DVC Monthly Preview – September 2018

first_imgShare This!Welcome to the September installment of our monthly Disney Vacation Club preview. This month, we discuss an extension for the Epcot member lounge and, in the Resort Spotlight, we’ll take a look at Animal Kingdom Villas Jambo House. Last month, we had news about DVC members being able to enter the Halloween party earlier than other guests (2 p.m. to be exact), and a DVC Explainer on banking, borrowing, and transferring points. You can view last month’s preview here.Booking WindowsThis month, here are some booking window dates to keep in mind. For your home resort (11-month booking window), in September, you will be able to book for dates in August 2019. For all other DVC resorts (seven-month booking window), this month you will be able to book for dates in April 2019.Saratoga Springs Resort is your best bet for last-minute availability, whether you’re using your own points or renting points. Two-bedroom and three-bedroom villas have the most availability, and on certain dates you can still find Treehouse Villa openings. (If you rent points through the affiliate link to David’s DVC rentals, TouringPlans receives a commission.) If you can manage the airfare to Hawaii, Aulani still has limited dates at DVC’s last-minute resort availability page.DVC NewsEpcot’s DVC member lounge.If you’re a fan of the member lounge at the Imagination Pavilion in Epcot’s Future World, good news: It’s returning for another year. It’s a great place to cool off during the heat of the day, with places to sit down, plug in your phone, and enjoy the complimentary snacks and drinks from Coke Freestyle machines. And for kids that need a technology fix, there are gaming stations and tablets available to use.If you blinked, you might have missed it, but a limited-time pop-up shop for DVC members opened within the Marketplace Co-op at Disney Springs. DVC announced the shop, featuring a variety of DVC merchandise and apparel, on August 13 and it closed on September 3. New patterns for Dooney & Bourke handbags and new designs for Member MagicBands were among the items on sale. If you missed it, many items from the collection are available online anytime at ShopDisney.com/DVC, as well as at select merchandise locations at Disney Vacation Club Resorts.Sabrina Soto hosts DVC’s “Behind The Magic” webcast.Disney Vacation Club is encouraging members to watch their latest webcast by offering the possibility of winning a stay at Copper Creek Villas & Cabins at Disney’s Wilderness Lodge. After watching the 24-minute “Behind the Magic” webcast, members are eligible to win a five-night stay in a one-bedroom villa. The prize includes park tickets for four and airfare. The webcast, hosted by HGTV’s Sabrina Soto, features looks at Toy Story Land at Disney’s Hollywood Studios, Pixar Pier at Disney’s California Adventure, and a preview of the Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge lands coming to both coasts. To view the webcast and enter the contest, visit dvcbehindthemagic.com. The webcast is available until September 30.If you missed out on resort guest registration for the Moonlight Magic events at Disney’s Hollywood Studios on September 19, September 26, and October 3, you have another chance to get in on the action. Registration opens to all members at 9 a.m. Eastern time, September 13. Registration goes very quickly, so if you want to attend, plan on being online at 9 a.m. sharp. The final Moonlight Magic event of 2018 will be November 15 at Disney’s California Adventure Park. Registration opens at 11 a.m. Eastern time on October 4.Registration is open for the Disney Vacation Club Halloween Party on October 31 at Disney’s Contemporary Resort. Inspired by The Haunted Mansion attraction, this event features desserts, snacks, and lemonade; character encounters; face painting; DJ music; a selfie station; games; and a keepsake photo. The two times for the parties are from 3-5 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Cost is $30 per person (ages 3 and up). Call Member Services at (800) 800-9800 to book.Resort SpotlightThe Animal Kingdom Villas is actually made up of two side-by-side resorts, Jambo House (which is partially DVC) and Kidani Village (which is all DVC). This month, we’ll focus on Jambo House.A view of the lobby from the fifth floor, where most of the Jambo House DVC rooms are.Jambo House is probably what most people think of when they think of Animal Kingdom Lodge, with its soaring lobby and expansive windows leading out to the savanna. The Animal Kingdom Lodge first opened in April 2001 as a conventional Disney resort. The Lodge’s fifth- and sixth-floor rooms were converted into DVC villas with Animal Kingdom Villas contracts going on sale in June 2007 at $104 per point. Kidani Village would open in 2009.Jambo House has 134 DVC units, comprising 216 maximum available rooms if you were to split the lockoffs. The value studios are 316 square feet and other studios are 365 square feet. Value one-bedrooms are 629 square feet with other 0ne-bedrooms 720 square feet. Value two-bedrooms are 945 square feet with other two-bedrooms 1,075 square feet. Three-bedroom grand villas check in at 2,349 square feet.The value units, which come at a lower point level, are some of the tougher-to-get DVC rooms due to the low inventory. Likewise, Club Level units are also low in supply and very difficult to book, even at 11 months out. Jambo House is the only DVC location at Walt Disney World that has Club Level accommodations. The rest of the units are divided by standard view and savanna view.Giraffes on the Arusha Savanna at Jambo House.The savannas, with giraffes, zebra, Ankole cattle, wildebeest, and other African animals are the big draw for the resort. Many guests refuse to stay anywhere but a savanna-view room. If you’re staying in standard-view room, you can still take advantage of the many viewing areas around the resort to do your animal watching. In the evening, you can venture down to the Uzima Savanna near the pool and find a cast member with night-vision goggles to see the animals at night.The Igbo Ijele mask in the Animal Kingdom Lodge Jambo House.Beyond the animals, you might not be aware of the museum-quality African art and artifacts on display. The resort is home to the largest collection of African art in North America. The centerpiece of their collection is the huge Igbo Ijele mask on display in the lobby. The 16-foot Ijele is created by the Igbo people of Nigeria and used at special celebrations only once every 10 to 25 years. This is the only known Ijele outside of Nigeria.Another great feature of staying at Jambo House is the excellent dining options. Jiko – The Cooking Place is their signature dining location and Boma is their buffet, both offering unique experiences featuring African dishes. The Mara is the quick service location and is where you can grab the popular zebra dome desserts outside of Boma. Victoria Falls is a beautiful lounge located on a mezzanine between the lobby and the lower restaurant level. The resort offers a free culinary tour each afternoon before dinner, where cast members will discuss the decor of Jiko and Boma in relation to their home countries and offer sample tastings.If you’re staying at Jambo House in the fall, you should be aware that the Uzima Springs pool is under refurbishment and is expected to be closed until December. Guests can still use the Samawati Springs pool at Kidani Village.All transportation from Jambo House is by bus, with Animal Kingdom being the closest park. The resort’s distance from the other Walt Disney World parks is a knock against it. There is a van service for transport between Jambo House and Kidani Village or it is a reasonable walk.Animal Kingdom Villas Jambo House may not have the prime location of the monorail resorts or the Crescent Lake resorts, but it’s absolutely unique in its theming and features. From the live animals wandering nearby to the cast members from Africa sharing stories from their countries, a stay at Jambo House is an experience onto its own that you can’t get anywhere else on property.Have you stayed at Jambo House recently, or is Animal Kingdom Villas your home resort? We’d love to hear your observations in the comments.last_img read more

5 Ways to Use Social Media to Find B2B Influencers

first_img Topics: Webinar: Twitter for Marketing and PR Originally published Feb 2, 2009 7:50:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 This post was written by Dan Zarella .  1. LinkedInProbably the most obvious way to identify influential individuals at specific organizations is by searching the trusty social network for business people, LinkedIn. A search for your target business or title on LinkedIn will show you people you may already be connected with, either directly or through your connections. This is a good place to start, since you might be able to leverage your exisiting contacts.The social media playing field is much bigger than LinkedIn, and as a recent HubSpot cartoon mentioned, LinkedIn can be a bit of a walled-garden , discouraging “weak” connections. The two other largest social arenas (Twitter and Facebook) are also ripe for this type of search.2. TwitterOne of my favorite features of Twitter Grader is the search function . You can put in a keyword and see the most influential Twitter users who’ve used that keyword, effectively a list of thought leaders in that niche. But if you’re looking to identify influencers in a business or organization don’t limit yourself to just searching for topical keywords, try brand or company names, or even titles. For instance, if you were looking for the most influential Twitterers inside of Ford, a search for Ford would quickly reveal that Scott Monty is the head of social media at the automobile giant. A similar search for HubSpot would show you those HubSpotters who are on Twitter (and there are a bunch of us).3. Facebook Facebook Grader , a newer HubSpot tool along the same lines as Twitter Grader, can be used in a similar way. Keep in mind that this tool is newer and will only return users who have used the tool to grade their Facebook accounts already, but this tool has the potential to be even more powerful, given the much larger audience on Facebook. One example that does return results already is a search for HubSpot.4. BloggersYou can also use a variety of blog search engines to search for bloggers in your target companies or roles. Good ones to start with are Technorati and Google Blog Search , but there are tons out there and they all return slightly different results, so give some of the others a try. You can also search on bookmarking sites like delicious to see which blogs have been bookmarked the most.5. Niche Social NetworksThere are a ton of smaller, niche networks where professionals in nearly every industry gather. Find the social networks for your vertical and search for your target businesses or roles there. A few examples of this type of site include Toolbox for IT , Lawyrs , Decorati , Reel-Exchange and MediaBistro .Then, Connect with Influencers  Once you’ve identified your influencers, use the tools and mechanisms provided by the social site you found them on to connect with them. Send them an invitation to join your network if you found them on LinkedIn. If they’re on Twitter, follow them and start replying to their tweets and ReTweeting their good posts (ReTweeting especially will ingratiate yourself with your targets — people love that). If they write a blog, subscribe to their feed and start commenting on their posts and linking to them from your blog (again, bloggers love getting links, so this is an especially good tactic). Generally speaking, networking and connecting for business purposes in these three ways tends to be accepted.Facebook can be more tricky, so tread with caution here. If it looks like they’re friends with a lot of people, including professional contacts that they might not be actual, social friends with, its probably not going to bother them if you send them a friend request. On the other hand if they don’t have a ton of friends, they’re likely to be using Facebook only to connect with their real-world family and friends, so chances are good that its best to not try to friend them for business purposes. Influencer Marketing Want to learn more about using Twitter for Marketing and PR? Download the free webinar for tips and tricks to drive inbound marketing using Twitter. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

How Many Visitors Should Your Site Get?

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Marketers and small business owners we speak with at HubSpot often ask how many visitors their site should be getting.The answer depends on several variables including size of company, industry, and the type of product or service the company is selling. To provide a general benchmark, I pulled together some aggregate data on website traffic based on company size and type.The chart below shows the median weekly unique website visitors for 1,324 HubSpot customers for the 7 days ending September 10, 2009. So, if you’re a 6-10 person B2B company and you’re getting 124 unique visitors a weekly you’re about average for similar companies.A few notes on the data: The median was used as opposed to the average since a few sites with large numbers of visitors skewed the average up in each category. Therefore, the median serves as a better benchmark for typical companies in each segment. I broke out the data by size of company based on number of employees and also by whether the site is for a B2B or B2C company. Not surprisingly, companies with more employees tend to have more website visitors. Also, B2C companies have more visitors than B2B companies regardless of size. However, it’s interesting to note that the difference in visitors between B2C and B2B sites seems to be more pronounced in larger companies:• B2C companies with over 200 employees had 203% more unique visitors than the B2B with over 200 employees.• B2C companies with 1 to 5 employees had only 67% more unique visitors than the B2B with 1 to 5 employees.Two groups of customers were filtered out of the analysis:• Customers with less than five unique visitors per week were filtered out of the analysis since those customers often have not fully launched their websites or have not installed the HubSpot tracking software.• HubSpot customers that signed up after 7/31/09 were excluded to ensure that the tracking software was fully installed and functional at the time of measurement. How to Generate Leads for Small Business Originally published Sep 22, 2009 8:15:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Web Analyticscenter_img Topics: Learn how small businesses can level the playing field and generate leads efficiently by leveraging inbound Internet marketing strategies and tools.Download our Lead Generation for Small Business Webinar.last_img read more

Free Link-Building Directories to Jumpstart Your Search Engine Ranking

first_img Link Building Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Editor’s Note: The contents of this articles are out of date. It remains live for posterity (hah, remember when people used link building directories?), but the advice is no longer current with Google’s recommendations. If you’d like to stay up to date with the latest SEO trends, I recommend checking out this article.Links are the top metric by which search engines determine who you are and what you are about, and ultimately how you are ranked in search results.  In other words, links are your website’s life line. A great way to jumpstart your link-building efforts to get that online vote of trust is to submit your business to directories, which is a great way to get your small business website on the map.Wondering how to get more inbound linksto your website, and where to start? Here’s a list of top link-building directories, which are all FREE resources to help you get started.Access 4 Essential Link-Building TipsLocal Directories:Loopt.comLocaleze.comBiglocal.comOpenlist.comOutside.inBOTW.org/top/Regional/United_StatesSuperpages.comSearch Engine Local Business Listings:Yahoo.com, Google.com and Bing.com LocalGetlisted.org (to double check if you’ve been listed)Blog Directories:DoFollowBlogs.comPlaceBlogger.comBloglines.comBlogsearch.Google.comTechnorati.comBlogged.comBlogCatalog.comBlogmarks.netMyBlogLog.comZimbio.comReview and Rating Directories:Yelp.comRateitall.comInsiderPages.comDirectories not only help you get more inbound links but also bring in more qualified traffic and generate leads. As you add your business to directories, be sure to use very specific categories including location, industry-specific niches and anything else that makes you unique. Whether you are locally focused or have branches throughout the country, you should be listed where people are looking for you. Inbound links pointing to your site from other trusted sources on the Web are like people raising their hand to Google and saying, “You should pay attention to this one!”Photo Credit: Jurek Durczak Topics: Originally published Feb 11, 2010 2:30:00 PM, updated September 07 2017last_img read more

How to Write a Whitepaper That Will Capture Leads

first_img Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Content Types Originally published Sep 1, 2010 8:00:00 AM, updated August 26 2017 The following is a guest post by John McTigue, Executive Vice President and Co-Owner of Kuno Creative . Kuno Creative is a Certified HubSpot Partner Agency based in Avon, OH that specializes in building brands and capturing sales leads.Download our free marketing tool that helps you generate more leads and learn about website visitors.ScopeWhitepapers are usually in-depth reports on a specific topic, like a research paper intended for publication on the Web. Typically at least 10 pages in length with illustrations, charts and references, the average whitepaper is not designed for casual browsing and usually requires several readings to glean the full extent of its information. Readers expect a high degree of expertise backed by solid research that is fully documented by references. It can take weeks or even months to write and polish a good whitepaper.StyleWhitepapers are usually serious in tone and professional in appearance. You can expect your readers to include people who are considering purchasing your products or services, so you want to make sure your whitepapers are written well, edited well and formatted to represent your brand on the same level as your brochures and website. It’s a good idea to enlist the services of a graphic designer to layout your pages, images, fonts and colors for best results. Have at least two experienced writers review your document for grammar, spelling and accuracy. Make sure your management team has reviewed it to avoid possible problems with content or strategy.IntentBlogs are intended for reaching out to the general public, to update them on your ideas and strategies. More often than not, blogs are opinion-based. Usually blogs are informal and often playful. Whitepapers are for capturing leads – it’s all about business. You are providing something truly valuable for your target audience. Good information backed by well-documented research is worth its weight in gold. When someone signs up for your whitepaper on your landing page they are connecting with you and allowing you to connect with them further, i.e. move them further down the sales funnel. They will gladly do this if your whitepaper provides useful information and insight they can’t get elsewhere.So what constitutes a great lead-generating whitepaper? Find a topic that feeds a need . You must know your target market, what do they want to know and what’s already out there? You can explore topics in social media and community sites that generate a lot of comments. If you have expertise in one of those topics, get to work. Put your heart into it . Don’t just patch together a bunch of other peoples’ work. Analyze the data and add value by evaluating options and presenting them to your readers in an easy to understand way. Make it substantial . Cover the ground. Make an outline first, and organize it well into chapters or sections. It’s a good idea to make each section a “bite-sized” chunk, maybe one page with charts or graphics that covers a certain point. Make it authoritative . Do your homework and make sure you mention previous authoritative work on the subject. Your mission isn’t to be the only expert in the field – it’s to be the latest expert with the freshest insights. Create a great landing page . Include a summary and topics to let people know what the whitepaper’s about. Tell them why it’s important to them, and with time and exposure, include some snippets from comments and reviews. Here are some examples of whitepapers on inbound marketing: Inbound Marketing Blueprint for the C-Suite (Kuno Creative) Inbound Marketing Gameplan (PR2020) The 7 Universal Laws Of Pull Marketing (PullnotPush) Internet Marketing Whitepapers (HubSpot) Tell us about some great whitepapers you have downloaded and why you liked them.last_img read more

4 Tips to Increase eCommerce Holiday Sales

first_img Topics: Originally published Sep 20, 2010 11:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Holiday Marketing Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack The time for eCommerce holiday shopping is quickly approaching, and if you are not already developing your plan to maximize your return on the spike of online sales, you need to start now!!  According to a report provided from comScore , the 2009 eCo mmerce Holiday S pending reached $27 billion.   This year will be no different — and I am willing to bet that this number will rise even higher.  Are you prepared to take advantage? Be   Prepared for the Online Holiday Rush 1.  Write blog posts that are optimized for the long-tail of “holiday” centric keywords.  For example, if you sell shoes, you could write blog posts around the subject of holiday specials for your products.   “5 Reasons Ugg Boots and Slippers Will Dominate Holiday Gifts”    “3 Great Tennis Shoes for a Boy’s Christmas Present”   “Christmas Basketball Shoe Sales Will Be A Slamdunk in 2010” Writing content that includes your products and the holiday terms (Christmas, holiday presents, holiday gifts, Christmas ideas, boy holiday gifts, girl Christmas gifts, ect.) will help your website rank better for these longer-tail niche keywords.  Make sure that you have strong call-to-action buttons on each of your blog posts that link to landing pages explaining holiday promotions for specific products or product categories.   2.  Develop Promotional Landing Pages that are designed to target Holiday traffic.  Entice your visitors to buy from you by giving them time-sensitive pricing incentives that are only available during the holidays.  Showcase your top performing products on holiday themed landing page with great offers.  “20% off when purchasing $50 or more before X date.”  “Free t-shirt included when you purchase before X date.” Maybe your visitors are interested in your products, but not committed to purchasing immediately. Help convert these visitors to customers by giving them incentive to sign up for exclusive promotional offers.  “Sign up for exclusive holiday deals only available for existing or new subscribers.  This Special will expire on X Date.  Sign up now to secure your discount!”    3.  Send Holiday marketing emails and use lead nurturing.  Increase your holiday revenue by nurturing your visitors that haven’t committed to a purchase and rewarding your existing customers with exclusive offers.   Existing customers have already purchased from you and like your products — reward and entice them to buy more for their friends and family!  Send an email reminding your existing customers that the holidays are quickly approaching, and that you are offering them an exclusive, limited time offer.   Give a coupon code with a reminder that this code will expire by “X” date.  Make sure that this email includes links back to either your blog posts about your most popular seasonal items or landing pages designed to show additional value for shopping early.   Additionally, you should use lead nurturing emails to leverage the holiday season in your favor by placing new leads into campaigns designed entice earlier purchases.  Remembering to segment your lead nurturing campaigns is an important step.  If a visitor comes to your website and is interested in getting a special holiday deal on jackets, make sure that you send them emails designed to sell jackets, not shoes!   4.  Monitor and promote your brand and products in social media with holiday keywords.  Monitoring and promoting your most popular products is essential for eCommerce stores in 2010.  Tracking holiday centric keywords is an advanced skill that can help you sell more.  Instead of just tracking the keyword “Ugg boots” track “Ugg boots christmas” and “Ugg boats holiday present.”  Tracking these terms in Twitter will allow you to see tweets that say, “All I want for Christmas are Ugg Boots!” and “Are Ugg boots for my daughter for a good holiday present?”  You could then engage these tweeters to let them know about your new article “5 Reasons Ugg Boots and Slippers Will Dominate Holiday Gifts”.  Or you could send them links to a landing page that offers 20% Off Ugg Boots when signing up for promotional discount emails. Utilizing these inbound marketing tactics will ensure that your eCommerce site is prepared for the holiday rush.  Have you seen your favorite stores already using some of these tactics mentioned?  Do you have other suggestions?  I would love to hear your feedback! Photo curtesy of Luiz A. Villa last_img read more

9 SEO Insights You Must Follow

first_img 9.  Meta Keywords Topics: Use both the keywords that are in your page title at least three times in the page’s content. Try to bold or underline the keyword at least once.  This has an effect on how relevant the keyword is to the page. SEO Here are nine SEO techniques that you should always follow regardless of the changes the search engines are continuously making. The website page’s URL should include the first keyword you used in the pages page tile .  If can’t identify two or three keywords for a page you than need to separate out the pages content and create a new website page. The page title needs to be under 70 characters and no more than 3 long tail keywords in the page title. Your most important keyword should be first and each keyword should be separated by pipes (|). major changes Originally published Dec 13, 2010 7:00:00 AM, updated October 30 2019 3. URL The page should have one (1) or two (2) H1 heading tags that use the first two keywords in the page title in step 1. These keywords should be used in a conversational format in the pages content.  In addition to H1 tags, the page should include a couple of H2 heading tags that usually go underneath each H1 tag. The meta description should be under 150 characters and incorporate two of the keywords used in the page’s page title. The best meta descriptions provide a valuable, compelling reason why someone should visit the page.  Don’t add keywords into the meta description for the sake of having them in there, but include them in a conversational format. Create one (1) or two (2) internal links on the page linking to related pages. Use the keywords you’re targeting on the page that you’re linking to in the anchor text for each link. Pre-Step 1: 4. Heading Tags 8. Cross Linking Pages Make sure you have at least three internal links that link to the page you’re optimizing. The link’s anchor text should have keywords that are included in the page you’re linking too.center_img 1. Page Title 2. Meta Description 6. Internal Links 7. Images Any images used on the page should have their file name match one of the keywords in the page title. Each word in the file name should be separate with dashes (-).  The image alt text should match the image’s file name and the keyword in the page title. Don’t use dashes between the word in the alt text. SEO is actually a relatively simple technique that requires small changes based on If you are unable to change image file name or it’s a very time consuming process, then only change the image’s alt text using a keyword from the page title.  Read the page’s content and identify two or three keywords that are most frequently used in the page’s content and are relevant to the overall page topic.  You should only target from step  1 The primary goal of your search engine optimization (SEO) is to drive relevant people that are interested in your industry or company to your website.  If you follow SEO than you know how fast things change.  You also know how hard it can be to keep all with these changes.   . The keywords in the URL should be separated using dashes (-).   e.g. www.sample.com/best-vermont-ski-resorts 5.  Page Content the search engines announce. I bold major changes because the changes really need to be major to affect your overall website rankings and SEO strategy. They aren’t part of Google’s or Bing’s search algorithm, so they aren’t as important as steps 1-8.  However, still add three (3) to five (5) meta keywords to the page that are related to the page title and content.  Smaller search engines still might use them in their algorithm. two (2) or three (3) keywords per website page Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

What Topic Do You Want To Learn About in HubSpot’s Next Ebook?

first_img Loading… Originally published Jun 2, 2011 11:30:00 AM, updated July 19 2013 Go ahead … don’t be shy!center_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img

How to Select the Right CTA for Every Page on Your Site

first_img Calls to Action Topics: The content assets listed in the ‘awareness’ stage are appropriate for that stage of the buying cycle because they help educate your lead — not on your solution , but on their need . The content assets in the ‘evaluation’ stage, however, speak directly to how your company can help solve their needs, bridging the gap between the educational assets and product/service information. The assets in the ‘purchase’ stage require more action from the lead — actions the lead is more likely to take because they’re now more educated about their problem and why your company is a good choice for solving it.You’ll notice some content asset types appear in more than one stage of the buying cycle — webinars, for example. This is due to the content in that content asset type. A webinar from the ‘awareness’ stage of the buying cycle would be educational about a general subject matter, while a webinar from the ‘evaluation’ stage would be centered around your specific solution.An added benefit to completing this exercise is that you’ll be able to identify any holes in your content strategy. Do you notice you have quite a few offers to cater to prospects in the top of the funnel (the awareness stage), but very few offers to satisfy prospects’ needs at the middle (evaluation stage) or bottom (purchase stage) of the funnel? Knowing which stages of the funnel for which you’re lacking offers will help to inform your future content creation strategy so you have a well-rounded arsenal of offers that can be used in other marketing efforts like lead nurturing .Now that you’ve successfully mapped your existing offers to the stages in the sales cycle, you’re ready for step 2! Step 2: Map Your Website Pages to Stages in the Sales Cycle The next thing you’ll need to do is determine how each page on your website aligns with the stages you identified in step 1. By knowing which pages more effectively appeal to visitors in particular stages of the sales cycle, you’ll know where to place the offer CTAs that coincide with those stages (which you’ve already done in step 1).So how do you know which pages of your website map to which stages of your sales cycle? You’ll need two pieces of intelligence: your analytics, and your common sense. The first one is something you need to rely on your marketing analytics software for; the latter one is entirely up to you ;-)Add a new sheet to your spreadsheet, and this time, list all of the pages on your website in column A. If you have a ton of pages on your site, you can make things a little easier for yourself by bucketing pages into different categories, such as ‘about’ pages, product pages, blog pages, thank-you pages, case study pages, marketing resources pages, and so on and so forth. The only pages you shouldn’t add CTAs to are the landing pages for your offers , as you never want to distract visitors from or add more friction to the pages where you house your lead-capture forms. Now add a new column to your spreadsheet and categorize each page/category of pages by which stage in the sales cycle visitors will most likely be in if they’re on those pages. Again, use a combination of common sense and your marketing analytics. Here’s how. Leveraging Your Common Sense Think logically about each page on your website. Are people who are hanging out on your products pages more likely to be in the awareness stage or the evaluation/purchase stages? The latter, right? What about pages like your press room or ‘About Us’ page? People checking out these pages are probably just getting to know your business, so they’re most likely in the awareness stage. And the pages housing your case study or testimonial content likely attract prospects who are in the evaluation stage, right? Other pages, like those on your blog for instance, might get a combination of traffic: people who find your articles organically through search and know nothing about your business yet, or repeat visitors/subscribers who keep coming back to your blog and, while they may have advanced to the evaluation or purchase stages, still find your blog content valuable and useful. Leveraging Your Marketing Analytics We all know that great marketers don’t solely rely on common sense. They also heavily depend on data to make the most informed marketing decisions. This is where your analytics come into play. Using tools like HubSpot’s Conversion Assists can help you identify which pages on your website contribute to leads and customers. Conversion assists are pages on your website that your visitors viewed before converting into leads or customers. In other words, if you notice that particular pages are commonly viewed before leads converted into customers, you know those pages are influential in the evaluation or purchase stages. Similarly, if you notice that particular pages are commonly visited before people convert from visitors to leads, you know those pages are influential in the awareness stage. Step 3: Use Analytics to Identify Your Best Offers for Each Stage So now you know which stage in your sales cycle each of your offers align with, and you’ve also determined which pages on your site CTAs for those offers belong. You’re nearly there!Depending on how many offers you have identified for each stage, you might want to do just a bit more analysis to pinpoint your best-performing offers. This is particularly important if you have a bunch of offers available and need to narrow down a list of those to use in CTAs on your web pages. If you don’t have very many available, you’ll probably be creating CTAs for all of them so you’re not using the same CTA on every page, and you can likely skip this step. (But you should probably invest more time into content creation to expand the number of offers you have at your disposal.) Use your landing page analytics to analyze your offers by each sales cycle stage, and pick out your top-performing offers by using metrics such as landing page conversion rate and submissions as proxies. For HubSpot customers, the Landing Page Analytics tool makes this a snap!  Finally, in the second sheet of your spreadsheet, create a new column, and add these offers to your rows of website pages, matching them with their appropriate stage in the sales cycle.Voila! Now you have a spreadsheet that indicates which offers you will use in CTAs on what website pages! Step 4: Design, Test, and Analyze Now that you know what to do, do it! Add the appropriate CTA buttons for your offers to their corresponding web pages. And if you don’t have CTAs for your offers, get to designing them! Hire a designer, create them yourself, or use a tool like HubSpot’s CTA Module to get going.And don’t forget to do some testing, particularly on pages whose sales cycle stages aren’t so cut and dry like your blog. Test CTAs for different offers on different pages to optimize performance and come up with your own best practices that are specific to your business, industry, and audience. Again, HubSpot’s CTA Module (pictured above) makes it very easy to A/B test calls-to-action to optimize click-through rates and conversions. How do you determine which CTAs to include on your website’s various pages? Originally published Apr 11, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017center_img The call-to-action (CTA) is an important tool for promoting your marketing offers and making sure your lead gen engine stays humming. In fact, we believe that your CTAs should be on just about every page of your website. After all, if you’re putting all that hard work into creating stellar marketing offers and building the landing pages to house them, you need to let your website visitors know they exist. CTAs are a great way to do that.But surely there should be more of a science involved than just slapping a CTA button on any page on your site willy-nilly … especially if you’ve been building out your offer backlog and have several of them at your disposal. So how do you know which offer’s CTA button to put on what pages of your website? Here’s an easy step-by-step guide to make it easy to decide. Step 1: Map Your Offers to Stages in the Sales Cycle Before you do anything else, you need to conduct an audit of all the marketing offers you have at your disposal. Create a spreadsheet, and list all of your offers in column A. It’s also a good idea to list their corresponding landing pages in column B, if only to have a record of all your offers and their URLs in one place.Next, identify the various stages in your sales cycle. This may be different from business to business and industry to industry, but just so we’re all on the same page, we’ll go with the three most widely recognized stages: awareness , evaluation , and purchase . Awareness: Prospects have either become aware of your product or service, or they have become aware that they have a need that must be fulfilled. Evaluation: Prospects are aware that your product or service could fulfill their need, and they are trying to determine whether you are the best fit. Purchase: Prospects are ready to make a purchase.Identifying the stages in your sales cycle is important, because not every offer will be appropriate for prospects in every stage of the sales cycle. For example, if you sell personal tax software, a website visitor in the awareness stage might have found an article on your blog because they were looking for information about how to do their taxes by themselves. In this case, the best offer for them probably isn’t a free trial of your software, because they may not even know you sell software or that they need software to solve their problem. For this new visitor who knows nothing about you or what you offer, an educational ebook called something like “10 Common Mistakes People Make When Filing Their Taxes” would probably be a much more suitable offer. That free trial, on the other hand, would likely be something you’d offer to a prospect in the purchase stage.Once you’ve identified the various stages in your sales cycle, add a third column to your spreadsheet, and categorize each of your existing offers by these stages. The diagram below will help you determine which types of offers typically map to the three main stages in the sales cycle . Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

21 Reasons People Don’t Trust Your Company

first_img13) You’ve got bad online reviews.Just having great reviews isn’t enough to ensure you’ve got a trustworthy company image, though. You should also be monitoring for and addressing negative online reviews about your company. In fact, Socialnomics reports that 25% of search results return user-generated content from review sites, blogs, and social media updates … and 65% of Gen Y users are considering that information when making purchasing decisions, according to eMarketer. It probably doesn’t behoove you to have hordes of disgruntled customers be the first impression people have with your company, eh?14) You have no social presence.Did you set up a Facebook business page last year as a New Year’s resolution, use it aggressively for two weeks, then half-heartedly post once every other month for a while until you finally just gave it up completely? That’s a fine little secret to keep to yourself, but it doesn’t look too good when leads stumble upon it. Social media has become ubiquitous, and when companies have abandoned social profiles, it looks like they don’t have all their ducks in a row. Put serious effort into maintaining an active social presence so your leads see you as a 21st century company.15) You’re not engaging in social media conversations.Maintaining an active social presence means that your fans and followers will be engaging with the content you publish. Are you engaging back? Social media is a two-way street, and companies that don’t carry on the conversation they start with their networks … well … they kind of look like jerks. I mean, how would you feel if someone asked you a question, you answered, and they just walked away? Doesn’t sound like someone who is too interested in building a strong relationship with customers.16) You’re getting all defensive.Part of being an active inbound marketer and content creator is just putting yourself out there — especially in social media. As such, pretty much every company is going to get called out at some point for saying something “wrong.” Sometimes it really is wrong … and sometimes it’s just taken the wrong way. Either way, the right response is apologetic, not defensive. Companies that don’t know how to handle criticism come off very negatively with their leads and customers, and it’s a quick way to alienate a group of people who once may have been huge supporters of your brand. Don’t turn your back on the fans, leads, and customers that have gotten you where you are today!17) You’re emailing people that didn’t opt in.Is there any greater breach of trust than illicitly bombarding someone’s inbox?Okay yeah, there totally is. But in the internet marketing world, emailing people that didn’t opt in to receive communications is definitely high up on the list of most-trust-breaching activities you could perform. The last thing you want to combat is a spammer reputation — that’s one that could hurt you in not only your leads’ and customers’ eyes, but also ESPs and ISPs, too.18) It’s not easy to unsubscribe from your emails.Speaking of sketchy email marketing behavior, even a list full of opt-in email addresses can result in a tarnished company reputation if you don’t make it easy for those contacts to unsubscribe from email communication.Here’s the thing about the “Unsubscribe” button in emails — other than it being a legal requirement and all. I don’t always unsubscribe from email communications because I hate that company so much. I do it because I moved. I changed jobs. I can’t afford their products. I don’t need their services. I stopped opening their emails months ago and I’m just now getting around to unsubscribing. You know when I do unsubscribe out of pure, unadulterated ire? When I go to peacefully unsubscribe and that button is hidden better than a fugitive on the run. This is a surefire way to get people to not only distrust your company — but also to loathe you.19) You’re sending poorly targeted email content.Segmented email lists that send highly targeted content are awesome, and they make a company look like it magically knows all your innermost desires. Poorly targeted email content makes people feel like a sales target. Email marketing is a two-way communication, just like social media — don’t send email AT people. Send messages to them so they feel like you actually care about providing something they’d find valuable. Want to start segmenting? Here are 27 ways to slice and dice your email list.20) Your emails keep going into SPAM folders.Who is the least trustworthy person in your inbox? All of the people in your SPAM folder. Don’t let your company be one of them. Make sure you’re optimizing your emails for the inbox, and have a great Sender Score so your email actually gets delivered!21) Be excellent to each other. Alright, this isn’t a reason people don’t trust you, but it’s a way to get them to. Whenever you get the chance, you should be proactively showing customer love, lead love, fan love, follower love, employee love … all of the love. Got a nice comment on a blog post? Pop into the comments and say thank you. Received a retweet? Reply every now and then expressing your gratitude. Employee finish a marathon? Congratulate them on Facebook. Regularly showing gratitude for everyone involved in your success makes you a generally likable company. And not doing it makes you look like you’re all take-take-take. And when that happens, eventually, people will stop giving.What do you do to establish a trustworthy company image? What do you explicitly avoid?Image credit: Neal. Originally published Jul 25, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Hey, lean in real close. I have a little secret to tell you. It’s about how to get more customers.Ready?Stop being sketchy.Did I just blow your mind? Probably not, right? Then why are there still so many companies out there eliciting the stink eye from leads and prospects? Probably because they’re doing things that come across as really untrustworthy, and they don’t even know it.You could hire a branding consultant or agency to help your company be more likeable, but I have a better idea. Before you drop a dime on that, run your company through the sketch-o-meter to see if there are any things you can cross off the list of major turnoffs. Chances are, if you’re doing any of these things that tend to make people distrust companies, nixing it from your marketing repertoire will do some serious wonders for your likeability index. Take a look!21 Reasons People Don’t Trust Your Company1) You’re rocking an erratic website design.First impressions are everything. And these days, simplicity and ease of navigation is key. Is that the experience your site visitors are getting? You’re probably familiar with the blink test, the commonly accepted 3 seconds you have to orient new visitors to your website. If you’re hampering it with distracting animation, cluttered navigation, or slow-loading images, you’re making them think one of two things: this site will give me a virus or this messy site is symptomatic of a messy company. Neither are good, and both leave your visitors confused enough to click the “back” button in their browser. Click here to learn how to do a website design right. 2) There’s no way to contact someone.Why can’t I get in touch with you? If your website doesn’t offer contact information — a phone number, an email address, even a physical address — you give the impression you don’t want to actually talk to anyone. You’ll take their money, but you sure as sugar won’t talk to them. And no, a “Contact Us” button that leads to a form is not an acceptable replacement for providing a phone number or email address.3) You have absolutely no pricing information available.No pricing information? Not even a hint of what your products or services might cost? You know what that says to most people? I want to sell to you. And we all know how much people love to be sold to.I know, I know, you have a consultative selling process! You have to assess what each lead needs! If you put the price up, you’ll scare people away! You don’t have to publish your price down to the exact cent, but you should give visitors a general idea of what your products or services cost so they know whether they can even afford to consider your solution.4) You’re writing vague copy.Speaking of being a tad too secretive … your copy shouldn’t leave site visitors guessing. Show website copy to someone outside your company, and ask them if they understand what you’re talking about. If readers don’t understand what you’re trying to say, it’s easy for them to assume a company is trying to pull the wool over their eyes. Hosting an event with an extra cost for entry after 10:00 p.m.? Don’t hide that last little tidbit from readers — emphasize it so you don’t lose their long-term trust.5) You’re spelling and grammer isn’t well.Being specific in your copywriting isn’t enough, either. You need to actually look like you gave a hoot while you were writing it. Nothing looks less professional than writing that’s chock full of spelling and grammar mistakes. You don’t have to be Shakespeare, but for goodness sake run your copy through spell check! It’s disrespectful to readers to make them try to parse unintelligible copy, and frankly, they won’t bother. After all, if you can’t manage to run a spell check, how could you manage to provide a high-quality solution?6) You’re writing for search engines, not people.Most inbound marketers are very concerned with their organic search presence, and for good reason. But sometimes, that concern manifests itself in copy that looks like this:Our marketing solutions services software is ideal for enterprise organization marketing software solutions looking for help with their marketing email automation.Would you really write out a check to a company whose website reads that way? I think not. If not because it looks like the company’s stuck in the 90s, but because you’d have no idea what they actually do after reading a sentence like that. Write for humans, using search terms that make sense within the context of your sentences. Google’s crawlers are smart enough to understand what your website is about nowadays without you squeezing round hole terms into square peg sentences.7) You haven’t established a thought leadership position.If you aren’t creating content that establishes you as an authority, it’s hard to convince prospects that you’re a trustworthy source. And people don’t tend to jump at the opportunity to give their money to untrustworthy companies. So publish blog content, write whitepapers, create ebooks, record videos and podcasts, get quoted in other people’s content … the more you show people how much you know, the more credibility you build with them!8) You’re givin’ the ol’ bait and switch.Once you have all that content, you need to ensure you’re representing it fairly, particularly with lead and customer generation content. If you’re offering a 50% off coupon, make sure any fine print is really more like big, bold, glaring print with flashing lights. If a lead goes to redeem their 50% off coupon, only to find it’s only valid on the first full moon of a leap year, you’re going to look like a bit of a schmuck for not telling them before they got to the checkout process.9) You have overly personal form fields.Do you need to know my zip code? My favorite color? My greatest fear? Why? Look, if there’s a valid reason for collecting a piece of intelligence in a form field, your leads and customers will understand. But if you’re collecting a ton of personal information for no apparent reason, it looks like you’re stockpiling for the lead intelligence apocalypse, or channeling that information to a third party. Which brings us to our next point …10) You don’t have a visible privacy policy.Share your privacy policy with leads and customers when they’re inputting their personal information so they know you won’t share their information with any third parties. A simple link above a field — commonly the email field — will tell people that you can be trusted to handle their personal information with discretion.11) No third-party organizations are vouching for you.Not all third parties are bad, though! Third-party organizations like the BBB, VeriSign, McAfee, and TRUSTe all provide badges for trustworthy websites that act as good visual cues for visitors that they’re a legitimate company to do business with. These cues are particularly important for service businesses and ecommerce businesses that are handling monetary transactions online.12) And customers aren’t promoting you, either.It’s not just third-party organizations you need to woo to establish a trustworthy image — you need plenty of customer testimonials, too. Including testimonials on your website can help convince those leads and customers on the fence about your offers, products, and services that you’re a safe bet. Take a look at how maid service franchise Molly Maid does it on their site. Topics:center_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Email Marketing Mistakeslast_img read more