Goldman Sachs predicts healthcare M&A flurry, helped by Donald Trump

Goldman Sachs predicts healthcare M&A flurry, helped by Donald Trump William Turvill by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryOne-N-Done | 7-Minute Workout7 Minutes a Day To a Flat Stomach By Using This 1 Easy ExerciseOne-N-Done | 7-Minute WorkoutMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailAtlantic MirrorA Kilimanjaro Discovery Has Proved This About The BibleAtlantic MirrorWarped SpeedCan You Name More State Capitals Than A 5th Grader? Find Out Now!Warped SpeedUnify Health LabsRandy Jackson: This 3 Minute Routine Transformed My HealthUnify Health LabsPensAndPatronTori Roloff Confirms Devastating News About The FamilyPensAndPatronZen HeraldEllen Got A Little Too Personal With Blake Shelton, So He Said ThisZen HeraldMaternity WeekAfter Céline Dion’s Major Weight Loss, She Confirms What We Suspected All AlongMaternity Week Wall Street giant Goldman Sachs is predicting a mergers and acquisitions (M&A) flurry in the healthcare sector this year, helped by Donald Trump.After a record 2015 for global M&A, there was a general slowdown in activity last year. The big pharmaceutical and biotech companies need more products in order to grow.They also have very, very big balance sheets. In the run-up to the US election, President-elect Trump pledged to lower the US business rate tax from 35 per cent to 15 per cent in order to encourage offshore firms to repatriate themselves.Read more: How boutiques have snatched bankers and M&A business from the heavyweightsRubin added: “These are companies that are also facing thinning pipelines, so they need new products.“And that, I think, is what will drive M&A activity.”She added: “At the same time, we expect a number of bolt-on deals, deals with smaller companies, technology-driven companies.” Share And if the Trump administration is to pass repatriation, a lot of cash will come back to the US. Jami Rubin, unit leader of Goldman’s healthcare research group, noted that activity in the sector was “lower than we thought it would be” in 2016, but is predicting a pick-up this year.Read more: After subdued 2016, these bankers are calling a 2017 bounceback for UK M&ADiscussing expectations for 2017, she said: Wednesday 18 January 2017 6:09 pm whatsapp whatsapp read more

Vince Cable calls Royal Mail share slump ‘vindicating’

first_imgThe former state monopoly is tussling in the courts with the Communication Workers Union (CWU) over strikes. Sunday 1 December 2019 3:48 pm On Thursday the CWU lost an appeal that sought to overturn a High Court injunction to stop strike action ahead of Christmas and the UK’s 12 December General Election. The CWU vowed to keep battling, however. whatsapp The move came a year after the job was abolished when chief executive of UK post and parcels Sue Whalley was ousted due to the arm’s poor performance. whatsapp Read more: Royal Mail: Court rejects appeal against ban on Christmas strike In September, Royal Mail appointed headhunters to search for a director to run its struggling UK operations. Former Lib Dem business secretary Sir Vince Cable has said he has been “vindicated” by the collapse in Royal Mail’s share price after his handling of the firm’s privatisation six years ago drew criticism. Yet the former Lib Dem leader added: “It’s been a big success in the sense that Royal Mail was in serious difficulty. In a world of email, Postman Pat is as much a part of us as the stagecoach. In order to do that the Royal Mail needed to borrow – it wasn’t going to come from the government.” Harry Robertson center_img The former Lib Dem leader was business secretary when Royal Mail floated (Getty Images) The coalition government was attacked at the time of the float for undervaluing Royal Mail after its shares soared by more than a third on the first day of trading. Read more: Royal Mail shares bleed red as strike threat puts profit in doubt Share Cable told the Sunday Telegraph: “What the share price shows you is that this wasn’t a very sound business. We knew that this was a business that was going to struggle.” More From Our Partners Native American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comBill Gates reportedly hoped Jeffrey Epstein would help him win a Nobelnypost.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.com Royal Mail has had a torrid 2019 that could be capped by industrial action by workers during the Christmas period. The firm’s share price has since tumbled back down to earth to sit around 50 per cent below its original price, at roughly 209p. Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May Likezenherald.comDolly Finally Took Off Her Wig, Fans Gaspedzenherald.comUndoNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableyUndoMisterStoryWoman files for divorce after seeing this photoMisterStoryUndobonvoyaged.comThese Celebs Are Complete Jerks In Real Life.bonvoyaged.comUndoPast Factory4 Sisters Take The Same Picture For 40 Years. Don’t Cry When You See The Last One!Past FactoryUndoDaily FunnyFunny Notes You Don’t Want To Get From Your NeighborDaily FunnyUndoAlphaCuteBizarre Hells Angels Rules, #10 Is MandatoryAlphaCuteUndoWorldLifeStyleVet Calls The Police When He Sees A Family’s Adopted DogWorldLifeStyleUndoGloriousaMother Set Up A Hidden Camera, Her Husband Was Caught In The Act…GloriousaUndo Sir Vince Cable calls Royal Mail share slump ‘vindicating’ last_img read more

Mosquito DNA altered to block malaria, not spread it

first_img An Anopheles stephensi mosquito, the main carrier of malaria in Asia, biting a human. Jim Gathany/CDC About the Author Reprints By Sharon Begley Nov. 23, 2015 Reprints [email protected] “We’re a hop, skip, and jump away from actual gene drive candidates for eventual release.” In the LabMosquito DNA altered to block malaria, not spread it Read more: Gene drive gives scientists the power to hijack evolutionThe technology used to engineer the insects has stirred controversy, however, because of fears it could alter ecosystems in unpredictable ways, and the National Academy of Sciences is studying it in order to come up with proposed regulations.The experiment, described in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, represents another achievement for CRISPR-Cas9, a powerful genome-editing tool that allows scientists to alter an organism’s DNA more quickly than anything before, and for “gene drive,” a technique that rapidly spreads a trait through more of a population than the conventional rules of inheritance allow.advertisement Why the FBI and Pentagon are afraid of this new genetic technology What is a gene drive?Volume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2015/11/23/malaria-mosquitoes-gene-drive-crispr/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0001:4101:41  “This is a major advance,” said biologist Kevin Esvelt of Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, who has done pioneering work in gene drive and led efforts to conduct such research safely. “It shows that gene drive interventions will likely be effective” against mosquito-borne diseases.If so, it’s an advance that may set a speed record in biology.Last December, biologists Ethan Bier and Valentino Gantz of the University of California, San Diego, got a gene drive to work in fruit flies, the first time anyone had accomplished that in insects. (Esvelt and his colleagues did it in yeast a few months before.) Rather than half of fruit flies inheriting yellow coloring when only one parent had it, as standard genetics predicts, 97 percent of offspring did. Related: Kevin Esvelt Harvard Universitycenter_img Gene drive works like an embedded Sorcerer’s Apprentice, making copy after copy of the inserted genes. When an engineered mosquito mates with a regular one, their offspring inherit the whole gene-editing package (including antimalaria genes and red-coloring genes) from the engineered parent. They inherit regular DNA from the other parent. But the gene drive cuts the regular DNA; in response, the genome repairs itself with the antimalaria and other inserted genes. Result: offspring with two copies of these genes. Like Mickey Mouse’s brooms, one becomes two over and over again.When such insects mate with regular ones, the same process of making two copies of the edited genes is repeated, and eventually all the progeny carry double doses of antimalaria genes.The scientists had their doubts that it would work. “We did a tremendous amount of guessing” about the right genes to insert, James said. “No one had ever shown that some of these genes would function as we hoped.” There were also concerns that the Cas9 portion of the CRISPR gene-editing system was toxic to mosquitoes.It wasn’t. Hundreds of the engineered mosquitoes survived to adulthood. The UC scientists mated a few with regular mosquitoes, and by the third generation, 99 percent of offspring were glowing red: nearly all had inherited the antimalaria genes.The next steps are to confirm that the antimalaria antibodies produced by the inserted genes really do neutralize the malaria parasite. James had shown that in earlier experiments using standard genetic engineering, but in the gene-drive study the scientists didn’t test for it.Researchers not involved in the study nevertheless expressed high hopes for it. “It is quite possible that this technology would become an important tool in the control of malaria,” said geneticist Peter Atkinson of the University of California, Riverside, whose research involves genetic approaches to controlling insect pests. “It would constitute a very, very significant advance in the field.”In July, the UC scientists and two dozen other researchers released a public letter committing themselves to conducting gene-drive experiments only in secure facilities, to ensure engineered organisms didn’t escape. “This experiment is intrinsically much less likely than fruit flies to accidentally spread, since [the Asian malaria mosquito] does not breed in California,” said Harvard biologist George Church, who signed the letter and, with Esvelt, has applied for a patent on gene drive. But Esvelt said he would have liked the California team to develop a “reversal drive,” which could undo the genetic changes their gene drive produced, “just in case something did go wrong.”More needs to be done before scientists release malaria mosquitoes with gene drive even into large enclosures, let alone into the environment. They need to show that antimalaria gene drive works in the diverse populations of mosquitoes in nature, not just laboratory breeds, and that the malaria-blocking trait really works to keep Plasmodium out of the insects’ salivary glands.The Californians will have company making that happen. Church’s lab, collaborating with several Harvard colleagues, has made “progress on a similar CRISPR approach in the dominant African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae,” he told STAT. Sharon Begley The biggest hurdle to field trials might have nothing to do with science, but with convincing the public, especially in countries where malaria is endemic, that gene drive is safe.Experts trying to develop guidelines for use of gene drive technology had better hurry. The field is barreling ahead, and the mosquito experiment, said Esvelt, “suggests that we’re a hop, skip, and jump away from actual gene drive candidates for eventual release.” 45 CRISPR publications from 2002 to 2009 20022003200420052006200720082009201020112012201320142015 The UCSD duo called it a “mutagenic chain reaction” and applied for a patent on it. Early this year they began collaborating with Anthony James of the University of California, Irvine, who for nearly 20 years has sought genetic techniques to eradicate malaria.James’ change-the-mosquitoes strategy stems from the failure of an alternative approach to eradicate malaria — killing mosquitoes, as with DDT — and takes a page from spycraft: Rather than destroying the enemy, turn mosquitoes into biological double agents that block the malaria parasite instead of transmitting it.“The real enemy is the parasite, not the mosquito,” said James, who led the new research. With this breakthrough “we can recruit the mosquito to help us out.”Throwing a bag over its headFor the new study, Gantz used CRISPR-Cas9 to insert a package of new genes into 680 embryos of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes, the main carrier of malaria in Asia.Two of the genes make antibodies that attack the malaria parasite, Plasmodium. When James slipped such genes into mosquitoes in a 2012 study, in the days before CRISPR and gene drive, the resulting antibodies were so effective that the mosquitoes had no Plasmodium in their salivary glands, and so couldn’t transmit the disease if they bit people.“The antibodies interact with molecules on the surface of the parasite in a way that’s like throwing a bag over its head,” James said. “The parasite can’t ‘see’ the insect tissue, so there’s no parasite in the salivary glands.”Ordinarily, as genetically engineered mosquitoes mate with regular ones, traits like antimalaria antibodies are inherited by only half the offspring. The new genes eventually get washed out.The California team, therefore, also inserted the genome-editing CRISPR system into the mosquitoes’ genomes. This was the gene drive. They also dropped in a gene that makes a glowing red pigment, allowing the scientists to tell at a glance whether the gene drive was working: red meant success. Senior Writer, Science and Discovery (1956-2021) Sharon covered science and discovery. Scientists have used a revolutionary genetic tool to create mosquitoes unable to spread malaria, raising the possibility that lab-engineered insects could be released into the wild to stop a scourge that kills more than half a million people a year.A team from the University of California reported Monday that they inserted genes into mosquitoes designed to block the parasite that carries malaria, and that within a few generations virtually all the insects’ descendants had inherited the antimalaria DNA.If the technique works in nature as it did in the lab, releasing just a few thousand of the genetically modified mosquitoes to mate with regular mosquitoes could, within months, produce an entire population unable to transmit the disease to people.advertisement @sxbegle Tags genome editingglobal healthmalarialast_img read more

India boosts pharma by rejecting license for generic diabetes drug

first_imgPharmalotIndia boosts pharma by rejecting license for generic diabetes drug Ed Silverman For these reasons, the rejection of the Lee Pharma application is seen as “very significant,” said Vince Suneja, chief executive of TwoFour Insight Group, a consulting firm that works with Indian drug makers. “There have been multiple attempts in India for such licenses, but so far only one has been granted.” Meanwhile, he noted, the country is trying to attract investment and appease US concerns about patent rights.As for Lee Pharma, we asked the company for comment and will update you accordingly, although an attorney for the drug maker told The Business Standard that an appeal will be filed.For now, though, it remains unclear whether this decision alters industry perception of the Indian government and its willingness to protect patent rights. This is, after all, just one decision. And despite government willingness to accommodate industry concerns, the US Trade Representative may still place India on its next annual priority watch list for countries that fail to sufficiently protect and enforce patent rights. The pharmaceutical industry received a lift Wednesday when the Indian Patent Office rejected an application from a domestic company that sought a compulsory license to make a generic version of a brand-name medicine. In this case, Lee Pharma hoped to sell a lower-cost version of Onglyza, a diabetes pill sold by AstraZeneca.The decision was being closely watched as global drug makers look for signs that the Indian government will alter its approach toward protecting patent rights. Countries can issue compulsory licenses to a generic drug maker allowing it to copy a patented medicine without the consent of the pharmaceutical company that owns the patent. This right was spelled out in a World Trade Organization agreement.One argument for pursuing — and issuing — a compulsory license is affordability. Thailand took this step several years ago to lower costs for different medicines and, more recently, India issued a license as well. But the pharmaceutical industry worries that the Indian government is willing to consider issuing licenses as a way to bolster its own generic drug makers as much as widen access to medicines.advertisement But some patient advocacy groups argue that some efforts to enforce intellectual property rights may come at the expense of patients who cannot afford medicines. When it filed its application last June, Lee Pharma argued a compulsory license was warranted on the grounds that Onglyza was not sold at an affordable price in India and that supplies were inadequate. Tags compulsory licensegeneric drugspatents By Ed Silverman Jan. 21, 2016 Reprints Related: One reason for high drug prices: a huge backlog of unapproved generic drugs About the Author Reprints Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. The tactic has had mixed success in India. Two years ago, the Indian Supreme Court rejected a bid by Bayer to block the government from issuing a license to generic company to make a lower-cost version of its Nexavar kidney cancer drug from being sold. But the patent office also rejected an application by BDR Pharmaceuticals to make a version of a Bristol-Myers Squibb cancer drug known as Sprycel.advertisement @Pharmalot The pharmaceutical industry worries that the Indian government is willing to consider issuing compulsory licenses as a way to bolster its own generic drug makers. Rafiq Maqbool/AP [email protected] last_img read more

Novartis CEO Vas Narasimhan on gene therapy, innovation, and the company pivot

first_img When the drug maker Novartis announced last month that it would cut 2,200 jobs, it framed the decision not as a retreat but as a restructuring. The goal, CEO Vas Narasimhan said, was to reshape the company to focus on “specialized and more personalized innovative medicines.”Out with the company’s contact lens business, in with cancer immunotherapy. GET STARTED What is it? By Karen Weintraub Oct. 29, 2018 Reprints Business Karen Weintraub What’s included? Novartis CEO Vas Narasimhan on gene therapy, innovation, and the company pivot STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. About the Author Reprints Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. @kweintraub Unlock this article — plus daily market-moving biopharma analysis — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Tags biotechnologycancerfinancepharmaeuticalsSTAT+ Karen Weintraub is an independenthealth/sciencejournalist, journalism teacher, and bookauthor. Log In | Learn More Novartis CEO Vas Narasimhan Alissa Ambrose/STATlast_img read more

Bank branches retain their appeal

first_img The majority of Canadians haven’t lost their connection with their local bank branch. New research from global market research firm Mintel reveals that more than eight in 10 (86%) Canadian bank consumers have visited a branch in the past year, with one quarter (25%) saying they visit their local branch more than once a month on average. Bank building exterior and interior poemsuk/123RF Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Share this article and your comments with peers on social media The country’s oldest and youngest consumers are more likely than Canadians overall to be frequent visitors to their local branch as three in 10 (29%). Younger millennials (aged 24-31) and baby boomers (aged 54-72) say they visit their local branch more than once a month on average.While Canadians young and old are frequenting their neighbourhood bank branch, their reasons for doing so are quite different. Older bank consumers aged 55+ are the most likely age group to visit their branch for financial planning advice (20% vs 16% of Canadians overall) and to buy investment products (16% vs 11% overall). Meanwhile, younger bank consumers aged 18-24 are most likely to visit their bank branch for money transfers (33% vs 21% overall), to open an account (26% vs 13% overall) and to apply for a credit card (20% vs 9% overall).Younger Canadians represent a prime target for bank branches as they are the most likely consumers to be increasing their visits. In fact, more than one quarter (28%) of bank consumers aged 18-24 say that they find themselves visiting their local branch more as they get older, compared to just 13% of consumers overall.“The branch network can play a critical role in building relationships, enhancing trust, providing financial advice and easing the transition to digital channels,” says Sanjay Sharma, senior financial services analyst at Mintel, in a statement.“We see that younger consumers are increasing the frequency of their visits to banks likely because they are relatively inexperienced in financial matters and have weaker credit histories, resulting in a desire to learn about their finances in-person. However, brands should avoid marginalizing older customers through mass reduction of human personnel as baby boomers are some of the most likely visitors of their bank branch as they are typically more affluent and seeking financial planning and investment advice,” he continues. While more than half (54%) of bank consumers say they prefer to look online for answers about their financial accounts rather than visit a branch, many consumers agree that some things are better handled in person. In fact, nearly three quarters (72%) of bank consumers agree that they would prefer to buy more complex products at a branch rather than online, and 68% say they would be more likely to buy new financial products/services at their local branch than through call centre sales.last_img read more

SEC enforcement drops

first_img Facebook LinkedIn Twitter James Langton Keywords EnforcementCompanies Securities and Exchange Commission Most of the drop came in stand-alone SEC actions, which dropped from 526 cases in 2019 to just 405 in fiscal 2020.The number of follow-on administrative proceedings also declined from last year, while delinquent filings were essentially unchanged.For the SEC’s stand-alone actions, the top issue was securities offerings (32%), followed by investment advisory and investment company issues (21%), and issuer reporting/accounting and auditing cases (15%).While the volume of cases was down notably from last year, the quantum of penalties and disgorgement imposed by the SEC in fiscal 2020 edged higher by about 8%.The SEC ordered $3.6 billion (all figures in U.S. dollars) in disgorgement in fiscal 2020, up from $3.3 billion in the previous year. Total penalties were essentially unchanged at US$1.1 billion.During the year, the SEC also returned more than $600 million to harmed investors, and it paid out a record $175 million to 39 whistleblowers. Enforcement activity by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) plunged in fiscal 2020, according to the enforcement division’s latest annual report.The SEC published a report Monday showing that the number of cases it brought dropped to 715 in fiscal 2020 (year end Sept. 30) from 862 in fiscal 2019. Businessman Blowing Whistle Isolated on White Background EHStock/iStock PwC alleges deleted emails, unusual transactions in Bridging Finance case Share this article and your comments with peers on social media BFI investors plead for firm’s sale Mouth mechanic turned market manipulator Related newslast_img read more

Judge Joe Brown Wants to Assist Jamaican Youth

first_imgAdvertisements RelatedJudge Joe Brown Wants to Assist Jamaican Youth RelatedJudge Joe Brown Wants to Assist Jamaican Youth Judge Joe Brown Wants to Assist Jamaican Youth UncategorizedDecember 1, 2008center_img RelatedJudge Joe Brown Wants to Assist Jamaican Youth FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Judge Joe Brown, the non-traditional presiding judge of the syndicated reality American courtroom TV show, Judge Joe Brown, has given a commitment to work with the Government of Jamaica in developing programmes to help re-socialise and motivate young people, especially young men.Judge Joe Brown gave his commitment when he paid a courtesy call on Prime Minister Bruce Golding, at Jamaica House Thursday, November 27. The judge was in the island as guest speaker at the graduation ceremony of the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts, held at the Courtleigh Auditorium on November 29. He was also a special guest at the Prime Minister’s Youth Awards for Excellence, on Sunday, November 30, at the Emancipation Park in Kingston.Prime Minister Bruce Golding yesterday received a courtesy call at Jamaica House from Judge Joe Brown, the non-traditional presiding judge of the syndicated reality courtroom show Judge Joe Brown. Judge Joe Brown is in Jamaica as guest speaker at the graduation ceremony of the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts on November 29 at the Courtleigh Auditorium. During their discussions the Judge gave a commitment to PM Golding to play his part in assisting Jamaica with programmes to motivate young men.In their exchange of ideas, Judge Joe Brown spoke of his successful disruptive kids programmes through which the lives of many young men have been transformed. Prime Minister Golding also took the opportunity to outline a number of initiatives being undertaken by Government as part of its national transformation programme. These initiatives he said would focus on parenting, more emphasis on education, law enforcement and the co-ordination of the work of the various Government and non-government agencies which impact on the lives of people at the community level for greater effectiveness.Also participating in the meeting were the Minister of Information Culture, Youth and Sports, Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange, the Principal of the Edna Manley College, Mr. Burchell Duhaney and Mrs. Deborah Brown, wife of Judge Joe Brown.last_img read more

UOW recognised as a ‘Champion’ of Women in STEM

first_imgUOW recognised as a ‘Champion’ of Women in STEM University committed to gender equity in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicineThe University of Wollongong (UOW) has been recognised as a national Women in STEM Decadal Plan Champion by the Australian Academy of Science (AAS), reaffirming the University’s commitment to gender equity.The AAS in collaboration with the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering (AATE) developed the Women in STEM Decadal Plan to offer a vision and opportunities to guide organisations as they work towards achieving gender equality in Australia’s STEM sector by 2030.UOW was recognised as a Women in STEM Decadal Plan Champion after submitting its response to the Plan to the AAS.As a Champion of the Women in STEM Decadal Plan, UOW is committed to advancing gender equity in academia, and promoting science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine as career choices for women and girls.The “STEMM” skills (UOW includes medicine as well as science, technology, engineering, mathematics as an area of focus in the University’s gender equality efforts) are the foundation on which the Australian workforce, industries and the economy will thrive in coming decades.Demand for a STEMM-skilled workforce will continue to grow over that period as automation based on big data, the internet of things, and artificial intelligence are adopted widely across all industries.To meet this demand and to build the strongest STEMM workforce possible to support Australia’s prosperity, the government, academia, industry and the education sector need to tackle the significant under-representation of women in STEMM.UOW Vice-Chancellor Professor Paul Wellings CBE said gender equality was critical to an organisation’s success and crucial for society as a whole.“As UOW’s Vice-Chancellor, I am continually working to ensure that this message is conveyed to all staff and students, particularly in the traditionally male-focused STEMM disciplines,” Professor Wellings said.“All people working at UOW should feel they are able to access and enjoy the same rewards, resources and opportunities regardless of gender. We are proud that the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA) recognises UOW as an Employer of Choice for Gender Equality.“Gender equality and gender pay equity is, and will continue to be, a priority at UOW.”The Women in STEM Decadal Plan outlines six opportunities for organisations to advance gender equity: leadership and cohesion; evaluation; workplace culture; visibility; education; and industry action.The UOW Response to the Plan summarises the progress the University has made in each of those areas and the ways in which the University will continue to work towards gender equality over the next decade.UOW Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research & Innovation) Professor Jennifer L Martin AC has long been an advocate for gender equity in STEMM. She was a founding member of the Science in Australia Gender Equity (SAGE) Steering Committee that established the Athena SWAN pilot to address gender equity in science, technology, engineering, maths and medicine, and a member of the NHMRC Women in Health Sciences Committee.Professor Martin pointed to the 2020-2025 UOW Research and Innovation Strategy, developed and launched this year, as an example of the University’s efforts to advance gender equity.“A strategic objective of our Research and Innovation Strategy is to address historical inequities by increasing the diversity of academic appointments, including women, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers and other under-represented groups,” she said.“This year the University has appointed Associate Deans in Equity, Diversity and Inclusion in every faculty, and we are introducing training and governance structures that embed and uphold best practice principles of research integrity; equity, diversity and inclusion.”The UOW Response to the Women in STEM Decadal Plan is published here. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, artificial intelligence, Australia, Australian, Australian Academy of Science, Engineering, gender equality, Government, intelligence, mathematics, stem, university, University of Wollongong, UOW, Wollongong, Workplace Gender Equality Agencylast_img read more

Court decision clarifies pharmacy assistants are covered by Shop and Warehouse Award

first_imgCourt decision clarifies pharmacy assistants are covered by Shop and Warehouse Award Award coverage for pharmacy assistants employed by businesses in the state industrial relations system has long been a complex and contested issue.On 3 May 2021, the Western Australian Industrial Appeals Court issued a decision determining that the state Shop and Warehouse (Wholesale and Retail Establishments) Award does cover pharmacy assistants. This decision is available on the WA Industrial Relations Commission website.Information about the current pay rates and entitlements for pharmacy assistants under the Shop and Warehouse Award is available on the WA award summaries page of the Wageline website.Alternatively, you can contact Wageline on 1300 655 266. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:appeals court, Australia, Australian, Award, Commission, court, Government, industrial, Industry regulation, pharmacy, Retail, WA, website, Western Australialast_img read more