NEJC Faces: Connor Ehman, musician

first_imgBy Tommy SherkConnor Ehman, Rockhurst High grad and singer with the WingdingsWhat got you into music?Connor Ehman: I got grounded in the first month of high school… [My parents] took away all my electronics, so the only thing I had was a guitar that my friend left here. So I learned how to play the guitar.I really liked this band called “The Strokes.” I liked playing their songs, and it gave me something to do. I liked the physical stimulation of playing the guitar. I like the sounds, but it really relaxes me when I move my hands like that. It’s stress relief for me.I started writing songs within a month or two of learning how to play the guitar… I like telling stories. Telling real stories using my imagination. I like to take something real about myself and transform it into a metaphor. I always try to make sure the story is really accurate to the situation. I would never say “blah blah blah” happened if it didn’t happen.The first I remember performing was at the Rockhurst High School Battle of the Bands. I remember feeling like there wasn’t much I could do with music. I could really only play a few chords on the guitar. So it was very gimmicky. I wore a pair of silver tights and a blue sweater with a flower in my hair. I got everyone to take their clothes off and throw them on the stage. Another time I came out in a fat Batman costume while [a bandmember] played the Batman theme song. But now, I feel like that same part of my personality is still part of performing in the sense that the Wingdings, the group I play with now, it’s still goofy and silly. But there’s a lot more substance to the music. I feel more confident because I think the music has a more wholesome quality to it.Do you make music for yourself or for others?CE: I used to make it because it felt good, physically. But the more that I’ve studied music, I realize how much joy you can bring to people through music. There is nothing more enjoyable than knowing that you made someone else have a good experience from music.Music is pretty much my whole life now. Not to be cheesy, but besides when I’m lifeguarding, I pretty much spend all day either listening to music, playing music, or preparing myself so that I can practice again. We rehearse probably every other day, at least.I think the end goal is just to have a life where I can support myself playing music, and I don’t have to do anything else. That could be audio production, playing gigs, being a recording artist or studio musician. But the whole goal is just to be immersed in it, so you can get really great at it. That’s when you can be most effective.last_img read more

This new rule could reveal the huge gap between CEO pay and worker pay

first_imgThe Washington Post:Thousands of public U.S. companies are likely to soon be forced to share a number many would rather keep under wraps: how much more their chief executives make than their typical rank-and-file employees.The Securities and Exchange Commission  is expected to finalize on Wednesday a long-delayed rule forcing businesses to share their “pay ratio,” a simple bit of arithmetic that would cast an unprecedented spotlight on one of corporate America’s thorniest debates.Once the pay-ratio rule is in place, millions of workers will know exactly how their top boss’s payday compares with their own, revealing a potentially embarrassing disparity in corporate riches that many companies have long fought to keep hidden.…Companies already disclose the pay of their chief executives, although not how it compares with that of personnel. Most Americans still drastically underestimate how wide that wealth gulf has become. In a Perspectives on Psychological Science study last year, researchers found that Americans estimate the pay gap between executives and unskilled workers is about 30 to 1, when in reality it’s more than 300 to 1, a misunderstanding that Harvard Business School professor Michael Norton has said can make people less likely to fight the gap.Read the whole story: The Washington Postlast_img read more

Dogs Lifting Spirits Around Los Alamos: Meet Tyrone

first_imgAll bundled up against the early morning chill, 5-pound Yorkshire Terrier Tyrone, 11, likes to take this quiet time of the day to contemplate how he might best lift spirits around Los Alamos. Tyrone is a member of the C.A. Clark family. Courtesy photolast_img

Argos Place Second in Gold Division at Ann Rhoads Shootout

first_img Share Argos Place Second in Gold Division at Ann Rhoads Shootout Bhavna Shetty (Photo by Ron Besser) center_img CALERA, Ala. – The No. 20 West Florida women’s golf team shot a second round 315, the best single round score at the tournament in their division, to place second in the Gold Division at the Ann Rhoads Birmingham-Southern Shootout at Timberline Golf Club on Monday.  Sophomore Bhavna Shetty (Mysore, India/Sadvidya HS) placed fourth overall to lead the Argonauts.Shetty was three strokes back of the three individual leaders, shooting 154 (79-75) to finish nine over par.  Senior Rachel Williams (Daytona Beach, Fla./Kennesaw State) also finished in the top 10, shooting a 159 (83-76) at 17 over par.Junior Natalia Espinosa (Bogotá, Colombia/Colegio Nueva Granada) placed 15th (82-81–163), and sophomore Tara Steakin (Wellington, Fla./Wellington HS) finished tied for 30th (90-83–173) and Meaghan Gulliksen tied for 39th (93-88–181) to round out the UWF lineup.UWF competed in the Gold Division, comprised of 11 schools from NCAA Divisions II and III, as well as NAIA.  Saint Leo took the team title (326-319–645), and Berry placed third (331-325–656).  Seven Division I schools competed in the Black Division, with Samford taking the title (79-68–147).West Florida will travel south to Lakeland to compete in the Lady Moc Classic hosted by Florida Southern on March 2-3.  For information on all UWF Athletics, visit www.GoArgos.com.#ARGOS#FINAL RESULTS1 St. Leo University 326  319    645       +772 West Florida, U of 334  315    649       +81 3 Berry College 331  325   656       +88  4 Montevallo, Univ. of 328  330    658       +90 5 Shorter College 338  324    662       +94 6 West Georgia, U. of 345  324    669      +101 7 Anderson Univ. (SC) 342  330    672      +104 8 Spring Hill College 351  354    705      +137 9 Mobile, U. of 354  358    712      +144 10 Lee University 369  362    731      +163 11 Huntingdon College 425  427    852      +2844 Bhavna Shetty 79   75    154  +129 Rachel Williams 83   76    159  +17T15 Natalia Espinosa 82   81    163  +21T30 Tara Steakin 90   83    173  +31T39 Meaghan Gulliksen 93   88    181  +39Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

England spot camera ‘spy’ at Rugby World Cup training

first_imgDSWD Bicol donates P1.5M worth of food packs for Taal eruption evacuees Daybreak as smoke, ash billows from Taal volcano PLAY LIST 01:04Daybreak as smoke, ash billows from Taal volcano01:05Poor visibility, nakaapekto sa maraming lugar sa Batangas03:028,000 pulis sa Region 4-A, tuloy ang trabaho03:57Phivolcs, nahihirapan sa komunikasyon sa Taal01:04Sold-out: Stores run out of face masks after Taal spews ash01:45Iran police shoot at those protesting plane shootdown The coach even admitted that he “used to do it” himself but hasn’t done so since 2001.Jones, who was in charge of his native Wallabies when they lost the 2003 World Cup final to England, was appointed to the England job shortly after the team’s miserable first-round exit on home soil in 2015.They now face an All Blacks side bidding to lift the Webb Ellis Cup for the third time in a row, and the fourth in New Zealand’s history.– ‘No one thinks we can win’ –The title-holders were hugely impressive in a 46-14 quarter-final thrashing of Ireland, while England reached the last four with an almost-as-emphatic 40-16 victory over Australia.Nevertheless, Jones insisted the team was not under any pressure, asking the press-conference crowd to put up their hand if they thought England could win.ADVERTISEMENT “There you go, so no one. No one thinks we can win,” he said.Jones, the coach of the Japan side that enjoyed a huge upset win over South Africa at the 2015 World Cup, joked that “there are 120 million Japanese people out there whose second team are the All Blacks. So there’s no pressure on us.”Meanwhile he was adamant that New Zealand were in a very different situation.“They’ve got to be thinking about how they’re looking for their third World Cup (in a row) and so that brings some pressure,” said Jones.The coach has long had a reputation for pre-match ‘mind games’ in the build-up to a Test.When asked if he was making these comments in the expectation they would be read by All Blacks players, Jones laid into the New Zealand media for the supposed partisan nature of their rugby coverage.“Well someone has to ask them (the All Blacks) a question because the New Zealand media doesn’t –- you guys are just fans with a keyboard,” he said.“The English media –- a week ago I was going to get sacked, we couldn’t play — we deal with a completely different situation.” Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next 2 village execs nabbed in Bohol buy-bust England’s players take part in a training session at the Arcs Urayasu Park in Urayasu on October 22,2019 during the Japan 2019 Rugby World Cup. (Photo by Anne-Christine POUJOULAT / AFP)England’s training session ahead of their upcoming Rugby World Cup semifinal was covertly filmed by an unknown sleuth, coach Eddie Jones said Tuesday.Most leading nations including England keep their practice secret, with strict limits on who is allowed into the ground to ensure opponents can’t spy on them ahead of a game.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES MOST READ 400 evacuees from Taal eruption take refuge in Mt. Banahaw Phivolcs: Cloud seeding in ashfall affected areas needs study Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Roger Federer praises Andy Murray’s Antwerp comeback success No need to wear face masks in Metro Manila, says scientist ‘People evacuated on their own’ “There was definitely someone in the apartment block filming but it might have been a Japanese fan,” said Jones, whose men face reigning champions New Zealand in Yokohama on Saturday.Access to training sessions is typically only given to accredited journalists, photographers and broadcast cameras.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSAndray Blatche has high praise for teammate Kai SottoSPORTSBig differenceSPORTSAlmazan status stays uncertain ahead of Game 4But the Australian appeared to shrug off the suspected infringement, saying that his team “don’t care” and that it “doesn’t change anything” due to the modern media ecosystem.“You can watch everyone’s training on YouTube. There’s no value in doing that sort of thing, absolutely zero,” Jones said. LOOK: Taal Volcano island 2 days after eruption ‘Gago’ View commentslast_img read more