Hearts boss Craig Levein named manager of the month

first_imgHearts manager Craig Levein has been named Premiership manager of the month for August.The accolade was awarded to Levein after he returned to work following a recent health scare.The Tynecastle side won all three of their Premiership matches last month and currently sit five points clear at the top of the table.Hearts began August with a 4-1 away victory over Hamilton before defeating champions Celtic 1-0 in Edinburgh. They continued their 100 per cent record as they eliminated Dunfermline from the League Cup before travelling to Rugby Park to secure a 1-0 win over Kilmarnock.Levein’s side have maintained their stunning form into September with a 4-1 victory over St Mirren at Tynecastle, followed up by last weekend’s 1-0 win at Motherwell.The former Scotland boss returned to watch that match from the stands at Fir Park.Levein said of the award: “It’s recognition for a lot of people at the club that we’ve started the season well. “Particularly, the staff that we’ve had to lean on the last couple of weeks who have been fantastic.“If I could cut it into a hundred pieces and hand it out I would.”Hearts face newly-promoted Livingston on Saturday as they look to cement their position at the top of the Premiershiplast_img read more

Marshfield, Columbus Catholic soccer stars make all-conference

first_imgDons’ Fuerlinger named MSSC Player of the YearBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterMARSHFIELD — The Marshfield Columbus Catholic and Marshfield high school boys soccer teams put together impressive winning seasons, and it showed as the teams’ respective conferences recently released their all-conference squads for 2016.Columbus Catholic, which won the Mid-State Soccer Conference with a perfect 12-0 record and finished 20-3 overall before losing in the WIAA Division 4 sectional semifinals, had five first-team and three second-team selections to the all-conference squad.Marshfield finished in third place in the Wisconsin Valley Conference at 6-5-1 and ended up 12-8-4 overall after losing in a WIAA Division 1 sectional final, just one win away from the state tournament. The Tigers had a pair of first-team and one second-team all-WVC honorees.Mid-State Soccer ConferenceMarshfield Columbus Catholic senior Tyler Fuerlinger was named the Mid-State Soccer Conference Player of the Year and was one of five Dons picked to the all-conference first team.Fuerlinger, Tim Gruenloh, Charles Payant, and Calvin Brown were unanimous first-team selections for the Dons. Ryan Dieringer was also a first-team selection. Fuerlinger and Brown also earned first-team all-conference accolades in 2015.Nadim Torbey, Nick Malovrh, and goalkeeper Bailey Keffer were second-team honorees for the Dons.Columbus Catholic’s Jeff Edwards was also named conference Coach of the Year after sharing the honor last season.“This team was very successful this year in many aspects,” Edwards said. “We set school records in goals scored and assists given, shattering the previous records. We had six players score at least 10 goals and nine players had double-digit points scored. That speaks to the versatility we had on offense. Our defense led the way, though, allowing only 10 goals in the regular season. Everything started from the back and went from there. I’m extremely proud of each and every player for all of the hard work and dedication they put in since June.”Wisconsin Valley ConferenceMarshfield senior midfielder/defender Alec Hinson was a unanimous first-team selection, and fellow senior midfielder/defender Luke McCann also was voted to the first team of the 2016 All-Wisconsin Valley Conference Boys Soccer Team.Hinson had three goals and four assists during conference play, moving to defense early in the year due to injuries and necessity.Marshfield senior Alec Hinson was a unanimous first-team selection to the 2016 All-Wisconsin Valley Conference Boys Soccer Team, as voted on by the conference’s seven coaches.“He is a great communicator and organizer on defense,” Marshfield coach Steve McCann said. “He wins balls in the air and takes great angles on balls. As a defender, Alec always seemed to make the right choice.”Luke McCann finished fifth in the Valley with 21 total points (eight goals, five assists).McCann also moved back to defensive midfielder midway through the season to help the Tigers build up their resistance.“This gave Luke more space to operate, helped our team defensively, and gave us better ability to get the ball switched side-to-side,” Steve McCann said. “Luke has excellent vision on the field and helps our team to be able to maintain possession and control with smart, accurate passes.”Senior Klaus Friedli was the Tigers’ lone second-team pick. He finished seventh in the conference in points with 17 (five goals, seven assists).Senior Collin Nikolai and sophomore Isaac Wellens were honorable mention choices for Marshfield. Nikolai finished with seven goals and two assists during WVC play.“We started to play really well at the end of September when we beat Wausau West 2-0 and ended up winning eight of our next 10,” Steve McCann said. “We ended up leading the WVC in scoring, shots, corner kicks, and fouls. We were really good at creating scoring chances. Our finishing was inconsistent but was definitely improving at the end of the year.”2016 All-Mid-State Soccer Conference TeamFirst team: *Tyler Fuerlinger, Marshfield Columbus Catholic; *Tim Gruenloh, Marshfield Columbus Catholic; *Charles Payant, Marshfield Columbus Catholic; *Calvin Brown, Marshfield Columbus Catholic; *Harrison Varline, Wausau Newman Catholic; *Connor Molski, Stevens Point Pacelli; *Chris Jensen, Stevens Point Pacelli; *Connor Schubring, Wisconsin Valley Lutheran; Ryan Dieringer, Marshfield Columbus Catholic; David Burgess, Northland Lutheran; Jacob Price, Northland Lutheran; Brad Maes, Stevens Point Pacelli; Rhein Zuelsdorff, Wisconsin Valley Lutheran; Tekoya Cosby, Wisconsin Valley Lutheran.Second team: Nadim Torbey, Marshfield Columbus Catholic; Bailey Keffer, Marshfield Columbus Catholic; Nick Malovrh, Marshfield Columbus Catholic; Chamong Lo, Wausau Newman Catholic; Fernando Juan, Wausau Newman Catholic; Corey Baron, Stevens Point Pacelli; Katie Craig, Tri-County; Coleton Schubring, Wisconsin Valley Lutheran; Austin Pagel, Wisconsin Valley Lutheran.Honorable mention: Andrew Blanker, Stevens Point Pacelli; Grant Faulkner, Wisconsin Valley Lutheran.Player of the Year: Tyler Fuerlinger, Marshfield Columbus Catholic.Coach of the Year: Jeff Edwards, Marshfield Columbus Catholic.*unanimous selection—2016 All-Wisconsin Valley Conference Boys Soccer TeamFirst team: *Alex Pagel, sr., D.C. Everest (goalkeeper); *Jack Mittelsteadt, sr., D.C. Everest; *Alec Hinson, sr., Marshfield; *Joey Dorgan, sr., Stevens Point; *Pet Hefferan, sr., Stevens Point; *Adam Hahn, sr., Wausau East; *Jonah Bakunowicz, sr., Wisconsin Rapids; *Jack Kiiskila, jr., Wisconsin Rapids; Luke McCann, sr., Marshfield; Joe DeLoye, sr., Wausau West; Cullen Stangel, sr., Wausau West.Second team: Matt Altmann, sr., Stevens Point (goalkeeper); Brennan Krieg, jr., D.C. Everest; Seth Jaglinski, sr., D.C. Everest; Austin Zettler, sr., Merrill; Jarett Jones, sr., Stevens Point; Klaus Friedli, sr., Marshfield; McKenon Diekroeger, sr., Stevens Point; Matt Lukasik, jr., D.C. Everest; Nate Napiwocki, sr., Stevens Point; Nick Lange, sr., Wausau East; Dylan Bassuener, sr., Wisconsin Rapids.Honorable mention: Brayden McMahon, sr., Wausau West (goalkeeper); Gunnar Yonker, sr., D.C. Everest; Tamirat Knutson, fr., D.C. Everest; Keondre Porter, jr., Stevens Point; Ben Johnson, jr., Wausau West; Keegan Pulchinski, so., Wisconsin Rapids; Collin Nikolai, sr., Marshfield; Colin Lindvig, jr., Wisconsin Rapids; Zach Ostrowski, jr., D.C. Everest; Brendan Leahy, so., Stevens Point; Elkin Thao, jr., Wausau East; Isaac Wellens, so., Marshfield; Austin Burgener, sr., Merrill; Mark Raasch, jr., Wausau West; Bryson Einerson, jr., Wisconsin Rapids.Player of the Year: Jack Mittelsteadt, sr., D.C. Everest.*unanimous selectionlast_img read more

Igesund’s plea to Bafana’s ’12th man’

first_img22 January 2013 South Africa’s boisterous, colourful supporters are very special to the national team, coach Gordon Igesund said on Monday, urging the public to carry the spirit they showed in Johannesburg over to Durban, where Bafana Bafana face Angola in a must-win game on Wednesday. Addressing journalists in Johannesburg on Monday, Igesund said the crowd at the National Stadium on Saturday had been “brilliant” in their effort to lift the team in very challenging playing conditions. “We now need the public to go to Moses Mabhida Stadium in their numbers and give the boys the support and work as the 12th player. “We will do our best to make our amazing supporters happy,” Igesund vowed. “They have been fantastic throughout and they need to be rewarded with performances that warrant their unwavering support.” He said the dream of winning the tournament was still very much alive, and that it was only a matter of time before Bafana turned their chances into goals. South African Football Association (Safa) president Kirsten Nematandani said Bafana Bafana still had an excellent opportunity to progress further in the tournament. “We urge the public to continue supporting and encouraging our boys to regain their winning mentality.” Bafana will face Angola at the Moses Mabhida stadium at 5pm on Wednesday. Meanwhile, on Tuesday night, in a thrilling Group C match, Ethiopia held reigning champions Zambia to a 1-1 draw at Mbombela Stadium in Nelspruit. Collins Mbesuma scored for Zambia, but Adane Girma equalised for Ethiopia, who were down to 10-men after their goalkeeper Jemal Tassew was sent off for a dangerous tackle in the 25th minute. In the second Group C match, Burkina Faso struck a late equaliser to earn a 1-1 draw against Nigeria, leaving Group C all square. On Tuesday evening, a star-studded Ivory Coast will face a Togolese team led by Tottenham Hotspur striker Emmanuel Adebayor at Royal Bafokeng Stadium in Rusternburg, followed by a clash between North African giants Algeria and Tunisia at the same venue. Source: SANews.gov.zalast_img read more

Amazon Opens a Kindle Store for the iPhone

first_imgTags:#Amazon#E-Books#news#web Today, Amazon finally released an iPhone-specific version of its Kindle eBook store, which makes it a lot easier to browse and buy books while on the go. Sadly, though, Amazon did not release a new version of the Kindle app with a built-in browser (yet). So users are still being kicked out of the iPhone app and taken to Safari in order to browse the store and complete transactions. A button that takes users back to the Kindle app only appears after a purchase in Safari has been completed.The iPhone-optimized site is basically just an eBook-specific version of Amazon’s regular mobile site. Except for the ability to send eBook purchases to your mobile devices – the Kindle and the iPhone – nothing really sets the iPhone Kindle store apart from the rest of Amazon’s mobile site. The mobile site itself is quite well done and makes it easy to browse and buy books (or anything else that Amazon sells for that matter). frederic lardinois Conflict with Apple?A lot of the discussion around the new iPhone optimized Kindle store currently focuses on the fact that Apple, with the upcoming iPhone 3.0 OS update, will make it easy for developers to charge for transactions from within a specific app. Obviously, eBooks would be one of the many areas where developers could not only make good use of this capability, but where Apple could also get a nice 30% cut from every transaction. By going through the web, Amazon can bypass Apple completely.What About Stanza?What will be more interesting to see, though, is if Amazon will also start to integrate some of the technology it acquired when it bought Stanza last month. Stanza already featured the ability to browse books without ever having to leave the app, though the final transactions were also handled on the sellers’ websites. Before the acquisition, Stanza had also been working with Adobe to create a standard for online book catalogs, based on Stanza’s own specifications, and we hope that the Stanza team will continue this work under Amazon and maybe the next version of the Kindle app will integrate some of this work. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

Facebook May Launch Recommendation Service For Other Websites

first_imgTags:#news#NYT#social networks#web Recommendation would be huge for Facebook. Beyond just being cool for users, recommendation is compelling for site publishers because it’s like pre-emptive search.The language in that code implies to me that the feature will display content recommended to a user because of interest by friends in certain content on the site. Presumably if any of your friends have shared links to the site you’re visiting, you’ll be encouraged to visit those pages in particular. Perhaps recommendation will go further than that. It’s really hard to know, but we’ll probably find out tomorrow. That’s the question: is this a way for you to recommend content or to have content recommended to you? If it’s primarily one, I’m guessing it’s the latter. Make no mistake: recommendation could be a huge addition to Facebook’s arsenal. Recommendation technologies are something we’ve covered for years here at ReadWriteWeb. We asked a year ago if Facebook was secretly working on a recommendation technology, though the feature we saw then turned out to be something else.Beyond just being cool for users, recommendation is compelling for site publishers because it’s like pre-emptive search. Everyone wants to give their site owners an opportunity to search for the content they want to find, but even better is prompting them with what’s effectively personalized search results as soon as they land on a page. Opt-out/opt-in? This essential question of privacy will be put to the test in many ways, as Facebook continues to extend its system of identity across the web.Facebook knows enough about you, your interests, your friends, their interests, their friends and their interests too that it should be able to nail recommendations fairly well. Facebook appears to be preparing to launch a recommendation service that will be used on sites around the web. On the day before the F8 developers’ conference, independent developer Jesse Stay has posted code found on Facebook’s GitHub open source code repository account.Facebook is already very practiced at offering recommendations on-site: its News Feed technology pulls the items out of its Live Feed based on who and what you’ve shown is most important to you among all your friends and their activities. Facebook knows more about you than probably any other consumer service online, probably more even than Google. Recommendation could in fact become bigger than search, and so this feature could become one of Facebook’s biggest moves.Stay believes the feature will function like Google SideWiki, the sidebar of running commentary about a page that website owners have no control over but that hasn’t really caught on with users, either. Two things you can be sure of: Facebook recommendations will make use of a website visitor’s Facebook friend connections and the feature will almost definitely make publishers happier than the uncontrollable Google SideWiki did.recommendations site=”abc.com” height=”300″ width=”400″ />should be replaced by an iframe showing recommendations forthe abc website (pending checkin on the server side). Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification marshall kirkpatrick The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Related Posts A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

Norway plans to exterminate a large reindeer herd to stop a fatal infectious brain disease

first_img Hot zone Reindeer will be slaughtered in Nordfjella, Norway; no culling is recommended for the area near Trondheim where two moose with chronic wasting disease have been found. By Erik StokstadApr. 3, 2017 , 5:30 PM CWD, discovered in 1967, has been found in 24 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces, and it has been spread in part by shipments of infected animals. Many species of cervids are susceptible, including elk, moose, and several kinds of deer. Infected animals typically begin showing symptoms such as weight loss, lethargy, and drooling 2 to 3 years after infection and then die within months. In Wyoming, where CWD has been endemic for decades, up to 40% of some herds are infected, and white-tailed deer populations are declining by 10% a year.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)CWD is very contagious: Prions spread easily through saliva, urine, and feces, and can linger in the environment for years, which suggests that feeding stations and salt licks are hot spots of infection. Once the disease has become firmly established, environmental contamination makes eradication very hard, says Christina Sigurdson, a prion researcher at the University of California, San Diego. “It hasn’t been shown so far to be possible,” she says. There’s no evidence that humans can get sick from eating infected deer, but it is not recommended. (Mad cow disease, also caused by prions, can infect people who eat contaminated meat and has caused more than 200 deaths so far.)Norway’s first CWD case was detected by chance after wildlife biologists working in the rugged mountains of Nordfjella found a sick young reindeer on 15 March 2016. After its death, tests at the Norwegian Veterinary Institute (NVI) in Oslo pointed to CWD. “I couldn’t believe it,” says NVI prion researcher Sylvie Benestad. But international reference labs confirmed her diagnosis. The prions resemble those found in North American deer, Benestad and her colleagues have found. How the disease got to Norway is a mystery. Prions may have arrived in deer urine, which is bottled in the United States and sold as a lure, or perhaps they hitched a ride on hiking boots or hunting gear. But prion diseases can also start spontaneously, after proteins begin to misfold in a single individual, and Benestad’s hunch is that this is a more likely scenario. After the initial discovery, Norwegian officials began looking for other cases. A local hunter found two moose with CWD near the town of Selbu, 40 kilometers southeast of Trondheim (see map), in May 2016. During last fall’s hunting season, thousands of hunters and other volunteers collected about 8000 brain samples from all over the country, turning up two more cases of infected reindeer near Nordfjella. The cases in Nordfjella and Selbu are likely not linked, says Benestad, as the reindeer and moose have different types of prions.  Norwegian Institute for Nature Research A year after a deadly and highly contagious wildlife disease surfaced in Norway, the country is taking action. Chronic wasting disease (CWD), caused by misfolded proteins called prions, has already ravaged deer and elk in North America, costing rural economies millions in lost revenue from hunting. Its presence in Norway’s reindeer and moose—the first cases in Europe—is “a very serious situation for the environment and for our culture and traditions,” says Bjørnar Ytrehus, a veterinary researcher at the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research in Trondheim.Last week, Norway’s minister of agriculture and food gave the green light for hunters to kill off the entire herd in which three infected individuals were found, about 2000 reindeer, or nearly 6% of the country’s wild population. “We have to take action now,” says Karen Johanne Baalsrud, director of plant and animal health at the Norwegian Food Safety Authority in Oslo. The deer’s habitat will be quarantined for at least 5 years to prevent reinfection. The odds of a successful eradication, experts say, will depend largely on how long CWD has been present in Norway. CREDITS: (GRAPHIC) G. GRULLÓN/SCIENCE; (DATA) NORWEGIAN VETERINARY INSTITUTE/NORWEGIAN ENVIRONMENT AGENCY Norway plans to exterminate a large reindeer herd to stop a fatal infectious brain disease This reindeer is one of three confirmed to have had chronic wasting disease, the first cases known in the wild outside North America. An advisory panel convened by the Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety last week suggested different approaches for the two locations. Around Selbu, it recommended increased surveillance, but no culling of moose yet. The two infected moose were older animals, suggesting that these were cases of spontaneous disease, which are less likely to be infectious. (The reason why: In spontaneous cases of prion disease, such as in sheep, prions are only found in the brain.) And even even if the unusual prions in moose are contagious, the solitary nature of these animals lowers the chances of transmission.Reindeer, however, are the most gregarious of cervids, and the three sick individuals in Nordfjella could easily have spread prions. Culling the entire herd would be “drastic,” the panel acknowledged, but should be attempted as soon as possible. The slaughter, to start in August, will be carried out by amateur hunters, who can eat the meat if prion tests come back negative. Professional sharpshooters will be used to find any elusive survivors. “We will do whatever it takes,” says Erik Lund, a senior wildlife adviser at the Norwegian Environment Agency in Trondheim. Until the operation begins, wildlife rangers are patrolling to prevent animals from leaving or entering the herd’s 2000-square-kilometer habitat. The area is ringed by paved roads, which reindeer don’t like to cross, but if any do, the rangers have orders to track down and kill them. Repopulation won’t begin until at least 2022. Benestad says testing old feces may be a way to check whether prions lingering in the environment have degraded.Based on the prevalence in Nordfjella—estimated at 1%—Lund guesses that CWD may have been present for only 5 to 7 years, which could mean contamination is minimal. “There’s a good chance they can solve the problem,” says wildlife ecologist Michael Samuel of the University of Wisconsin in Madison. Quick response has been shown to work before: In 2005, routine testing revealed CWD on two deer farms in central New York. Strict regulations prevented the disease from spreading. The state has seen no cases since.But it’s also possible that CWD is lurking elsewhere in Norway, the panel noted. The agencies will collect another 20,000 samples in the coming hunting season, and they plan to continue monitoring for years to come. The specter of CWD has also alarmed the European Food Safety Authority, which released a report in January recommending that seven nearby countries all begin 3-year sampling programs.Clarification, 4 April, 4.20 p.m.: The paragraph explaining why no culling is planned around Selbu has been edited to make it clearer.last_img read more

FIFA’s Chuck Blazer admitted taking bribes for World Cup votes

first_imgA former executive committee member of football’s global governing body FIFA told a US judge in November 2013 that he and other officials took bribes in connection with the 1998 and 2010 World Cups, among other major tournaments.Chuck Blazer, a US citizen, secretly pleaded guilty to 10 criminal counts in New York as part of an agreement with US prosecutors, according to a partially blacked out transcript of the hearing released on Wednesday.According to US officials, Blazer’s cooperation helped build a sprawling corruption case that has led to charges against top FIFA figures and prompted the resignation on Tuesday of longtime president Sepp Blatter.Blazer served as an executive committee member of FIFA from 1997 to 2013 and was the general secretary of CONCACAF, soccer’s governing body in North and Central America and the Caribbean, from 1990 to 2011.”Among other things, I agreed with other persons in or around 1992 to facilitate the acceptance of a bribe in conjunction with the selection of the host nation for the 1998 World Cup,” Blazer told US District Judge Raymond Dearie during a closed-door proceeding in Brooklyn federal court on the morning of November 25, 2013, according to the transcript.Though France won the bidding to host the tournament, separate court documents claim Morocco paid the bribe in connection with the 1998 World Cup.Blazer added that from 2004 to 2011, “I and others on the FIFA executive committee agreed to accept bribes in conjunction with the selection of South Africa as the host nation for the 2010 World Cup.”U.S. authorities have said South Africa paid a $10 million bribe while bidding to be the 2010 World Cup host. The country has confirmed the payment but said it was a donation to support soccer development in the Caribbean, not a bribe.advertisementBlazer also admitted to taking kickbacks related to five different editions of CONCACAF’s premier event, the Gold Cup, between 1996 and 2003.”I knew my actions were wrong at the time,” he said.A lawyer for Blazer declined to comment.Many of the details were revealed in documents released by US authorities last week, when they announced indictments for 14 people, including nine FIFA officials.Blazer, 70, is one of four defendants in the case who pleaded guilty in secret and agreed to assist US investigators.During his plea, he said he suffered from health problems. Friends of Blazer say he is currently hospitalized and unable to speak due to a breathing tube.last_img read more