everything good?Awesome. Frank Reed at MarketingPilgrim took the coverage a step further with an insightful assessment of the state of the social media security union. He believes security is at the crux of social media’s success … and you can read the post to learn why some current social media giants should invest in it lest they meet an eventual demise.Google Finally Takes a Clear Stance on Mobile SEO Practices From Search Engine LandWe’ve talked a lot about the importance of investing in mobile marketing; and I think most inbound marketers are already sold on how critical a strong organic search presence is. This article from Barry Schwartz helps us bridge the gap between the two with his report on Google’s official stance on mobile SEO. It’s not that the topic of mobile SEO hasn’t been covered before — but this time, it comes straight from the horse’s mouth.The 2012 Shopping Behavior Insights Study From Parago Marketers waffle back and forth on what really motivates shoppers to buy. If you have a great brand experience, will that trump cheaper prices from a competitor? Just how much of a role do coupons and discounts play in the buyer’s decision-making process? Their importance may be bigger than you think (they were bigger than I anticipated, at least). Take a look at that and other insights in Parago’s newly published study with data-backed insights on shoppers’ behaviors.Don’t Like Snake Oil? Stop Buying It From SEOmozTo be clear, SEOmoz isn’t selling snake oil. That header is a tad misleading. (On a side note, maybe we should start adding commas into these headings … well, next week is another week.)Now that that’s cleared up, Dr. Pete at SEOmoz comes to the defense of SEOs everywhere who have been given a bad name, usually by people who don’t really know what SEO is. Or, by all those grey- and black-hat people who call themselves legitimate SEOs (tsk, tsk). This post tells everyone who practices SEO how to stop feeding into the stereotype by being well-informed and learning how to work well with clients and bosses who are demanding results in the SERPs.What else happened in marketing this week that we should know about?Image credit: BiblioArchives / LibraryArchiveslast_img read more

5 Key Characteristics Every Social Media Community Manager Should Have

first_imgSocial media is an effective tool to engage your target audience, drive website traffic and, ultimately, boost sales; so why do so few companies employ a social media community manager? You know, the person that manages the whole thing? . Some of our clients even have Tomorrow People presence, as well as many other companies we work with — and they’re all seeing great results from it. So how do social media not . 3) Grows the Network It seems crazy, in the midst of a global financial crisis, to suggest that companies should go to the expense of hiring a community manager to oversee their social media presences. But at our company, By employing a team of full-time and part-time community managers, we’ve cut down on the number of sales people we need to employ because the inbound leads we’re producing are highly qualified. We’re doing the same for our clients, such as LinuxIT and Workbooks; by engaging effectively with communities online, their sales teams are more efficient because they’re receiving far more These tasks detract from the central role, but are all too often lumbered on community managers. Email marketing A community manager isn’t responsible for: do? Twitter 2) Listens to the Buzz Lead nurturing make the leap? This post will tell you everything you need to know about integrating a community manager into your marketing department. Quantity is important to establish reach We have packaged the model into a 5-step methodology we call Zoober: listen, create, engage, transform, grow. This is a process of continuous improvement, where we constantly measure and amend our approach. Our community management team delivers the ‘Engage’ stage of this model — telling people what we’re doing and bringing them to our website. , we apply the lean manufacturing continuous improvement methodology Six Sigma to our internal processes, assuming the leads are the final output. We use HubSpot to measure our traffic and social media engagement. This should include blogger outreach, too — finding the right person to get to know and ask for guest blogging opportunities. You could also consider reaching out to the publications, forums, and Q&A sites your target audience uses. 5) Joins the Conversation and you What are a community manager’s roles and responsibilities? Google+ . Additionally, our average money hiring sales people or in other marketing hires. Develop a process or methodology to ensure you continually improve your social media results each month, and document & review those processes every month. Give your community management team great tools & remarkable content to get the best results. Managing social media communities is a highly skilled, challenging role — which is why we’re amazed how many companies think they can get their intern to do it in their spare time. , but just transfer this step to whatever tool you use — and ensuring profiles are standardized and present the company in a professional light. They should also increase your Facebook fans and What does the community manager Community managers should also investigate the various social media automation tools available, and stay up to date with technology, marketing, and industry news. 4) Distributes Content A good community manager should then grow your networks by engaging every day online (via forums and owned communities) and offline (via events, conferences, and meet ups). They should also, of course, craft status updates, posts, and tweets — because like most of your other marketing channels, social media also depends on sharing excellent content.center_img Originally published Oct 9, 2012 2:00:00 PM, updated October 20 2016 We’ve also noticed that Twitter and LinkedIn contacts. Your community manager should promote your blog and website content to your network. They should help your company foster meaningful business discussions that will allow you to reach your target audience and gain more clients. It’s about dialogues, not monologues. employing a community manager drives approximately 30% more traffic to our website every month It’s definitely worth the effort for us — and we’re sure it could be worth it for you, too! Too many companies don’t bother with social media engagement, or engage with it in an ad hoc fashion. Simply asking your copywriter to tweet every now and again, or getting the intern to update your company LinkedIn profile, won’t cut it; you need people who can focus on this role strategically and consistently to engage your online audience effectively. The benefits are clear — but the process requires a professional. generate more leads , we’ve been developing our community management team and processes to real effect over the past 16 months. I also know that HubSpot invests in employees dedicated solely to managing their no This involves replying to online questions and comments immediately, giving your brand a face, and creating a relationship with prospects. The community manager should represent the client’s voice, but should also be able to get their individual personality across. Especially in blogger outreach, conversation should come naturally to them — they shouldn’t be struggling to find a voice when contacting strangers. A good community manager should listen to the buzz already online — finding out what groups your target audience is joining on LinkedIn, for example, and who they’re following on Twitter. What are they talking about? Who are your rivals? What are they interested in? When are they most likely to read a tweet, or an update? Are they aware of your brand? Who are the key influencers within your industry who you should develop a long lasting relationship with? Marketing strategy quality First, what are the benefits of having a community manager? 1) Sets Up and Manages Profiles Content creation we use HubSpot . You should also remember that while hiring a community manager is certainly an expense, you could visitor-to-lead conversion rate for our B2B clients is 8% Topics: qualified leads sales people, as they sell online: so the community managers are driving their sales directly! Alistair Norman is the Marketing Director of HubSpot’s International Partner Agency of the Year 2012, the UK inbound marketing agency Tomorrow People. Alistair is also an auditor of the MA/MSc programme at Birmingham City University’s New Technology Institute. Follow Alistair on save For us, it has made sense to hire a community management team, but it may make sense for other companies to retain these skills — it’s all about finding people with the right skills and enabling them to develop a community for you in the long-term. Building efficiency into our process to Is it worth it? Where does the community manager role fit? Nothing makes your company look like it doesn’t care like half-filled in, out of date employee and company pages on LinkedIn or Facebook. Our community management team sets up and manages our company and employee social media profiles and groups. This involves setting up the content within our social media publishing tool — Community Management , but your community manager should also focus on creating a larger base of high quality social media fans and followers. A thousand Facebook friends from the wrong industry may not be as valuable as 20 very influential friends with the right connections. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more