Fishing boat crew safely rescued by Lough Swilly RNLI

first_imgLough Swilly lifeboat volunteers came to the aid of a fishing vessel during a successful mission off Fanad Head on Tuesday afternoon. The fishing boat was six nautical miles away from shore when it got into difficulty due to a fouled prop.The Lough Swilly ALB was launched at 1.10pm to assist the crew. Rescue volunteers attached a tow line to the vessel and landed them at Ballyhoorisky Pier in Fanad.The mission was a success and no injuries were reported.(Feature image via Lough Swilly RNLI.)   Fishing boat crew safely rescued by Lough Swilly RNLI was last modified: August 30th, 2018 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

DVC Monthly Preview – September 2018

first_imgShare This!Welcome to the September installment of our monthly Disney Vacation Club preview. This month, we discuss an extension for the Epcot member lounge and, in the Resort Spotlight, we’ll take a look at Animal Kingdom Villas Jambo House. Last month, we had news about DVC members being able to enter the Halloween party earlier than other guests (2 p.m. to be exact), and a DVC Explainer on banking, borrowing, and transferring points. You can view last month’s preview here.Booking WindowsThis month, here are some booking window dates to keep in mind. For your home resort (11-month booking window), in September, you will be able to book for dates in August 2019. For all other DVC resorts (seven-month booking window), this month you will be able to book for dates in April 2019.Saratoga Springs Resort is your best bet for last-minute availability, whether you’re using your own points or renting points. Two-bedroom and three-bedroom villas have the most availability, and on certain dates you can still find Treehouse Villa openings. (If you rent points through the affiliate link to David’s DVC rentals, TouringPlans receives a commission.) If you can manage the airfare to Hawaii, Aulani still has limited dates at DVC’s last-minute resort availability page.DVC NewsEpcot’s DVC member lounge.If you’re a fan of the member lounge at the Imagination Pavilion in Epcot’s Future World, good news: It’s returning for another year. It’s a great place to cool off during the heat of the day, with places to sit down, plug in your phone, and enjoy the complimentary snacks and drinks from Coke Freestyle machines. And for kids that need a technology fix, there are gaming stations and tablets available to use.If you blinked, you might have missed it, but a limited-time pop-up shop for DVC members opened within the Marketplace Co-op at Disney Springs. DVC announced the shop, featuring a variety of DVC merchandise and apparel, on August 13 and it closed on September 3. New patterns for Dooney & Bourke handbags and new designs for Member MagicBands were among the items on sale. If you missed it, many items from the collection are available online anytime at ShopDisney.com/DVC, as well as at select merchandise locations at Disney Vacation Club Resorts.Sabrina Soto hosts DVC’s “Behind The Magic” webcast.Disney Vacation Club is encouraging members to watch their latest webcast by offering the possibility of winning a stay at Copper Creek Villas & Cabins at Disney’s Wilderness Lodge. After watching the 24-minute “Behind the Magic” webcast, members are eligible to win a five-night stay in a one-bedroom villa. The prize includes park tickets for four and airfare. The webcast, hosted by HGTV’s Sabrina Soto, features looks at Toy Story Land at Disney’s Hollywood Studios, Pixar Pier at Disney’s California Adventure, and a preview of the Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge lands coming to both coasts. To view the webcast and enter the contest, visit dvcbehindthemagic.com. The webcast is available until September 30.If you missed out on resort guest registration for the Moonlight Magic events at Disney’s Hollywood Studios on September 19, September 26, and October 3, you have another chance to get in on the action. Registration opens to all members at 9 a.m. Eastern time, September 13. Registration goes very quickly, so if you want to attend, plan on being online at 9 a.m. sharp. The final Moonlight Magic event of 2018 will be November 15 at Disney’s California Adventure Park. Registration opens at 11 a.m. Eastern time on October 4.Registration is open for the Disney Vacation Club Halloween Party on October 31 at Disney’s Contemporary Resort. Inspired by The Haunted Mansion attraction, this event features desserts, snacks, and lemonade; character encounters; face painting; DJ music; a selfie station; games; and a keepsake photo. The two times for the parties are from 3-5 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Cost is $30 per person (ages 3 and up). Call Member Services at (800) 800-9800 to book.Resort SpotlightThe Animal Kingdom Villas is actually made up of two side-by-side resorts, Jambo House (which is partially DVC) and Kidani Village (which is all DVC). This month, we’ll focus on Jambo House.A view of the lobby from the fifth floor, where most of the Jambo House DVC rooms are.Jambo House is probably what most people think of when they think of Animal Kingdom Lodge, with its soaring lobby and expansive windows leading out to the savanna. The Animal Kingdom Lodge first opened in April 2001 as a conventional Disney resort. The Lodge’s fifth- and sixth-floor rooms were converted into DVC villas with Animal Kingdom Villas contracts going on sale in June 2007 at $104 per point. Kidani Village would open in 2009.Jambo House has 134 DVC units, comprising 216 maximum available rooms if you were to split the lockoffs. The value studios are 316 square feet and other studios are 365 square feet. Value one-bedrooms are 629 square feet with other 0ne-bedrooms 720 square feet. Value two-bedrooms are 945 square feet with other two-bedrooms 1,075 square feet. Three-bedroom grand villas check in at 2,349 square feet.The value units, which come at a lower point level, are some of the tougher-to-get DVC rooms due to the low inventory. Likewise, Club Level units are also low in supply and very difficult to book, even at 11 months out. Jambo House is the only DVC location at Walt Disney World that has Club Level accommodations. The rest of the units are divided by standard view and savanna view.Giraffes on the Arusha Savanna at Jambo House.The savannas, with giraffes, zebra, Ankole cattle, wildebeest, and other African animals are the big draw for the resort. Many guests refuse to stay anywhere but a savanna-view room. If you’re staying in standard-view room, you can still take advantage of the many viewing areas around the resort to do your animal watching. In the evening, you can venture down to the Uzima Savanna near the pool and find a cast member with night-vision goggles to see the animals at night.The Igbo Ijele mask in the Animal Kingdom Lodge Jambo House.Beyond the animals, you might not be aware of the museum-quality African art and artifacts on display. The resort is home to the largest collection of African art in North America. The centerpiece of their collection is the huge Igbo Ijele mask on display in the lobby. The 16-foot Ijele is created by the Igbo people of Nigeria and used at special celebrations only once every 10 to 25 years. This is the only known Ijele outside of Nigeria.Another great feature of staying at Jambo House is the excellent dining options. Jiko – The Cooking Place is their signature dining location and Boma is their buffet, both offering unique experiences featuring African dishes. The Mara is the quick service location and is where you can grab the popular zebra dome desserts outside of Boma. Victoria Falls is a beautiful lounge located on a mezzanine between the lobby and the lower restaurant level. The resort offers a free culinary tour each afternoon before dinner, where cast members will discuss the decor of Jiko and Boma in relation to their home countries and offer sample tastings.If you’re staying at Jambo House in the fall, you should be aware that the Uzima Springs pool is under refurbishment and is expected to be closed until December. Guests can still use the Samawati Springs pool at Kidani Village.All transportation from Jambo House is by bus, with Animal Kingdom being the closest park. The resort’s distance from the other Walt Disney World parks is a knock against it. There is a van service for transport between Jambo House and Kidani Village or it is a reasonable walk.Animal Kingdom Villas Jambo House may not have the prime location of the monorail resorts or the Crescent Lake resorts, but it’s absolutely unique in its theming and features. From the live animals wandering nearby to the cast members from Africa sharing stories from their countries, a stay at Jambo House is an experience onto its own that you can’t get anywhere else on property.Have you stayed at Jambo House recently, or is Animal Kingdom Villas your home resort? We’d love to hear your observations in the comments.last_img read more

LP Executives’ Family Members Tour Historic Bluffton, SC, at LPM Annual Meeting

first_imgWhile loss prevention retail and vendor executives were engaged in business meetings at the annual LP Magazine, LP Foundation, and RILA Asset Protection Leaders Council three-day event, sixteen family and guests of attendees were treated to a tour of nearby historic Bluffton, SC, sponsored by CAP Index and Zellman.The tour started with an hour-long boat ride down the May River through the unique South Carolina marshes with miles of oyster beds that wrap around the Bluffton area. Accompanied by beautiful sunshine, light breeze, and “refreshing” boat spray, the participants were welcomed by a resident dolphin, many egrets, and a hunting eagle.The May River cruise included educational facts provided by the boat captain about the flat, low country shoreline, including that there is a 10-foot tidal range that provides a lengthy oyster spawning season, natural oyster reefs grow in clusters versus individually, and why the oyster season takes place during the “R” months. The SC marshland ecosystem makes a perfect habitat for naturally growing abundant clusters of meaty, briny oysters.- Sponsor – The first stop was at the Bluffton Oyster Company—one of the last remaining companies harvesting naturally grown oysters—where their team of up to 27 pickers and shuckers process not only oysters, but also crab and shrimp.Church of the Cross, Bluffton, SCThe tour continued to historic Bluffton, a small Southern town classically decorated by tangled Spanish moss draping from century-old live oak trees and ferns hanging over wrap-around covered porches. The first stop in Bluffton was the Church of the Cross, a historic town landmark built in 1857. The participants then split into smaller groups to explore shops, art boutiques, farmer’s market booths, and chose a perfect spot for a leisurely lunch. All who went on the tour helped support the local economy by purchasing one or more treasured items from the local shops and vendors. Last, but certainly not least, all met new friends and enjoyed the camaraderie of the fun group of men and women.“I want to express how much I enjoyed this year’s family tour,” said Maureen Arigi, wife of Kroger executive Tom Arigi. “It is always great to see new and fun places and learn a bit about the local attractions. Even more important, I appreciate that family is included in the LPM annual meeting. Being part of the meeting allows me to meet with all the friends and business leaders Tom has worked with over the years. I know planning an event like the LPM annual meeting is no easy task. I appreciate those who worked so hard to make it a success!”John Vece, husband of Protos Security executive Kris Vece, said, “The family tour was a great way to meet and greet with other LP spouses. Together we took a boat tour from Hilton Head Island up to old town Bluffton, where we learned about local oyster harvesting, shopped, and enjoyed a nice lunch. It was a perfect day! Thank you for including me.” Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

Plasma transfusions can’t combat Ebola

first_imgDuring the darkest months of the West African Ebola epidemic in 2014, scientists were almost empty-handed. Hundreds of patients were dying every week; drugs and vaccines weren’t ready for testing. There was another strategy they could try, however: taking blood from people who had already survived Ebola and giving it to those who were sick. Blood from survivors is laden with antibodies against the virus that might just help new victims overcome Ebola as well. But a new study suggests the approach doesn’t work, and some scientists say it’s time to bury the idea and move on.Passive immunotherapy, as the strategy is called, has proven its merit with other diseases, including influenza and diphtheria, but whether it worked with Ebola was unknown. A study during the 1995 Ebola outbreak in Kikwit, in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo, showed that seven out of eight patients who received blood from survivors survived, but a later analysis showed that most of them received the transfusions late in their disease, when they were unlikely to die anyway. A 2007 study in which monkeys received convalescent blood showed no benefit. “Given these discouraging results and the risks of transmitting infection, whole-blood transfusions, even under desperate epidemic conditions, seem unwarranted,” the authors of that paper warned.When Ebola exploded in West Africa in 2014, and patients were dying in large numbers, the World Health Organization said it was worth trying anyway—especially because candidate drugs were in short supply.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The new study, led by researchers at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp, Belgium, and Guinea’s National Blood Transfusion Center, didn’t use blood but plasma—essentially blood minus the red blood cells. (The cells are given back to the donors.) The logistics were daunting: A huge blue bus chockful of equipment to obtain and process blood was shipped in from abroad. Survivors were mobilized and convinced to donate plasma—not an easy task in West Africa, where blood is a symbol of strength.The researchers hoped to recruit 130 patients; because the epidemic was already on the retreat when their study started, they managed to administer plasma to only 99 people, 15 of whom were excluded from the analysis for various reasons. (Guinea had its last Ebola case in October.) Because withholding a potential treatment was unacceptable to regulators and the local population, there was no placebo group, says lead author Johan van Griensven; instead, the control group was formed by 418 patients treated at the same center in the five previous months.Of the 84 patients eventually included in the plasma group, 31% died, compared with 38% in the control group—a difference of 7%. When the researchers adjusted the data to correct for patient age and virus levels in their blood, the difference shrunk to 3%, and it was no longer statistically significant, the team reports today in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).The researchers haven’t entirely given up on the idea that plasma might work, however. They didn’t determine the antibody levels in the plasma that they administered; those measurements are now being done at a high-level biosafety lab in France. It’s still possible that plasma from some donors with high levels of antibody—or particularly powerful antibodies—was effective, Van Griensven says. “This is not the end of the convalescent plasma story,” says Calum Semple, a clinical virologist at the University of Liverpool in the United Kingdom and a co-author on the study. (The fact that administering plasma was possible in the midst of an outbreak, and that the treatment was safe and acceptable to donors and patients, is an important feat in itself, he says.)The trial’s disappointing outcome is “not very surprising,” says virologist Thomas Geisbert of the University of Texas Medical Center in Galveston, one of the authors of the 2007 monkey study. He says doing the study didn’t make much sense in the first place, and now it’s time to let go of the idea altogether.Geisbert’s hopes are on treatments that did do well in animal studies, including a lab-made cocktail of antibodies called ZMapp that protected monkeys from Ebola. A field trial of ZMapp that has enrolled around 70 patients in Liberia, Guinea, Sierra Leone, and the United States is ongoing; whether that cohort is large enough to produce definitive results is still unclear.A second study published in NEJM today provides hints, but no solid evidence, about another strategy that might work against Ebola. The paper is based on a natural experiment: In August 2014, an Ebola treatment center in the Foya, in northern Liberia, ran out of the first-line malaria therapy, a combination called arthemeter-lumefantrin, that was given to all Ebola patients admitted to the center. For 12 days, until new supplies arrived, the center relied on another drug combo named artesunate-amodiaquine.As it happens, a screening published in 2013 showed that amodiaquine has anti-Ebola activity in the test tube. So researchers set out to see whether patients on the new malaria drugs had a higher chance of survival. They did: In the NEJM paper, the team shows that 51% of the patients died during the 12-day interval, compared to 64% of those in the periods before and after the stock-out.It’s not clear that amodiaquine saved patients from Ebola, however, the researchers write. One possibility is that the drug doesn’t do anything, but that arthemeter-lumefrantrine increases the risk of death instead. It’s also possible that the patients in the 12-day interval somehow differed from those who came earlier or later. Still, if malaria treatment is a standard component of Ebola care, artesenate-amodiaquine may be the better choice, the team writes. “It’s definitely an interesting finding,” says Robert Garry of Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana—but more work is needed on the anti-Ebola effects of amodiaquine, he says.last_img read more

Whatsapp drops 1 annual subscription

first_imgWhatsApp Chief Executive Jan Koum at the DLD (Digital-Life-Design) conference in Bavaria. Image Credit: WSJ Advertisement Popular mobile messaging service WhatsApp has announced that it will drop its US$0.99 (S$1.42) annual subscription fee, and be made available for free from now on.The Facebook-owned service, which has a user base of 900 million users worldwide, is a messaging service for mobile devices, and can also be used to make voice calls over a phone’s Internet connection. It recently allowed users to access the mobile service on the Google Chrome web browser.WhatsApp Chief Executive Jan Koum announced this at the DLD (Digital-Life-Design) conference in Bavaria. Previously, the company had offered some users a lifetime subscription for US$1, while the majority of users were offered the service free for the first year. – Advertisement – Some users had their free-use period extended several times in the last few years and have never had to pay for the service. In a blog post, the company conceded that its subscription-based business model had not been entirely successful.“For many years, we’ve asked some people to pay a fee for using WhatsApp after their first year. As we’ve grown, we’ve found that this approach hasn’t worked well,” noted WhatsApp in a blog post.“Many WhatsApp users don’t have a debit or credit card number and they worried they’d lose access to their friends and family after their first year. So over the next several weeks, we’ll remove fees from the different versions of our app and WhatsApp will no longer charge you for our service.”In an assurance to users, the company also promised that it will not start rolling out third-party advertisements to make up for the loss in subscription fees.Instead, it will look into partnering with companies, to open communication channels with its user base.[related-posts]“Starting this year, we will test tools that allow you to use WhatsApp to communicate with businesses and organisations that you want to hear from. That could mean communicating with your bank about whether a recent transaction was fraudulent, or with an airline about a delayed flight. We all get these messages elsewhere today – through text messages and phone calls – so we want to test new tools to make this easier to do on WhatsApp, while still giving you an experience without third-party ads and spam.”[StraitsTimes]last_img read more