Young People Encouraged to Unleash Creative Energy

first_imgYoung People Encouraged to Unleash Creative Energy CultureJuly 2, 2011 Advertisements RelatedYoung People Encouraged to Unleash Creative Energy By GARFIELD L. ANGUS, JIS Reporter RelatedYoung People Encouraged to Unleash Creative Energy FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail MANDEVILLE — Chief Education Officer in the Ministry of Education, Grace McLean, is encouraging young people to use their energy creatively, and make a difference in their community and the wider society. Delivering the keynote address at the graduation ceremony of Denbigh High School, in Clarendon, on June 29, Mrs. McLean said that adults need to help young people to use the knowledge and energy they possess, to impact themselves and the country in positive ways. “Let me encourage you to think of the positive ways in which you can utilise your energy. Do not harbour evil thoughts, but think of ways that you can make a difference. Even when life throws the hard blows at you, brush them off, pick up the pieces and start again. Those of us who seem to be doing well today, it has not been without its struggles; things have not come easy, but through determination we have pulled through. So, if we can do it, you can do it too, and even better,” she told the graduates. She urged the parents to assist the young ones, and to share experiences with them. “Let us not think that they do not need our guidance anymore, but let us continue to counsel and coach them, so they can take their rightful place in the society. There are numerous opportunities available in the country today, and as adults we have a responsibility to point these young people towards these various opportunities,” she said. Mrs. McLean challenged the graduates to work hard at pursuing their dreams, and to read every day. Valedictorian, Alecia Watson, who won five awards, including top Mathematics student, said they are all achievers. “The accomplishment of your goals and dreams are only possible through dedication, passion and effort. Don’t ever become easily discouraged; believe in yourself and your dreams. Stay determined in the face of adversities, and never let fear hold you back,” she told her fellow students. Meanwhile, graduate of the year, Michael Lewis, who also copped five awards,  told JIS News that  working hard at school had paid off. “When I was growing up in Sunday school, I heard the story about the man getting one talent and burying it, so I decided not to bury any of my talents. I have received many talents from God, not one, not two, but many. If you have talent, whether it be one or two, don’t bury it,” he emphasised. RelatedYoung People Encouraged to Unleash Creative Energylast_img read more

Manhattan office leasing just had its worst quarter since 2013

first_imgAmid the slowdown, the Downtown market continued to increase its share of overall leasing activity, accounting for nearly a quarter of it.“The Manhattan office market is not at all homogenous. As the first quarter ended, there were clearly pockets — such as Lower Manhattan — that outperformed the rest,” said Franklin Wallach, Colliers’ senior managing director for New York research. “Overall leasing volume decreased across Manhattan and we will continue to monitor the impact of Covid-19 on the market as we enter the second quarter.”The Midtown submarket saw 2.96 million square feet in leasing activity in the quarter, down 31 percent year-over-year. The largest deal was financial services firm Cantor Fitzgerald’s 152,000-square-foot renewal at Jack Resnick & Sons and the Ruben Companies’ 110 East 59th Street.Midtown South, including Hudson Yards and the Penn District, saw 2.16 million square feet in deals in the quarter, including the two largest: law firm Debevoise & Plimpton’s 531,000-square-foot lease at Tishman Speyer’s Spiral, and Apple’s 220,000-square foot lease at Vornado’s 11 Penn Plaza. Both tenants had been pushed out of their initial targets by Facebook, at 50 Hudson Yards and the Farley Building, respectively.Downtown’s leasing volume totalled 1.69 million square feet, down 34 percent year-over-year. Unlike the other submarkets, where FIRE tenants — finance, insurance and real estate — led the way, TAMI tenants — technology, advertising, media and information — were the most active sector in this submarket, accounting for 36 percent of volume.The largest deal went to fashion retailer L Brands, the parent company of Victoria’s Secret, which inked a 220,000-square foot lease at the Retirement Systems of Alabama’s 55 Water Street.The slow quarter also saw the overall availability rate in Manhattan rise slightly to 10.2 percent. Undeterred by the slowdown, the average asking rent rose slightly, to $79.47 a foot.The second quarter figures to be far more challenging than the first, but some in real estate are taking the long view.“The New York City office market has been tested numerous times over hundreds of years through wars, diseases, natural disasters, recessions and terrorist attacks,” said Wallach. “Each time, the New York City market comes back stronger.” This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Now Park Avenue pictured on March 30, 2020 (Credit: John Nacion/NurPhoto via Getty Images)On the heels of its busiest year in nearly two decades, office leasing in Manhattan ended the first quarter of 2020 on a low note, with the coronavirus pandemic putting a damper on all types of economic activity.Leasing volume for the quarter totaled 6.82 million square feet, the fewest since the third quarter of 2013, according to a new report from Colliers International. More than half of that total came from January, which saw 3.56 million square feet in leases in inked. Deal volume fell in February to 2.1 million square feet and again in March to 1.16 million. The quarter’s total was also 26 percent below the five-year average.Read moreManhattan office leasing just had its most active year since 2001Debevoise signs big lease at Tishman Speyer’s SpiralApple is in talks for a lease at Vornado’s 11 Penn Plazalast_img read more

Traditional names

first_img Posted August 28, 2006 I apologize for quibbling, but how is Lightning a local name? Isn’t there lightning everywhere in the U.S. and southern Canada? Tampa Bay has something like the second largest number of lightening strikes per year in the world. 0 Link to post Share this post Traditional names Go To Topic Listing 0 Traditional names 0 Link to post SabreGuy Posted August 29, 2006 Location:Belleville, ON, CA Location:Long Island, NY 72 DJSpeedy roadatlanta4 0 0 Share on other sites Posted August 29, 2006 Edited August 28, 2006 by fonz Share on other sites Location:Winston-Salem, NC 25 Members 199 posts 0 Banned 741 posts Link to post fonz 0 edensker Page 1 of 3   Link to post This topic is now closed to further replies. Location:Belleville, ON, CA Its seems like everytime we hear of a new franchise/team coming into a league the name is some crazy animal or thing that is trying to be fierce or intimidating when all it is a flashy logo…..most of the time stupid and ridiculous(cough ABA cough).Look at the NFL the expansions since 1995PanthersJaguarsRavensTitansTexans….actually not bad so this can be a slight exceptionMLB isnt too bad….well besides these first 2 Diamond BacksDevil RaysRockiesNationalsMarlinsThe NBA is ridiculousBobcatsRaptorsMagicGrizzliesTimberwolvesOf course we cant for get the NHLMighty DucksHurricanesWildThrashersPredatersLightningAvalancheCoyotes….and most of these teams ruined great teams like the Jets and the Nordiques Link to post Share this post Edited August 29, 2006 by OMMF It’s a bowling term I’ve applied to throat rips edensker Posted August 29, 2006 Forums Home 0 0 0 Followers 2 Share this post BBM Aside from the fact that most of the nicknames you called out are actually pretty great in my opinion (Thrashers, Timberwolves, Ravens, etc), think about the team names that have been around for 50-100 years. I mean, imagine if a team started up right now and called themselves the Angels. How many jokes would come of that? Red and White Sox? Knickerbockers? Those names are all classic and nobody ever really stops to think about how ridiculous they sound nowadays. And you’re complaining about large animals and warriors?That being said, all singular names suck and should be outlawed. Share this post random_ax New_Member fonz 0 Share this post random_ax SabreGuy Link to post 0 SabreGuy Posted August 28, 2006 Sports Logo News Share this post DJSpeedy 0 0 Posted August 29, 2006 Share this post Share on other sites 0 0 Link to post 512 posts Members Sign in to follow this   Piping Free 0 Share this post It’s a bowling term I’ve applied to throat rips Islesfan 0 Share this post 0 466 posts Its seems like everytime we hear of a new franchise/team coming into a league the name is some crazy animal or thing that is trying to be fierce or intimidating when all it is a flashy logo…..most of the time stupid and ridiculous(cough ABA cough).Look at the NFL the expansions since 1995PanthersJaguarsRavensTitansTexans….actually not bad so this can be a slight exceptionMLB isnt too bad….well besides these first 2 Diamond BacksDevil RaysRockiesNationalsMarlinsThe NBA is ridiculousBobcatsRaptorsMagicGrizzliesTimberwolvesOf course we cant for get the NHLMighty DucksHurricanesWildThrashersPredatersLightningAvalancheCoyotes….and most of these teams ruined great teams like the Jets and the Nordiques Neither Titans nor Texans are “new” to the NFL.Both names were associated with AFL, NFL, and Arena league teams.And the Nationals name goes way back also – probably before your lifetime. The Ravens name was voted on by the fans of Baltimore as a tribute to Edgar Allan Poe, a Baltimore native. Share this post 8 7,537 posts That being said, all singular names suck and should be outlawed. I agree…listgen to these…Bobby Hull was a JetYzerman was a Red WingIginla is a FlameKariya is a PredatorThese sound good. The following…do not.Gaborik is a Wild (What???)Mr. X is a Magic (Can’t think of anyone on the team)Malone was a Jazz (makes NO sense!)All teams must be pluralized.-out Share on other sites Of course we cant for get the NHLMighty DucksHurricanesWildThrashersPredatersLightningAvalancheCoyotes….and most of these teams ruined great teams like the Jets and the Nordiques If by “most” you mean 3 of 9, then you are correct. 0 Members 0 Sports Logos Share this post youcan’tseeme Posted August 28, 2006 yah there are a lot of animal names but what else are you gonn name teams after? you can’t really do plants except for Maple Leafs, people the only thing worse then animasl in my opinion is names like speed, destruction, rebels rage, names named after emotion are a lot worse then animals. We need more names that honou stuff like the city or military (ie Maple Leafs, Red Wings, Blue Jackets and Patriots) Members youcan’tseeme Members Share on other sites Posted August 28, 2006 Members Posted August 28, 2006 Share on other sites 2 Members 2 0 Members Sports Logos edensker Location:Dallas, Texas Location:Dallas, Texas 199 posts 0 2 25 Its seems like everytime we hear of a new franchise/team coming into a league the name is some crazy animal or thing that is trying to be fierce or intimidating when all it is a flashy logo…..most of the time stupid and ridiculous(cough ABA cough).Look at the NFL the expansions since 1995PanthersJaguarsRavensTitansTexans….actually not bad so this can be a slight exceptionMLB isnt too bad….well besides these first 2 Diamond BacksDevil RaysRockiesNationalsMarlinsThe NBA is ridiculousBobcatsRaptorsMagicGrizzliesTimberwolvesOf course we cant for get the NHLMighty DucksHurricanesWildThrashersPredatersLightningAvalancheCoyotes….and most of these teams ruined great teams like the Jets and the NordiquesThe team names you mentioned are almost all fine and in some cases great, with the exception of some of the collective noun names and some abstract concepts.I’m not even sure what qualifies as a “crazy” animal unless the Las Vegas Mutated Lab Rats or New Jesery Rapid Dogs enter a league soon.The NFL names you mentioned are all fine, being either local animals, tied to the city’s history or alliterative. In fact, even though it is a fine name, I feel the Texans is the worst of them, considering that there is already a team in Texas. I mean Dallas fans have to feel a little wierd saying stuff like “Texans suck”, its a bit unfair.Older teams like the Chargers, Lions, Redskins, Dolphins and Seahawks all have good names, but could be castigated as abstract, uninspired, racist, wussy, and “crazy”, they surely would have made your list if they were recent expansion teams. As for baseball, I think the Diamondbacks is a great name; its local, unique, and – maybe this is a stretch here – is cool because it is a baseball team with the word diamond in it. I agree with you that Devil Rays is bad.The Timberwolves, Grizzlies (especially considering their Vancouver heritage), and Bobcats are all fine names. The Magic and Raptors are horrendous though.I have to say, the NHL has really come short with many of their new teams. But still the Hurricanes, Lightning and Avalanche (exceptions to the collective noun rule), and Coyotes are all local names that are good.Lastly, there are many bad team names that have been around for a while- such as the Astros (lame, despite its local relevance) and as Lucky mentioned the Angels.The problem is with so many teams already in existence, it is hard to come up with a good original name. Colleges have often taken the best local names and the generic ones (which are usually kind of lame) are running out. Many established teams get a pass on weak names anyway, because they have been around for a long time. The Giants, Jets, Lions, Cardinals, Hawks, Falcons, Athletics, Nationals are all vanilla. They just happen to have been around for so long, they became classic. The best team names are original and local: Vikings, Pistons, Yankees, 49ers, Buccaneers, Steelers, Celtics, Seahawks etc. When this happens, collective nouns names even get a passing grade: Jazz (only when they were in New Orleans, of course), Avalanche, Heat. 3 22 888 Link to post 0 0 yeah, but Wind, Wildcats and Fury work anywhere, so if the owners decide to pull up stakes every couple of years and move the team somewhere else… they can keep using the same letterhead! lol Ha ha, good one. And by the way, you have the funniest avatar that I have ever seen. I can’t stop laughing every time I see it. 0 72 Link to post 1,489 posts 0 72 Link to post Share on other sites JohnnyFriedRice Link to post Posted August 28, 2006 34 posts Recommended Posts 0 1 Posted August 28, 2006 I would contend that the history of the team that is associated with the name matters more than the name itself. Think about one of the most historic/retrocool names out there–the Green Bay Packers. They were named after the Indian Packing Company, and have been called the Indian Packers or the Acme Packers depending on their sponsorship at the time. Yet I would wager this name fits in the “good” category of names at the beginning of this thread because a) it’s been in use for 85+ years, and because the Packers have historically been one of the more successful NFL teams.Imagine if a team right now was nicknamed after a corporation. Everyone would have a field day with it. But any of these names, no matter how crappy they seem now, might seem steeped in tradition to our grandkids. What if, in 2084, the Atlanta Thrashers have won 12 championships, or the Jacksonville Jaguars have 26 Pro Football Hall of Famers. Fans might then think that these are some of the most revered names in their sports. Like so many other things, it’s impossible to judge a name without the benefit of historical perspective. Members Link to post Share on other sites 69 posts OMMF whitedawg22 We need more names that honou stuff like the city or military (ie Maple Leafs, Red Wings, Blue Jackets and Patriots) I agree wholeheartedly. Those that you mentioned are great, as are Dodgers (at least the name made sense when the team was in Brooklyn), Texas Rangers, Pistons, Brewers and many others. Teams just need to put a little thought into the process, instead of narrowing their lists down to insipid choices. “Ok fans, choose between Wind, Wildcats or Fury.” Islesfan Share this postcenter_img Page 1 of 3   Share on other sites 4,910 posts Posted August 28, 2006 72 2 Members 0 Posted August 28, 2006 All Activity 0 Share on other sites 0 Location:Alliston, Ontario Posted August 28, 2006 Its seems like everytime we hear of a new franchise/team coming into a league the name is some crazy animal or thing that is trying to be fierce or intimidating when all it is a flashy logo…..most of the time stupid and ridiculous(cough ABA cough).Look at the NFL the expansions since 1995PanthersJaguarsRavensTitansTexans….actually not bad so this can be a slight exceptionMLB isnt too bad….well besides these first 2 Diamond BacksDevil RaysRockiesNationalsMarlinsThe NBA is ridiculousBobcatsRaptorsMagicGrizzliesTimberwolvesOf course we cant for get the NHLMighty DucksHurricanesWildThrashersPredatersLightningAvalancheCoyotes….and most of these teams ruined great teams like the Jets and the Nordiques Neither Titans nor Texans are “new” to the NFL.Both names were associated with AFL, NFL, and Arena league teams.And the Nationals name goes way back also – probably before your lifetime. The Ravens name was voted on by the fans of Baltimore as a tribute to Edgar Allan Poe, a Baltimore native. As far as the beasts you named….I like the helmets/names for every one of the teams.PanthersJaguarsRavensDiamond BacksDevil Rays (Too bad they caved to pressure to drop the Devil…that IS the name of the fish)MarlinsBobcatsRaptors (though I’m glad about a rumor that they are replacing the “Barney” logo with a one less cartoony)GrizzliesTimberwolves (great name…too good for the NBA, should have been NHL or NFL,sorry)Mighty Ducks (they 86’ed the Mighty and improved the logo)Wild (well, this one sucks but I’m not a fan of singular names)ThrashersPredatorsCoyotes. (haven’t liked either logo) (edited) 0 SportsLogos.Net Posted August 28, 2006 Share on other sites 888 Posted August 28, 2006 Link to post 0 0 Next 0 0 Members Members 0 741 posts Forums Home yeah, but Wind, Wildcats and Fury work anywhere, so if the owners decide to pull up stakes every couple of years and move the team somewhere else… they can keep using the same letterhead! lol Share on other sites 72 3 Share this post Share on other sites Share on other sites 0 edensker Posted August 29, 2006 BBM 0 199 posts 0 72 25 0 0 Next SportsLogos.Net 0 edensker Share on other sites CCSLC Night Crew leader? Share on other sites Link to post Share this post 8 2,008 posts Followers 2 yeah, but Wind, Wildcats and Fury work anywhere, so if the owners decide to pull up stakes every couple of years and move the team somewhere else… they can keep using the same letterhead!  lol Ha ha, good one. And by the way, you have the funniest avatar that I have ever seen. I can’t stop laughing every time I see it. yah i have to agree that’s one dam funny avatar 22 321 posts Location:Dallas, Texas Share on other sites New_Member 0 roadatlanta4 whitedawg22 Posted August 28, 2006 0 Link to post 120 Members SabreGuy (edited) 0 Link to post edensker Link to post 0 372 posts Members 0 8 lucky 0 I apologize for quibbling, but how is Lightning a local name? Isn’t there lightning everywhere in the U.S. and southern Canada? 2 Members Share on other sites Location:Dallas, Texas Location:Portage la Prairie, MB 0 SabreGuy By roadatlanta4, August 28, 2006 in Sports Logo News Link to post 293 posts 0 Members Location:Alliston, Ontario 0 SabreGuy Location:Latitude 47° Link to post Share on other sites I’d like to see you call a panther to its face that it is crazy. It’ll probably tear your face off and eat your human meat. 888 Link to post Posted August 29, 2006 Share on other sites Share this post Share this post Location:Michigan JohnnyFriedRice lucky 0 0 741 posts Share this post Members 0 Prev Share this post edensker There is too much focus on animals, I will agree with you there. Share this post Posted August 29, 2006 All Activity youcan’tseeme edensker youcan’tseeme Location:Belleville, ON, CA 0 120 Prev That being said, all singular names suck and should be outlawed. I agree…listgen to these…Bobby Hull was a JetYzerman was a Red WingIginla is a FlameKariya is a PredatorThese sound good. The following…do not.Gaborik is a Wild (What???)Mr. X is a Magic (Can’t think of anyone on the team)Malone was a Jazz (makes NO sense!)All teams must be pluralized.-out Wildman, Magician and Jazzman? OMMF 199 posts Location:Bremen, Ohio USA Sign in to follow this   4,910 posts 22 Members Members Share this post 1,857 posts 120 I actually like all these names. They are unique and are only associated with the team they represent. No confusion. Sports Logo News 1 I like the Ravens name a lot. It is different, but not stupid, and it has a tie to the Baltimore area.Titans is another good one, though it is odd seeing it used by a team located in Tennessee.The NBA and NHL names listed are generally abysmal for reasons that are too lengthy to list . Traditional nameslast_img read more

8 Free Links to Promote a Blog

first_imgDo you have a new blog? Want to get 8 free links to your blog? Here is a list of free links in blog directories that you can get for your blog, along with the Page Rank of the blog directory (read this article to learn more about Page Rank: The Importance of Google PageRank: A Guide For Small Business Executives).So far, none of these links have driven a ton of traffic, however, more inbound links do help you a lot in terms of search engine optimization (read this article to learn more about linkbuilding: Executive Summary: Linkbuilding and SEO for the Internet Marketing Neophyte).We have submitted our own blog to each of these blog directories and can confirm that they are quality links from reputable sources, and they are all free and do not require a reciprocal link.8 Quality Blog Directories with Free, No-Reciprocal Links Page Rank  PR: wait… I: wait… L: wait… LD: wait… I: wait…wait… C: wait… SD: wait… Blog Optimization 3 Globe of Blogs 6 5 Bloggernity Did you like what you read? Want more? Get automatic updates by subscribing to our RSS Feed or Email List (top right hand side of this page). SuperBlog Directory 3 7 BlogFlux 6 Blog Listing Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Bloggapedia Blog Directory Blogarama Topics: Originally published Nov 28, 2007 12:18:00 PM, updated October 18 2015 4 6 Bloggiolast_img read more

Happy National Candy Cane Day, Marketers!

first_img inbound marketing kit special day Your Marketing Takeaways: 2.  Decorating the tree with candy canes became fashionable during the 1850s when a resident of Ohio,  August Imgard, hung them on a Christmas tree to augment his homemade decorations. What type of “sweet” data points can you find in your business? 4. The modern candy cane was invented by Bob McCormack of Atlanta.  He started the curved candy trend sometime in the early 1920’s with handmade versions.  As the original candy cane maker in the United States, Bob’s Candies manufactured about two million each day in 2009. ,  ,  . Inbound Marketing Kit 1. The original candy cane did not have stripes.  Before the red stripe was introduced, a candy cane was simply a white, mint-flavored stick. 3. Some Christians believe the candy cane has a symbolic meaning with the “J” shape representing Jesus’s initial, and the red/white stripes representing Christ’s purity and blood.  Others view the candy as the shape of a shepherd’s hook.  , and a  6. Candy canes are made with sugar, corn syrup, and starch – a super-solid sugar rush.   Learn more about inbound marketing and how to combine blogging, SEO and social media for results. Download our 7. Candy canes were once considered “medicine”.  The soothing peppermint and sugar combo was used as a pacifier for children. Other flavors – including anise and cinnamon – were used by apothecaries to help soothe and calm their patients (probably the parents of the kids that needed a pacifier).center_img Two billion candy canes, about $214 million worth, were purchased this holiday season by consumers with a sweet tooth.   tweets . YouTube videos Facebook application history Here are some fun facts to help you celebrate the sugary day of December 26.  And, if on this day after Christmas, you are looking for ways to creatively use your leftover candy canes, here’s a video to give you some helpful tips.   Finally, once you have utilized this information for your own marketing efforts, the content will be picked up over and over again by others in your industry, creating the thought leadership every CEO looks for!   Every product has something interesting to say about it. Even an innocuous product like candy canes has its own  Originally published Dec 26, 2009 9:19:00 AM, updated March 21 2013 Using metrics or specific data points such as number sold, revenue generated, introduction of, or timeline/history, any company can create content that will resonate with its customers and prospects. You would be amazed at the number of statistics you can pull together once different angles are considered.  And, some of them can be fun! 5. The mass-produced version of the candy cane made the scene in the 1950s when Bob’s (see #3 above) brother-in-law figured out how to cut, pull, twist and package the confection in a factory setting.    , Twitter  Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Time to Drop Your Outdated Addiction to PPC [Cartoon]

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack What did you expect, pay-per-clue? PPC Originally published Jan 16, 2012 11:00:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Topics:last_img read more

15 Sure-Fire Ways to Guarantee Your Next Event Is SOLD OUT

first_img Topics: Originally published Aug 13, 2012 4:30:00 PM, updated June 25 2019 Ticket Sales Tip #1: Get Amy Schumer to perform at your event.Just kidding.But you may have heard that we just got done planning and hosting the biggest inbound marketing event ever (at which Amy Schumer did indeed perform) — INBOUND. And part of that planning meant, obviously, driving ticket sales.But how do you make your event stand out in the crowd? Not only that, how do you get people to actually spend the money to attend your event?We’re going to share some of our secrets with you that have helped drive our ticket sales for INBOUND past and present; hopefully these will help you promote your next event, too!Download free resources for executing your best event yet. [Free Kit]15 Ways to Drive Ticket Sales for Your Event1) Reward last year’s attendees.If you have an annual event, the first thing you should do is announce the event to last year’s attendees. The people who came the year before may be your biggest supporters and are more likely to immediately purchase the tickets, even if you don’t have all the details for the conference hammered out quite yet. Show that you appreciate them by offering them a special discount for signing up early and quickly.2) Offer early bird pricing.Have at least 2 different types of pricing: early bird and regular. You can even have more than one type of early bird pricing to encourage people to buy before the prices increase. This sense of urgency will encourage people to buy sooner.3) Ask early registrants to write blog posts.The people who register for your event first will be among your biggest supporters — that means they’re also good candidates to write blog posts for you to help promote the conference. To promote INBOUND 2012, we had the first person to register for this year’s conference write a blog post. We also had another customer who enjoyed last year’s conference write a blog post. Instead of hearing from the HubSpot team why we thought our conference was great, these posts let you hear when the event was a can’t-miss opportunity from actual attendees. Third-party endorsements will always carry more weight then tooting your own horn.4) Don’t just promote your conference; promote the location!People interested in your conference don’t just want to hear about your conference, they want to hear about the location of the conference. Frankly, the location of conferences can sometimes be one of the biggest draw for potential attendees — it’s kind of hard to say no to an event in a cool, beautiful city. Promote other attractions near where your conference is help that may interest attendees. If you can get discounted rates to some of those attractions, that’s even more of an incentive for people to attend your conference!5) Get in touch with industry organizations to help promote.In every industry, there are professional organizations who would be more than happy to help you promote your event. Get in touch with them, tell them about your event, provide email copy, and make it easy for them to promote on your behalf. This will help get your event in front of thousands of more qualified people that you wouldn’t normally have access to.6) Use LinkedIn for promotions targeted to your industry.LinkedIn Company Pages, LinkedIn Events, and LinkedIn Groups are a great way to contact people in your industry who may be interested in your event. Take advantage of the ability to promote your event to thousands of relevant people in your industry, on a social network built for networking — you know, the reason people go to events.7) Start contests within your company.Don’t forget about the giant network you have right within your office’s four walls — your employees. Encourage them to promote your event to the leads and customers they talk to through some friendly competition. Incentivize ticket sales by offering prizes to whoever sells the most tickets (give everyone a unique discount code so you can track it!), or you could even reward a full team for working together to sell tickets.8) Consistently update social media accounts.Social media accounts should have weekly updates with information about your conference, including links to the event’s registration page. Give your network a compelling reason to attend your conference in those updates, and a link to registration page to close the deal.9) Advertise on social media.Leveraging your paid advertising options on social media is another way to target people in your industry. Use targeted ads to promote to your industry with links directly to the registration page. If you need help getting started, here is a guide for executing a Facebook ad campaign, and a guide for executing a LinkedIn ad campaign.10) Leverage event sponsors for promotion.Your sponsors will want to help you with promotion, because more attendees means more facetime with more people. But they’re busy. Really busy. So the easier you make event promotion on them, the more likely it is they’ll actually do it. Provide sponsors with templated email copy and discount codes so it’s easy as pie to promote to their lists.11) Sprinkle calls-to-action throughout your website.Your homepage should have a promotion to your conference. Your login page (if you have one) should have a promotion to your conference. Your blog should have banners promoting your conference. If you’re planning a huge event, most pages on your website should have links to your conference site, making it easy for anyone to find information about your event and register.12) Issue different types of passes.Some people may not be able to attend your whole event, whether they’re unavailable for the full duration, can’t be away from the office for so long, or can’t swing the hotel costs. Issuing different types of passes helps accomodate those people and drive more ticket sales. Consider passes like a student pass, a keynote pass, or a party pass.13) Promote the “fun stuff.”Anyone hear of Cyndi Lauper? Anyone? Announcing a headliner performer will drive a lot of ticket sales as well as get people excited for more than just the content you’ll have during your conference sessions. The main reason people attend conferences is for the beneifical content, sure, but promoting the parties and some of the nighttime activities definitely helps. I mean, who doesn’t like to party?14) Gamify the act of event promotion and ticket sales.Host contests or games with your network to promote your conference and drive ticket sales. During your webinars, for example, you could take advantage of the large audience to promote the conference by giving away free tickets to whoever tweeted the most with your webinar hashtag. Everyone loves a little friendly competition, and you’ll certainly love the free promotion of your event!15) Ask your speakers to write blog posts promoting their sessions.The success of an event all comes down to its content. Reach out to speakers and ask them to write guest blog posts that promote their sessions, and give a sneak preview of what they’ll be discussing. It’s a win-win — they get more attendees excited about their session, and you get free content (that your guest blogger will likely promote to their network) to drive ticket sales.What other ways can you think of to drive ticket sales for events? Event Marketing Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

25 Things You’ll Have to Explain to Your Kids About Marketing One Day

first_img16) And there was a time when younger demographics spent more time doing this … Than doing this …17) How marketers pretty much had to guess about which of their marketing tactics were working because marketing analytics didn’t exist. 2) That there was this thing called the Yellowbook, and that’s how people would search for local businesses.3) How there was no such thing as internet marketing … because there was no such thing as the internet.4) How there was no such thing as mobile marketing either, because people’s cell phones looked like this … 25) What outbound marketing was ;-)What else would you add to this list? Share your thoughts in the comments below! 23) And this was once an innovative new advertising platform …(This is called a “radio,” by the way.)24) How marketers used to have to bug their IT departments to make changes to their websites. Originally published Mar 11, 2013 9:00:00 AM, updated March 21 2013 14) And how the only way to buy things without going to a physical store was through one of these.15) How keyword stuffing, page sculpting, and buying inbound links were once considered SEO best practices. Topics: 10) How companies could spam the heck out of your inbox with no legal repercussions whatsoever.11) And how Facebook was originally just for Harvard University students, and it was ad-free.12) How it was once cool to have banner, skyscraper, and pop-up ads on your website (and there was a time when people didn’t automatically tune them out). 6) And people would get suckered into picking up cold calls from telemarketers because there was no caller ID or Do Not Call Registry.7) You couldn’t skip through TV commercials either.8) How most websites looked something like this … 5) In fact, the only way to connect to the internet was to dial in on your computer through a modem. 13) What this big thing was used for … 21) How strangers used to knock on your door during dinner to try to sell you things.22) How these were once the main way people consumed content … 20) And that it once wasn’t against the law to pay your customers to leave you positive online reviews. 18) And how this was the only social networking you could do …19) How the only thing marketers could automate was their out-of-office voicemail. You can’t deny it: Marketing changes a mile a minute. Just think about how different things were 10, even 5 years ago! So when we recently discovered BuzzFeed’s list of 25 things you’ll have to explain to your kids one day, we thought it was just begging us to create a marketing parody.So we did!Take a look at these 25 things you’ll probably have to tell your kids about marketing one day because they’re either dying as effective marketing tactics, they weren’t always around, or they’re already a thing of the past.25 Things You’ll Have to Explain to Your Kids About Marketing One Day1) What direct mail was. Marketing Advice And before that, this … 9) And buying or renting lists were acceptable ways of growing your email marketing database. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Why You Might Want to Be More Negative in Your Marketing

first_img Originally published Apr 3, 2013 2:00:00 PM, updated July 28 2017 Marketing Strategy Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Ever wake up on the wrong side of the bed?Of course you have. We all have.Ever wake up on the wrong side of the bed, and then have to be cheery? Like, interact in social media? Write an engaging blog post? Put together a lovable email marketing campaign?Ugh. Those are the times you wish you could shut out the world, or at least channel a little of your inner snark. Well, the good news is you can do that once in a while, and your marketing results may even thank you for it! Sometimes, it’s good to embrace the negative — whether it’s shutting out audiences, casting a villain, or even just a less than cheerful attitude. (Trust me — this will all make sense in a second.)So, here we go … if you ever wake up wanting to shut out the world, here’s how you can take it out (positively!) in your marketing.Free Download: Marketing Editorial Calendar Template8 Opportunities to Be More Negative in Your Marketing1) Create Negative, or Exclusionary PersonasLet’s start with something a little bit easier to swallow than just being a total grumpy pants — exclusionary personas. Exclusionary personas, sometimes also referred to as negative personas, are kind of like the opposite of buyer personas — they’re the personas of the people you do not want to target in your marketing.This is about more than just recognizing that not everyone in the world is a potential future customer — it’s about recognizing that your marketing attracts certain types of people who totally clog up your funnel, waste your sales team’s time, and will never become customers. Why won’t they ever become a customer? Could be a lot of things — they don’t have the budget, or they’re just fans of your content or social media presence. Or maybe they do become customers, but they cost you a ton of money; for instance, they could have a high acquisition cost, or a high propensity to churn.In this case, it behooves you to identify who these folks are so you can ensure you either 1) stop creating content that draws in the wrong people, or 2) let them keep reading and engaging with your content to help you spread your reach, but keep them from getting rotated to sales reps using methods like assigning them a low lead score.2) Leverage ExclusivityThis is the VIP, red-carpet tactic we all know and love (or love to hate). When you tell someone they can’t have something, or what they want is scarce, it often makes them want it more. You know, the whole “playing hard to get” thing we’ve all either been victim of or practiced ourselves at one point or another in our love lives. This just so happens to be a common sales tactic, but marketers can use it, too. Tell prospects they can have an offer … but only for a limited time. Or only for the first 10 that respond in social media. Heck, you don’t even always have to tell them what it is. The 11K Club, which I wrote about in more detail in this post about leveraging exclusivity in your marketing, launched a campaign where they asked people to sign up for something — but they couldn’t tell you what.I totally signed up.This tactic is particularly popular with savvy ecommerce shops, too — ModCloth, for instance, frequently sends me emails letting me know that an item I like is so popular, it’s almost out of stock. “Oh no! Everyone else is snagging it! I have to get it before I’m left out!”The moral of the story? Leave people out once in a while. If everyone gets something, it’s not as special. And when you go VIP, the ones who do get it feel uber-special. (There … we just turned a negative into a positive. See?)3) Craft Negative Titles and HeadlinesI don’t know what this says about human nature, but there’s an undeniable correlation between page views and negativity. Consider these titles that showed up while scanning CNN’s homepage today:What you get wrong about BBQWorst U.S. cities for allergiesIvy leagues accepting fewer studentsCould our favorite flavorings be damaging our DNA?Beware the parental overshareThese are about clicks. No question about it. We all know the news has gone the negative route for years, and they do it because it works.Now, you shouldn’t throw out some inflammatory headline just to get clicks — if you’re going to get negative with your titles, you have to back it up with some solid content that actually merits that bombastic title of yours. Here are a few examples that worked out extremely well for us:15 Things People Absolutely Hate About Your Website13 Hilarious Examples of Truly Awful Stock PhotographyYour Mom Hates This Blog PostDoes Google Hate Small Businesses?4) Create a Bond Over a Shared Negative ExperienceAlright, now we’re getting warmed up! So you’re throwing out some negative titles, but have you considered drawing that negativity into your content? When you draw on a negative situation in your content — particularly right in the beginning — it can actually help reader retention and engagement. Some marketers are afraid to stir up negative feelings in their reader, but it can actually create a shared experience and tap into a level of emotion that some may not expect to get while reading marketing content, particularly if you’re a B2B marketer.I mean, that’s why I started this post the way I did — getting up on the wrong side of the bed is an experience everyone I know can relate to. And sometimes, it’s easier to form a bond with someone over a shared negative experience than something warm and fuzzy.But be forewarned — once you have a bond with the reader based on a shared negative experience, it’s crucial to shift the mood to something more positive and solution-oriented. People like to know they’re not alone (misery loves company), but most don’t like to dwell on the negativity.5) Cast Some VillainsJust like we can all bond over a shared negative experience, so too can we bond over a common enemy. Casting a villain has been a common marketing tactic for years, and I’m not just talking about the Hamburglar. Villains can take more subtle forms, playing on common tropes — the dopey husband, the nagging girlfriend, the jerk boss. These take common experiences and personify them in order to elicit a feeling in the consumer, and help tell the story you’re trying to tell. For a great example of using multiple villains in your marketing, just check out Career Builder’s 2009 Super Bowl commercial, brought to my attention via Graeme Newell and 602 Communications.6) Stir Up Some ControversyThis one’s not for the faint of heart, but if you feel confident about your brand, your PR team, and your position on an issue, you can take a controversial stance on a popular topic. This does a few things for your marketing:Positions yourself as a thought leader (only if your thought was a good one — so try to make sure it is)Sends a ton of traffic your wayHelps you define your brandDrives natural PRElicits strong emotions, both positive and negativeThat last one is what I want you to pay the most attention to. When you take a staunch position on a polarizing issue, you will have people that despise you for it. You will also generate some seriously ardent supporters. If you’re going to play the controversy game, be prepared to deal with both, because while some results could be really exciting for your brand, some backlash will inevitably come with it.7) Use Data to Build a Case Around Why Something StinksLet’s start this off with an example, since we did this just this morning in our blog post, “Why the Blog Post Is the New Ad Unit.” The beginning of the post included this data point:While clickthrough rates (CTR) are not the only metric by which you can measure a banner ad’s performance, typical online banner ad units achieve a CTR of 0.10% according to MediaMind’s Global Benchmarks Report, and that figure is on a downward spiral due to banner blindness, among other things.You build a case around why one thing stinks (banner ads) … so you can show why something else is awesome (blog posts). This can be made even more compelling if you have two data points that demonstrate a stark contrast; the juxtaposition of positive and negative paints a pretty dramatic picture in readers’ minds, and the succinct data points make it easy to quickly demonstrate the bad versus the good.8) Make Fun of YourselfFinally, turn that negativity inward. A little self-deprecation can be fun for others, makes you seem more human, and actually might make you feel better about your slip-ups. After all, we all have them, and it’s important to learn how to make light of your mistakes. For example, this very feeling was the impetus for a blog post we wrote several months ago: our very own Marketing Hall of Shame. In it, we detailed some of our dumbest marketing mistakes. It was helpful not only in the “being-the-first-to-laugh-at-yourself” way, but because people can learn from these mistakes, and hopefully not have to repeat them.When Negativity BackfiresAll this being said, it’s important to always consider whether your negativity is going to backfire. Are you being an unadulterated jerkface? Is this negativity going to be lost on your audience? Does your buyer persona really hate this kind of stuff?For instance, something that almost always comes off as totally petty and unnecessarily negative is bickering with competitors. I mean, think about how annoying political ads are; you certainly don’t want to come off like that. I think one piece of advice from my childhood can sum up how you should approach bickering with competitors:”If you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all.”Yes, even if they started it.It’s also important to remember that any negativity you draw on needs to be tempered with some positivity. For instance, we learned this the hard way with a post we published a few months ago called, “101 Sure-Fire Ways to Make People Hate Your Marketing.” It was a snark fest, but it didn’t perform that well, and some readers thought it was just too much negativity. The lesson? If you’re going to get snarky, 101 doses of it may be too much. Furthermore, had the balance of the post been tipped more heavily toward positive things, like how to fix these 101 mistakes, the response may have been more positive.Finally, I think striving to be inspirational should always be an aspiration for marketers. There’s no question that marketers capable of inspiring people — take charity:water’s unbelievable case study videos, or even our own founder Dharmesh Shah’s deck on creating a company we love at HubSpot — see unbelievable success from their efforts. In fact, I think if you’re able to inspire people in your marketing, the effects last much longer, and are much stronger than any of these negative tactics.What do you think about getting a little negative in your marketing? Do you ever get a bit edgy, or do you keep it to more behind-the-scenes stuff, like exclusionary personas? Share your thought in the comments!last_img read more

Hate Cold Calls From Telemarketers? Here’s a Way to Fight Back

first_img Inbound Sales (Marketing) Last week our CEO Brian Halligan published a fantastic article about why cold calling is dead and why inbound sales is the future.Nobody likes getting cold calls from telemarketers, which is reason enough to drop that kind of tactic. But if that’s not enough — here’s another reason. One guy in England has found a way to fight back on cold callers and telemarketers by forcing them to pay money to call him, the BBC reportsLee Beaumont, of Leeds, set himself up with a personal line that costs money to call — the kind normally used by for-pay services like horoscopes, tech support, and, um, “adult entertainment content.” In the U.S. we call them 1-900 numbers.In Britain there are a variety of numbers like this. The one Beaumont bought begins 0871. He paid 10 pounds (a bit over $15) plus tax to set up the line. It costs 10 pence a minute to call him on this line; he gets 7 pence and the rest goes to the service provider.Beaumont set up the line in November 2011, and then every time he was asked online to provide a phone number, he gave them the 0871 number. Beaumont even gave the number to his bank, gas, and electric companies. When they asked why he had a premium number he told them he doesn’t like getting called at home, so they can either pay to call him or they can contact him via email.Beaumont says the tactic has worked. These days he gets 13 calls a month, down from 20 to 30 before he bought the premium number.Setting a TrapBut there’s a twist to the story. Because Beaumont makes money with the line, he’s started trying to lure marketers into using it.For example, he posted the number on Twitter, hoping that marketing companies would pick it up and start calling him on it.Ironically, Beaumont says he now looks forward to those annoying calls from people trying to sell solar panels. When telemarketers call him, he tries to keep them on the phone for as long as possible, to run up the bill.So far he has made about 300 pounds, or about $450, with the line. That’s not a lot over a two-year period, but it’s enough to give him some satisfaction.A Message to MarketersThe point to this isn’t so much that marketers need to worry about hordes of people rushing out to buy premium numbers.The point is that in every aspect of their lives consumers are finding ways to tune out interruptive messages that they don’t want. They use DVRs to skip commercials. They use ad blocking software to get rid of ads on websites.As Brian Halligan wrote last week: “It’s imperative that those of us in Sales and Marketing adapt our approach to reflect the needs of the modern buyer. Customers are now controlling the buying process and inbound selling is how modern salespeople can keep up.”To learn the five keys to inbound selling, read Brian’s entire blog post, and check out his SlideShare, too.Image credit: starmanseries Originally published Sep 10, 2013 4:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more