Mosquito DNA altered to block malaria, not spread it

first_img An Anopheles stephensi mosquito, the main carrier of malaria in Asia, biting a human. Jim Gathany/CDC About the Author Reprints By Sharon Begley Nov. 23, 2015 Reprints [email protected] “We’re a hop, skip, and jump away from actual gene drive candidates for eventual release.” In the LabMosquito DNA altered to block malaria, not spread it Read more: Gene drive gives scientists the power to hijack evolutionThe technology used to engineer the insects has stirred controversy, however, because of fears it could alter ecosystems in unpredictable ways, and the National Academy of Sciences is studying it in order to come up with proposed regulations.The experiment, described in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, represents another achievement for CRISPR-Cas9, a powerful genome-editing tool that allows scientists to alter an organism’s DNA more quickly than anything before, and for “gene drive,” a technique that rapidly spreads a trait through more of a population than the conventional rules of inheritance allow.advertisement Why the FBI and Pentagon are afraid of this new genetic technology What is a gene drive?Volume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2015/11/23/malaria-mosquitoes-gene-drive-crispr/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0001:4101:41  “This is a major advance,” said biologist Kevin Esvelt of Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, who has done pioneering work in gene drive and led efforts to conduct such research safely. “It shows that gene drive interventions will likely be effective” against mosquito-borne diseases.If so, it’s an advance that may set a speed record in biology.Last December, biologists Ethan Bier and Valentino Gantz of the University of California, San Diego, got a gene drive to work in fruit flies, the first time anyone had accomplished that in insects. (Esvelt and his colleagues did it in yeast a few months before.) Rather than half of fruit flies inheriting yellow coloring when only one parent had it, as standard genetics predicts, 97 percent of offspring did. Related: Kevin Esvelt Harvard Universitycenter_img Gene drive works like an embedded Sorcerer’s Apprentice, making copy after copy of the inserted genes. When an engineered mosquito mates with a regular one, their offspring inherit the whole gene-editing package (including antimalaria genes and red-coloring genes) from the engineered parent. They inherit regular DNA from the other parent. But the gene drive cuts the regular DNA; in response, the genome repairs itself with the antimalaria and other inserted genes. Result: offspring with two copies of these genes. Like Mickey Mouse’s brooms, one becomes two over and over again.When such insects mate with regular ones, the same process of making two copies of the edited genes is repeated, and eventually all the progeny carry double doses of antimalaria genes.The scientists had their doubts that it would work. “We did a tremendous amount of guessing” about the right genes to insert, James said. “No one had ever shown that some of these genes would function as we hoped.” There were also concerns that the Cas9 portion of the CRISPR gene-editing system was toxic to mosquitoes.It wasn’t. Hundreds of the engineered mosquitoes survived to adulthood. The UC scientists mated a few with regular mosquitoes, and by the third generation, 99 percent of offspring were glowing red: nearly all had inherited the antimalaria genes.The next steps are to confirm that the antimalaria antibodies produced by the inserted genes really do neutralize the malaria parasite. James had shown that in earlier experiments using standard genetic engineering, but in the gene-drive study the scientists didn’t test for it.Researchers not involved in the study nevertheless expressed high hopes for it. “It is quite possible that this technology would become an important tool in the control of malaria,” said geneticist Peter Atkinson of the University of California, Riverside, whose research involves genetic approaches to controlling insect pests. “It would constitute a very, very significant advance in the field.”In July, the UC scientists and two dozen other researchers released a public letter committing themselves to conducting gene-drive experiments only in secure facilities, to ensure engineered organisms didn’t escape. “This experiment is intrinsically much less likely than fruit flies to accidentally spread, since [the Asian malaria mosquito] does not breed in California,” said Harvard biologist George Church, who signed the letter and, with Esvelt, has applied for a patent on gene drive. But Esvelt said he would have liked the California team to develop a “reversal drive,” which could undo the genetic changes their gene drive produced, “just in case something did go wrong.”More needs to be done before scientists release malaria mosquitoes with gene drive even into large enclosures, let alone into the environment. They need to show that antimalaria gene drive works in the diverse populations of mosquitoes in nature, not just laboratory breeds, and that the malaria-blocking trait really works to keep Plasmodium out of the insects’ salivary glands.The Californians will have company making that happen. Church’s lab, collaborating with several Harvard colleagues, has made “progress on a similar CRISPR approach in the dominant African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae,” he told STAT. Sharon Begley The biggest hurdle to field trials might have nothing to do with science, but with convincing the public, especially in countries where malaria is endemic, that gene drive is safe.Experts trying to develop guidelines for use of gene drive technology had better hurry. The field is barreling ahead, and the mosquito experiment, said Esvelt, “suggests that we’re a hop, skip, and jump away from actual gene drive candidates for eventual release.” 45 CRISPR publications from 2002 to 2009 20022003200420052006200720082009201020112012201320142015 The UCSD duo called it a “mutagenic chain reaction” and applied for a patent on it. Early this year they began collaborating with Anthony James of the University of California, Irvine, who for nearly 20 years has sought genetic techniques to eradicate malaria.James’ change-the-mosquitoes strategy stems from the failure of an alternative approach to eradicate malaria — killing mosquitoes, as with DDT — and takes a page from spycraft: Rather than destroying the enemy, turn mosquitoes into biological double agents that block the malaria parasite instead of transmitting it.“The real enemy is the parasite, not the mosquito,” said James, who led the new research. With this breakthrough “we can recruit the mosquito to help us out.”Throwing a bag over its headFor the new study, Gantz used CRISPR-Cas9 to insert a package of new genes into 680 embryos of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes, the main carrier of malaria in Asia.Two of the genes make antibodies that attack the malaria parasite, Plasmodium. When James slipped such genes into mosquitoes in a 2012 study, in the days before CRISPR and gene drive, the resulting antibodies were so effective that the mosquitoes had no Plasmodium in their salivary glands, and so couldn’t transmit the disease if they bit people.“The antibodies interact with molecules on the surface of the parasite in a way that’s like throwing a bag over its head,” James said. “The parasite can’t ‘see’ the insect tissue, so there’s no parasite in the salivary glands.”Ordinarily, as genetically engineered mosquitoes mate with regular ones, traits like antimalaria antibodies are inherited by only half the offspring. The new genes eventually get washed out.The California team, therefore, also inserted the genome-editing CRISPR system into the mosquitoes’ genomes. This was the gene drive. They also dropped in a gene that makes a glowing red pigment, allowing the scientists to tell at a glance whether the gene drive was working: red meant success. Senior Writer, Science and Discovery (1956-2021) Sharon covered science and discovery. Scientists have used a revolutionary genetic tool to create mosquitoes unable to spread malaria, raising the possibility that lab-engineered insects could be released into the wild to stop a scourge that kills more than half a million people a year.A team from the University of California reported Monday that they inserted genes into mosquitoes designed to block the parasite that carries malaria, and that within a few generations virtually all the insects’ descendants had inherited the antimalaria DNA.If the technique works in nature as it did in the lab, releasing just a few thousand of the genetically modified mosquitoes to mate with regular mosquitoes could, within months, produce an entire population unable to transmit the disease to people.advertisement @sxbegle Tags genome editingglobal healthmalarialast_img read more

India boosts pharma by rejecting license for generic diabetes drug

first_imgPharmalotIndia boosts pharma by rejecting license for generic diabetes drug Ed Silverman For these reasons, the rejection of the Lee Pharma application is seen as “very significant,” said Vince Suneja, chief executive of TwoFour Insight Group, a consulting firm that works with Indian drug makers. “There have been multiple attempts in India for such licenses, but so far only one has been granted.” Meanwhile, he noted, the country is trying to attract investment and appease US concerns about patent rights.As for Lee Pharma, we asked the company for comment and will update you accordingly, although an attorney for the drug maker told The Business Standard that an appeal will be filed.For now, though, it remains unclear whether this decision alters industry perception of the Indian government and its willingness to protect patent rights. This is, after all, just one decision. And despite government willingness to accommodate industry concerns, the US Trade Representative may still place India on its next annual priority watch list for countries that fail to sufficiently protect and enforce patent rights. The pharmaceutical industry received a lift Wednesday when the Indian Patent Office rejected an application from a domestic company that sought a compulsory license to make a generic version of a brand-name medicine. In this case, Lee Pharma hoped to sell a lower-cost version of Onglyza, a diabetes pill sold by AstraZeneca.The decision was being closely watched as global drug makers look for signs that the Indian government will alter its approach toward protecting patent rights. Countries can issue compulsory licenses to a generic drug maker allowing it to copy a patented medicine without the consent of the pharmaceutical company that owns the patent. This right was spelled out in a World Trade Organization agreement.One argument for pursuing — and issuing — a compulsory license is affordability. Thailand took this step several years ago to lower costs for different medicines and, more recently, India issued a license as well. But the pharmaceutical industry worries that the Indian government is willing to consider issuing licenses as a way to bolster its own generic drug makers as much as widen access to medicines.advertisement But some patient advocacy groups argue that some efforts to enforce intellectual property rights may come at the expense of patients who cannot afford medicines. When it filed its application last June, Lee Pharma argued a compulsory license was warranted on the grounds that Onglyza was not sold at an affordable price in India and that supplies were inadequate. Tags compulsory licensegeneric drugspatents By Ed Silverman Jan. 21, 2016 Reprints Related: One reason for high drug prices: a huge backlog of unapproved generic drugs About the Author Reprints Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. The tactic has had mixed success in India. Two years ago, the Indian Supreme Court rejected a bid by Bayer to block the government from issuing a license to generic company to make a lower-cost version of its Nexavar kidney cancer drug from being sold. But the patent office also rejected an application by BDR Pharmaceuticals to make a version of a Bristol-Myers Squibb cancer drug known as Sprycel.advertisement @Pharmalot The pharmaceutical industry worries that the Indian government is willing to consider issuing compulsory licenses as a way to bolster its own generic drug makers. Rafiq Maqbool/AP [email protected] last_img read more

How a blood test changed my life and helped me become a rare disease advocate

first_img Christopher Anselmo, who has a rare muscle disease, is studying for his MBA at Boston College. Kayana Szymczak for STAT Christopher Anselmo A rare disease killed her mother. Can this scientist save herself? About the Author Reprints What made it so difficult was the feeling of isolation. I no longer felt like I belonged to the world of the able-bodied. Worse, I didn’t know anyone who truly understood my situation.After growing tired of sulking, I slowly picked myself up. I decided to focus on what this disease could not take away from me. One event that helped me was a conference I attended in 2013 sponsored by the Jain Foundation — an organization whose mission is to find a cure for my disease. There I finally met other people with dysferlinopathy.It was an uplifting experience, one that I wish happened years earlier. These people got it — they knew what it felt like to go from ability to disability right when the whole world was finally at your fingertips. I didn’t have to explain to them what I was feeling; they understood just through eye contact and a handshake. First OpinionHow a blood test changed my life and helped me become a rare disease advocate The rest of that year, my senior year of high school, was a long, frustrating diagnostic odyssey. It took 10 months to confirm I had dysferlinopathy. I thought it was an odd diagnosis, since I felt perfectly healthy and loved to play basketball.Since there aren’t any treatments for dysferlinopathy, it was only a matter of time before symptoms appeared. When they did, announcing the appearance of the disease with fatigue and falls, my life dissolved into turmoil. The physical challenges were formidable, but the mental challenges were often worse. I suffered from panic attacks and fell into a deep depression.advertisement Kathy Giusti: The businesswoman who took on her own cancer Tags dysferlinopathymuscular dystrophyrare diseases Being an advocate for my disease has pushed me toward a career in health care. One goal that dysferlinopathy could not take away from me was to get my MBA. I’m now enrolled in the graduate school of management at Boston College, graduating in May. It is not the easiest campus to navigate with a muscle disease, but I am not letting logistics get in the way of my goals.Over the years, I have met many other people who are living with rare diseases of their own. No one wants to be in this club. But once you are ready to accept membership, I’ve found that there is a community out there who will embrace you with open arms.On Monday I’m marking Rare Disease Day by speaking at a ceremony at the Massachusetts State House. This celebration is a great reminder that when all of us with rare and mystifying diseases are put together, we are one big community, and we are not alone on this journey.Christopher Anselmo is a student in the Carroll School of Management at Boston College. He blogs at sidewalksandstairwells.com. By Christopher Anselmo Feb. 29, 2016 Reprints Related: A car crash changed my life. The accident itself hardly mattered — I walked away sore but unhurt. Instead, a post-crash blood test sounded an early warning for a rare disease that would spin my life in directions I could never have anticipated.I have dysferlinopathy, also known as Miyoshi myopathy and distal muscular dystrophy. My body has trouble making a protein called dysferlin, which is needed to build and repair muscle tissue. Without functional dysferlin, the muscles in my body have been wasting away for the last eight years, when I first started experiencing symptoms.My journey with this rare disease — it affects about four people in a million — started with a car crash in my hometown of West Hartford, Conn., in 2003. A pickup truck plowed into the passenger side of my friend’s car, where I was sitting. Somehow, I emerged uninjured. But routine tests in the emergency room showed an alarming amount of creatine kinase, a marker of muscle damage, in my bloodstream. Instead of hovering around 200, my level was in the tens of thousands.advertisement @Chris_Anselmo Related:last_img read more

Pharmalot, Pharmalittle: Rising prices for combo cancer drugs pose a dilemma

first_img [email protected] About the Author Reprints Tags cancerdrug pricesopioids @Pharmalot Prices for cancer treatments are less affordable in low- and middle-income countries than in the US, STAT writes about a new study. Affordability was calculated as a percentage of per capita gross domestic product needed to pay for a month’s supply of the median-priced drug. Cancer patients in Australia pay 71 percent of their monthly economic output for a month’s supply, 313 percent in India, 286 percent in China, and 192 percent in the US.A Teva Pharmaceutical hydrocodone painkiller deters people who might try to crush, snort, or inject the drug to get high, but it remains unclear whether the pill would be better at preventing oral abuse, Bloomberg News tells us. A US Food and Drug Administration panel meets Tuesday to decide whether to recommend the drug, called Vantrela ER, and a Pfizer pill will be reviewed by the same panel on Wednesday.advertisement The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund reached deals with several companies to research and develop drugs for neglected diseases. The fund is a public-private partnership between the Japanese government, several drug makers, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, and the United Nations Development program. The latest partners include Otsuka Pharmaceutical, GlaxoSmithKline, Johnson & Johnson, Merck, and Fujifilm.Federal prosecutors added new charges accusing Martin Shkreli of conspiracy for allegedly using employees and consultants to conceal his control of stock in Retrophine, a drug company he once ran, Bloomberg News reports. Last December, Shkreli was arrested for securities fraud charges in which prosecutors claimed he backdated documents, hid records, and ran the drug maker and a hedge fund like a Ponzi scheme.The pace of job-hopping among biotech execs in the Boston area is accelerating, due to scientific breakthroughs, venture capitalists bankrolling startups, and Big Pharma setting up shop, the Boston Globe says.A Mylan Pharmaceuticals biosimilar was equivalent to Roche’s Herceptin breast cancer treatment in a study of 500 patients, the Wall Street Journal writes.The FDA reported that “a large number of patients” have suffered severe burns and scars after using a migraine headache patch sold by Teva Pharmaceuticals.A Maryland appeals court ruled that Pfizer is not liable as an “apparent manufacturer” of Insulag, an asbestos-containing cement made by a company it acquired, Bloomberg News says. Good morning, everyone, and welcome to another working week. We hope the weekend was relaxing and invigorating because the usual routine has returned. And the usual frenetic pace is heightened thanks to a medical meeting for cancer researchers and a biotech conference. So time to swill a cup of stimulation and dig in. Here are some tidbits. Hope your day goes well and do keep in touch …The annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology — a sort of Woodstock for cancer researchers — is underway, and various clinical trial results are being reported. So here are dispatches concerning treatments being developed by Roche, Bristol-Myers Squibb, AbbVie and Johnson & Johnson, plus a study on aromatase inhibitors and a discussion of the promise in combining immune agonists with checkpoint inhibitors.The expanded use of combination treatments for such maladies as multiple myeloma poses a dilemma for insurers and patients due to higher prices, the Wall Street Journal writes. Adding Johnson & Johnson’s Darzalex to an older combination of two medicines proved effective in a trial, but the total cost — based on list prices and dosing in the study — would be at least $180,000 a year.advertisementcenter_img Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Alex Hogan/STAT By Ed Silverman June 6, 2016 Reprints PharmalotPharmalot, Pharmalittle: Rising prices for combo cancer drugs pose a dilemma Ed Silvermanlast_img read more

Don’t rewrite history: ‘Sunshine’ law was meant to protect docs from undue influence

first_imgFirst OpinionDon’t rewrite history: ‘Sunshine’ law was meant to protect docs from undue influence Drug firms would not have to disclose certain payments to doctors under proposed legislation from Senator John Barrasso, above. J. Scott Applewhite/AP Please enter a valid email address. Privacy Policy Leave this field empty if you’re human: Nothing in the Physician Payments Sunshine Act prohibits companies from funding researchers, medical education, or scientific research. It simply requires them to drag this money out of the shadows and report it publicly.I am proud of what my colleagues and I accomplished in writing and passing the Sunshine Act. It gives doctors better tools to evaluate the quality of information they get in continuing medical education courses or in journal articles sent to them by sales representatives, and so can help them better serve their patients. But it was a small, conservative step forward. And that’s the direction we need to keep moving. Not backwards.Paul D. Thacker, a former investigator on the United States Senate Finance Committee, is a writer living in Spain. Even before writing the Sunshine Act, my colleagues on the Senate Finance Committee released a report about industry’s undue influence on continuing medical education. These are the hours of training doctors need each year to maintain expertise. The report showed that drug and device companies routinely funded continuing medical education as part of their marketing strategies, spending $1 billion on the practice in 2004, and that this system guided doctors toward more expensive and less-tested products. Related: Tags continuing medical educationdrug marketingSunshine Act About the Author Reprints Medical groups push to water down requirements for disclosing industry ties @thackerpd Volumes of evidence led us to conclude that corporate funding was transforming continuing medical education and science publishing into marketing and public relations vehicles. Although Senate staffers were heavily lobbied to exclude these materials from the Sunshine Act because they were purportedly independent sources of information, we rejected those arguments because they had little merit.Senate investigations of medicine that brought scandals to light have often been met by special interest claims that these were “past practices” by “bad apples.” Yet these bad habits continue. Last year, the Journal of Medical Ethics published a study examining 14 accredited continuing medical education courses that had been designed to teach doctors about low sexual desire in women. In reality, these courses were littered with marketing messages to promote Addyi, a new drug for hypoactive sexual desire in women, or what the study authors called “a condition that was sponsored by industry to prepare the market for a specific treatment.” The journal followed up with a commentary castigating the medical education industry for replacing education with commercial marketing.Journals themselves don’t always guard against such deceptive practices. In dozens of instances where industry was found to ghostwrite or secretly fund studies, journals have done little to correct the record, sometimes ignoring a mountain of evidence. Take this case in which investigators combed through documents made public in lawsuits and found that a high-profile medical journal article published to promote an antidepressant drug contained gross misrepresentations of data and clear evidence that the study was ghostwritten by a public relations firm. The journal that published the study did nothing to acknowledge this.In an effort to explain the lack of incentives to address ethical problems by scientific publishers, Richard Smith, a former editor of The BMJ, wrote, “What is clear is that it will continue to be easy to publish weak science, but hard to publish well-argued and supported accusations of fraud and misconduct.” Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. Pharma should not be allowed a loophole for reporting financial ties to docs Paul D. Thacker Related: More than 100 state and national medical societies are trying to water down the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, a law that protects doctors and their patients from undue influence by pharmaceutical and medical device companies. They’re welcome to do that. But they can’t rewrite history in the process.Senator John Barrasso (R-Wyo.) recently introduced the Protect Continuing Physician Education and Patient Care Act. It would roll back the Sunshine Act requirement that drug and device companies report payments they’ve made to fund continuing medical education for doctors or to send them copies of research studies. The various medical societies support the new bill, arguing that it wasn’t the “intent” of Congress to exclude doctors from receiving “independent” and “high quality” scientific information.As the person who wrote the first draft of the Sunshine Act, and then worked for years to get it passed, I’d like to notify American doctors: “Your professional societies are misleading you.” In fact, our concern about corporate bias and poor quality in medical education and scientific publishing was one thing that led us to promote the bill in the first place.advertisement [email protected] By Paul D. Thacker Aug. 10, 2016 Reprints The top Republican at the hearing, Senator Mel Martinez (R-Fla.) agreed. “Sometimes the line between promotion and education can be blurred. This is the reason … transparency and appropriate common sense safeguards are absolutely necessary,” he noted.The influence of pharmaceutical and device companies in scientific publishing is equally alarming. Take ghostwriting in medical literature. This happens when drug and device companies hire public relations firms to write scientific studies which are then “authored” by researchers who sometimes make only minor changes before the articles are published in science journals. I was part of the Senate Finance Committee investigative team that reported that ghostwriting is quite common and journals can do little to stop it. When the Senate Aging Committee held a hearing on continuing medical education in 2009, Senator Herb Kohl (D-Wis.), the committee chair, was blunt in his remarks. “Large corporations do not typically spend these sums unless they think they will get something out of it,” he said. As cosponsor of the Sunshine Act, he recommended greater financial transparency.advertisementlast_img read more

Q&A: Figuring out how songbirds sing may lead to better understanding of how humans learn

first_img Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Q&A: Figuring out how songbirds sing may lead to better understanding of how humans learn What is it? Scientists have long suspected songbirds might hold the secrets to better understanding how human learn to talk. Now several Florida-based researchers believe understanding how some birds sing could someday lead to answers about some human developmental learning disabilities.A team of Florida State University scientists — led by psychologist Rick Hyson, statistician Wei Wu, biomathematician Richard Bertram, and neuroanatomist Frank Johnson — have received an $800,000 National Science Foundation grant to study the brains of male zebra finches and how they learn to sing. Florida State University scientists are studying how male zebra finches learn to sing. Mohammad Abdullah/Creative Commons Log In | Learn More GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. By Max Blau Aug. 14, 2017 Reprints Tags neuroscienceresearchSTAT+ Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. In the Lab What’s included?last_img read more

California bans drug coupons when cheaper alternatives are available

first_img Log In | Learn More Pharmalot Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Ed Silverman Tags drug pricespharmaceuticalsSTAT+ Call it a one-two punch.At the same time California Governor Jerry Brown signed a law, requiring drug makers explain and justify price hikes, he also signed another law prohibiting the use of prescription drug coupons when a lower-priced generic medicine is available. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What’s included? [email protected] What is it?center_img APStock @Pharmalot Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED By Ed Silverman Oct. 10, 2017 Reprints California bans drug coupons when cheaper alternatives are available About the Author Reprints GET STARTEDlast_img read more

Pharmalittle: Takeda finally makes a deal for Shire; Congress probes insulin pricing today

first_img What’s included? Pharmalot By Ed Silverman May 8, 2018 Reprints Alex Hogan/STAT Log In | Learn More Hello, everyone, and how are you today? We are doing just fine, thank you, especially since a warm and shiny sun is enveloping the Pharmalot campus. Our short person has left for the local schoolhouse and our official mascots are ensconced in their corners, snoozing away. We, however, have no time for napping. A busy day awaits and, no doubt, you can relate. So grab a cup of stimulation — or a water bottle, if you prefer — and let us all get cracking. Here are some items of interest to help you along. Hope you conquer the world today and, as always, keep in touch …Takeda Pharmaceutical (TKPYY) agreed to pay $62 billion to buy Shire (SHPG) following a months-long battle that will create the world’s eighth-largest drug-maker with combined sales of $30 billion. The move extends Takeda’s reach in key U.S. and European markets, although the company will borrow cash to fund the deal, worrying some shareholders. The deal means Takeda will now earn roughly half of its revenue in the U.S. — where companies have greater flexibility to charge what they like — up from one-third of its revenue previously, The Wall Street Journal says. About 7 percent of 52,000 workers will lose jobs. [email protected] About the Author Reprints What is it? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.center_img @Pharmalot GET STARTED Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Ed Silverman Pharmalittle: Takeda finally makes a deal for Shire; Congress probes insulin pricing today Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Tags Donald Trumpdrug pricingfinanceMedicareopioidspharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

Months after a monstrous blowup, a closely watched biotech sets its sights on gene therapy

first_img Months after a monstrous blowup, a closely watched biotech sets its sights on gene therapy GET STARTED By Damian Garde June 6, 2018 Reprints Axovant founder Vivek Ramaswamy Chantal Heijnen for STAT @damiangarde What is it? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Log In | Learn More Biotech What’s included?center_img Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the biotech sector — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Tags biotechnology [email protected] If you bet $100 on Axovant Sciences nine months ago, you’re down 93 bucks. But the biotech company best known for a blowup rivaling bitcoin wants a second chance, and on Wednesday is unveiling new management and a new drug it believes can win investors back over.Axovant, founded by biotech entrepreneur Vivek Ramaswamy, is pivoting to gene therapy. The company paid $30 million up front for a one-time treatment Axovant believes could change the lives of patients with Parkinson’s disease. National Biotech Reporter Damian covers biotech, is a co-writer of The Readout newsletter, and a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Damian Garde About the Author Reprintslast_img read more

Lessons Learned: One way to get into biopharma consulting? Start a club in grad school

first_img Lessons Learned: One way to get into biopharma consulting? Start a club in grad school What’s included? By Megha Satyanarayana Aug. 15, 2018 Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Molly Ferguson for STAT Lessons Learned is STAT Plus’ weekly column on careers in biomedicine. If you’re thinking of jumping from academics to industry/business or vice versa, join us each week for useful tips. And if you’ve recently jumped, send us a note: [email protected] Your experience might make a future column. Who we talked to: Lessons Learned Tags STAT+ Log In | Learn More Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. GET STARTED What is it?last_img read more