SCC to host how-to event on photographing the solar eclipse on July 13

first_imgWith a little over two months to go before the solar eclipse, Southwestern Community College is gearing up for the once-in-a-lifetime event by hosting a presentation by photographer Johnny Horne at 7 p.m. on Thursday, July 13, in Myers Auditorium on SCC’s Jackson Campus.This presentation will be a how-to on photographing the solar eclipse, which will occur on Aug. 21.“We are very excited to have Johnny Horne give this presentation,” said Lynda Parlett, SCC’s executive director of institutional development. “This a great opportunity to learn about capturing a photograph of the solar eclipse to share with future generations.”The session will also include information for budding and amateur photographers who wish to take pictures of planets, stars and astronomical events.Horne served as a staff photographer for the Fayetteville Observer for 44 years and is a contributing editor for “Sky and Telescope” magazine.He has also served on the technical support staff for “Sky and Telescope” total solar eclipse expeditions to Mexico, Africa and the Caribbean.In 1986 Horne photographed Halley’s Comet from the Australian Outback, and his astronomical photographs have appeared in magazines and newspapers worldwide.last_img read more

US mag tips Durban as SA’s secret jewel

first_img1 November 2013Durban instead of Cape Town, New York Magazine advises its readers in its winter travel 2013 special.While the publication acknowledges that the world’s greatest cities “got their reputation for a reason”, they’ve decided to turn their attention to long-overshadowed cities such as Bourdeaux (not Paris), Birmingham (not London), Leipzig (not Berlin) – and Durban (not Cape Town).“They may not sell as many guidebooks as their A-list counterparts, but they have just as much charm and excitement – with way, way fewer tourists.”The weekly general interest magazine praises Durban’s “spectacular beaches” with their temperate Indian Ocean waters; the world-renowned aquarium at uShaka Marine World, “which is actually much larger than its Cape Town counterpart”; and the I Heart Market, which is held in the world-class Moses Mabhida stadium for its “hand-stitched leather iPad cases, tribal-print baseball caps, and mod vintage dresses by local artisans and collectors”.The city’s “vibrant blend” of Zulu, Indian and British influences means that the cuisine is more eclectic than Cape Town’s. Durban is well known locally for its curry – and the magazine urges visitors to try bunny chow, which is “messy curry served in a hollowed-out loaf of bread”.Other top spots highlighted by the magazine are the chic Oyster Box Hotel; Ile Maurice, where the crepes Suzettes are apparently unmissable; and Teremok Marine hotel in Umhlanga, which overlooks the harbour.Cape Town was recently named in the top three best destinations in the world to visit by Lonely Planet, the global travel publishers.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Hong Kong Airport forced to close for a second day

first_imgHong Kong Airport has been forced to close for a second-day reports NBC.NBC said that “all check-in services at Hong Kong airport’s main terminal shut down for a second day on Tuesday after protesters blocked the entrance of the building.”Arriving flights are not impacted.“Terminal operations at Hong Kong International Airport have been seriously disrupted as a result of the public assembly at the airport today,” the airport announced in a statement sent to reporters it says.All check-in service for departure flights were suspended at 4:30 p.m. the airport authority added. Other departure and arrival flights for the rest of the day would continue, it said.It told members of the public not to come to the airport.The shut down will cause massive knock-on disruptions for days particularly for Cathay Pacific Airways which will have many aircraft and crews out of position.The disruptions will also have a significant impact on forward bookings with intending or booked passengers changing plans to avoid Hong Kong.Hubs such as Singapore and Seoul and their airlines will be major beneficiaries.last_img read more

What Happens If You Get Caught Shoplifting? Well, It Varies.

first_imgShoplifting and larceny crimes cost retailers billions of dollars each year. Beyond the cost of the stolen merchandise, retail organizations must also consider costs hidden in processing the incident, following up with court proceedings, managing surveillance and security technologies, and dealing with lost sales and out-of-stocks.However, retailers have tools at their discretion to deal with these hefty losses. So what happens if a shoplifter gets caught shoplifting in 2019? What’s the standard process? It turns out the response to shoplifting has changed over the years, and retailers are continually debating the best way to handle the problem. There isn’t a single straightforward response to address all situations.Specific examples of the ways in which retailers today respond to criminal behavior are found throughout a feature article by Walter E. Palmer, CFI, CFE, and Jacque Brittain, LPC, who produced the piece for the January-February 2019 issue of LP Magazine. In the article, Palmer and Brittain talk about the way law enforcement reactions to shoplifting incidents have changed over the years:- Sponsor – In some instances, businesses have been threatened with fines or the intent to declare the retailer as a public nuisance due to the frequency of police calls made to deal with shoplifting and other criminal incidents. In other situations, police have asserted that they will not respond to theft incidents under a predetermined dollar amount. There are even those jurisdictions that have announced they simply won’t respond to shoplifting incidents at all, believing that police resources are better spent by focusing on “more serious crimes” other than those that cost retail companies tens of billions of dollars each and every year.For example, in March 2018, Chief Erika Shields of the Atlanta Police Department announced that officers will no longer be responding to shoplifting calls at department stores. “You can only do so much,” said Chief Shields. “We are going to change how we handle shoplifting calls, and primarily, for the most part, we will not be responding to them. Every time we make a shoplifting arrest, that officer is out of service for sixty to ninety minutes. It’s not acceptable.”The authors go on to discuss decriminalization and the recent reductions in sanctions for larceny, and what those decisions have meant to retailers throughout the United States. The article also touches on ramifications of the opioid epidemic and possibilities for alternative solutions that, ideally, will deter others when they see the reality of what happens if you get caught shoplifting. Check out the full article, “Shoplifting Response, Reaction, and Recourse,” to learn more.For more great LP content, visit the Table of Contents for theJanuary–February 2019 issue or register for a FREE print or digital subscription to the magazine. [Note: if you’re already a logged-in subscriber, the previous link will take you to the current issue instead.] Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more