38 Special’s Don Barnes: Fostering The Spirit of the Underdog

first_imgIt was back in the early 80’s, and the guys in 38 Special knew they had played to packed houses in the Northeast before, so why not play the huge Brendan Byrne Arena in New Jersey’s Meadowlands? I mean, they had a couple hit records and some hot FM radio singles like “Hold On Loosely” and “Caught Up In You” under their belt, so their confidence was brimming. But as band co-founder and sole survivor Don Barnes tells it, their management and handlers didn’t share the band’s belief they could fill the big venue.“They were all like, ‘You don’t really want to go in there and embarrass yourself, ‘cuz you might get like half house,’ ” Barnes said recently from the road, a place he knows well after 40 years out on it. “We kept thinkin’ that we have been back there so many times, we really feel like they would come out and see us. And they thought ‘Well, it’s your funeral, we’re gonna advise you against that, you might want to play a smaller venue, ‘ but we were pretty stubborn about it, and kept saying ‘No, we can do it.’ And buddy, let me tell ya, 24,000 people came out there, and they had to eat their words. That’s one of the cherished memories of up and coming, to finally reach that pinnacle.”It’s around 35 years later, and 38 Special has pretty much gone the way all the other big Southern rock bands have gone — except maybe the Allman Brothers — where arenas are no longer on the itinerary. But as with many of their counterparts, the baby boomers that showed up at the big gigs back then are still rabid fans today who love hearing the music of their youth, so packed clubs, theaters and festivals are still the order of the day, like the fifteen or so thousand who showed up at a recent outdoor show in Illinois. The last remaining member left from the original lineup, Barnes founded 38 Special with childhood pal and former 38 Special lead singer Donnie Van Zant while living in Jacksonville in 1974. Van Zant is the younger brother of the legendary Ronnie Van Zant, who fronted Lynyrd Skynyrd until his death in a plane crash in 1977, and the older sibling of Johnny Van Zant, who would eventually take over for Ronnie and who sings with Skynyrd today.“We grew up on the same street (as the Van Zants), when I was a kid,” the affable Barnes said. “Three guys who ended up in 38 Special also lived on Woodcrest Road. It was a big four lane road, and when we were young, our parents wouldn’t allow us to go on the other side of Woodcrest, that’s where the Van Zants lived. There were over there on the ‘bad side of town,’ the wrong side of the tracks kinda thing.”Barnes saw his buddies in Skynyrd slowly climbing their way towards success, so he and Van Zant decided they would give rock and roll a shot too. And the camraderie with the guys in what would become Skynyrd was a key component in Barnes learning the rock and roll ropes.“I was right there in the middle of all this history being made,” Barnes continued. “Ridin’ my bike to go to (Lynyrd Skynyrd guitarist) Allen Collins‘ house when I was 13 years old, him having some European English import records, and we’d sit down and we’d pick out guitar licks, and he would show me a few things. I mean, this was (one of the guys) who wrote “Free Bird” eventually, ya know. He would have a big Vox Super Beatle amp in his hallway and he’d just be rattling the windows when his Mom would come in from work, and she’d be so proud of her son. My mother would never let that happen in my house. And Ronnie, he was four years older and a big mentor as well for us.”Being a navy town, Jacksonville was full of venues the sailors would frequent on leave, and it gave budding young Southern rockers ample opportunities to play live and hone both their performing and songwriting chops.“They had four naval bases there,” Barnes said, “so all of us kids, I mean from Duane Allman and Gregg Allman to Ronnie Van Zant, everybody played the sailor’s clubs. We were fifteen years old making a hundred bucks a week, that was big money for a fifteen year old kid. There we learned the foundations, the structures of the craft of songwriting, playing the hits of the day, radio songs, and you realized it was a craft, there was a system to it where you have the A section and a B section and then a ramp that goes up to the chorus, and then the bridge and that kind of thing. You learned the structures at an early age. And then we’d get cocky and think, ‘Oh well I can write my own songs now.’ And that’s when you go starve for ten years.”Barnes and Van Zant played in “like, fifteen bands before 38 Special” and then began to pick up the stronger guys from other local groups as they began to focus on their big dream.“It started like any band, you play in somebody’s garage and get the cops called on you for playing too loud. But you really tried to get guys who would commit to it. Skynyrd was kinda just taking off and we thought that we were really gonna be serious about it. But it was hard, we all had day jobs too. I wouldn’t recommend it to many kids today, because you work so so hard, and there are no guarantees, and you can give 110% and still not make it. But it does build character, I guess.”After conquering the local bar scene, 38 Special sucked it up taking warm up slots often on three act bills playing mostly to alot of yet-to-be-filled chairs, but to their major credit, they played as if their lives depended on it, keeping the standards high no matter what the crowd was. And it turned out that being humble and working hard was well worth the effort.“We tried to act like we were the headliner, ya know like God help who was following us, we tried to throw it all down at ’em, so hopefully they would go home and tell somebody. Just keeping that high standard. We felt like if we got a couple of sentences at the bottom of the review the next day, you know it’d say, ‘Peter Frampton did blah blah, and Gary Wright did this, and 38 Special delivered a lively set at 7 0’clock,’ we thought wow, that could mean something! But it never really did.”Along with the Van Zants, Barnes and his 38 Special boys, and the Allman Brothers, Jacksonville was also a rock and roll breeding ground for the likes of former Eagle Don Felder, Stephen Stills and in nearby Gainesville, Tom Petty, among others. So what was it about this Florida navy town that made it a mecca for young soon-to-be rock superstars?“People ask what’s in the water down there, I don’t know,” Barnes said. “But I’ll tell ya, comin’ from the west side of Jacksonville, it’s pretty much no man’s land, you either end up drivin’ a truck or goin’ to prison or something. I really think there’s a thread of that underdog spirit, ya know, that comes from not being from New York or L.A. so you really gotta show your stuff to people, you gotta put it in their face, get out there and make your statement. I think that’s what the underlying aggression, the big strong guitars, ya know, “Listen to me!” You’re there screamin’ at people, basically to pay attention, because you’re not fashionable, you’re not from a hip place. I think that common thread of the underdog spirit is what is prevalent with all those people.”After two middling albums in the mid-70’s kept the band a relative unknown outside of the South, 38 Special shifted into more of an arena-style Southern rock sound and got some attention in 1980 with their third effort Rockin’ Into The Night, but it would be their next two albums Wild Eyed Southern Boys (1981) and Special Forces (1982) that would vault them up onto that elusive next level of stardom. Two Barnes-penned and sung singles, “Hold on Loosely and “Caught Up In You”, were the lightning in the bottle that got them that coveted heavy FM radio airplay and seats began filling in arenas. But Barnes is quick to point out that the road to making it is long and arduous, and can sometimes temper the success.“It’s such a long road, and it’s tiny baby steps at a time, and when things started happening, you’re a little bit anxious about it all because you worked so hard for so long. It took a lot longer than we thought it would, ya know, we’d do interviews and people would ask, ‘How do you feel now that you’ve made it?’ and we were just so weary. Our management was always about pushing forward, saying don’t be complacent, because there are bigger things to get. If I had to do it all over again, I’d try to enjoy myself a little bit more. Because it was always about push push push all the time, there were times when we’d do nine months of a tour to promote the record, then you’d have to do another record, but you have no songs written, not one note, and you’re so burned out from the road.”Barnes left the band in 1987 — “It had been ten years of absolute pushing and I was worn out”– and had a solid solo album done and ready for release, but it never saw the light of day, becoming a casualty of the sale of A & M Records. It was a crushing blow for Barnes: “I went on vacation after that, I said I’m going to the islands somewhere, and I did.” He eventually rallied and rejoined 38 Special in 1992, and has been the driving force and band anchor ever since. “I picked up right where I left off,” he said. “There were no ill feelings. Once we lit it all back up, it was all back, the formula was there. We kept going onward and upward, ya know.”What keeps Don Barnes — or any of his fellow Southern rock survivors for that matter who are still out there banging away four decades later (like Henry Paul with the Outlaws, Doug Gray with the Marshall Tucker Band and Gary Rossington with Lynyrd Skynyrd) — still working hard out there on the road, playing dozens of shows a year to adoring fans, after all this time? It’s all about using the emotion of the songs they remember to create an experience for those fans, and giving them something special every night.“I guess it’s that instant reaction in people’s faces,” Barnes said. “These songs have a history all their own, so when we go out there, we take the crowd up, up, up up and they are just manic at the end because we’re unfolding all the history from the beginning. We’re there to make sure they have the greatest time. We see ’em singing along, giving each other high fives, clapping and yelling, and we also see tears in someone’s eyes if a song reminds them of something or someone. And you see these kids, they’ve learned about all the songs through games and stuff. That is the fuel right there, seeing something you created from that long ago, that after all the scratching and all the suffering, it really worked out OK. You really mean something to these people. It really is special to us.”last_img read more

The Best Buckley AFB Schools: Daycare – High School (2021 Edition)

first_imgIntroductionSo you’ve just been assigned to Buckley Air Force Base. There’s a ton of things for you to do, but if you’re a parent, one of the first things you need to do when relocating to a new area is figure out where your kids are going to go to school and what your options are when it comes to childcare. You’ve got several choices here, whether you opt for a public or private school. Choosing the best school district is a big part of that. Luckily, there are several options available to you.Suggested Read: Buckley AFB: In-Depth Welcome Center Schools in Buckley AFBBuckley AFB Child CareBuckley Air Force Base offers two Child Care Centers that accept children from 6 weeks old to kindergarten age. A-Basin CDC offers space for 150 children, while Crested Butte CDC has space for 215. Both have waiting lists, and parents will have to register their children. Parents will have to create an account on militarychildcare.com to request childcare.Aurora Public School DistrictIf you live in privatized housing on Buckley Air Force base, you will be a part of the Aurora Public School District. You can find their information below:Aurora Public School DistrictEducational Services Center 115701 E. 1st Ave.Aurora, CO 80011Phone: 303-344-8060There are four schools that serve those who live on-base: one goes from pre-kindergarten to eighth grade. Another goes from kindergarten to eighth grade. There’s also a school that goes from pre-k to post-secondary, and a high school that covers 9th-12th grade.Elementary/Middle Schools in Buckley AFB1. Edna and John W. Mosley, P-855 N. Salida WayAurora, CO 80011Phone: 1 (303) 366-28072. Murphy Creek, P-81400 S. Old Tom Morris Rd.Aurora, CO 80018Phone: 1 (303) 366-05793. Vista PEAK Exploratory, P-824551 E 1st AveAurora, CO 80018Phone: 1 (303) 364-3757High Schools in Buckley AFB4. Vista Peak Preparatory, 9 -1224500 E. 6th Ave.Aurora, CO 80018Phone: 1 (303) 340-01215. Vista Peak Preparatory, 9 -121300 S. Sable BlvdAurora, CO 80012Phone: 1 (303) 755-7160Schools Near Buckley AFBFamilies living off-base have several great schools and daycare facilities to choose from in Aurora, Arapahoe County, and the greater Denver area. Check out the websites below to get more information.Daycares Near Buckley AFBMaking a decision about who should take care of your child can be hard. When you’re on the hunt for the right daycare facility or in-home daycare service, it helps to search for places like Care.com and Yelp for reviews. It also helps to visit any facilities you might be considering, as well.Public Schools Near Buckley AFBFamilies that choose to live off-base will have to enroll in a school within the district associated with their address. Public school districts generally don’t allow out-of-district enrollment. There are three public school districts near Buckley Air Force Base:1. Aurora Public Schools DistrictEducational Services Center 115701 E. 1st Ave.Aurora, CO 80011Phone: 1 (303) 344-8060Aurora Public Schools is the district that serves most of the area around Buckley Air Force Base. Most kids in the area will likely be enrolled at one of the 27 elementary schools, 6 P-8 schools, 7 middle schools, or 8 high schools if you don’t live on-base. The district’s site has a tool to locate the school closest to you based on your new address.2. Cherry Creek School District4700 South Yosemite StreetGreenwood Village, CO 80111Phone: 1 (303) 773-1184The Cherry Creek School District serves over 55,000 students across 8 municipalities in grades pre-k through 12th. It contains 45 elementary schools, 15 middle schools, and eight high schools. Their website includes a detailed directory dedicated to helping parents understand the ins and outs of athletics, health and wellness, college and career, transportation, and other services the district has to offer.3. Denver Public Schools District1860 Lincoln StreetDenver, CO 80203Phone: 1 (720) 423-3200The Denver Public School District serves over 93,000 students and is home to dozens of schools at every level, so finding the right one for your children might take a little work. Luckily, their website has a tool that can help you locate the school closest to you. The website also has detailed information on school choice, transportation, and other resources available to families within the district.Private Schools Near Buckley Air Force BaseParents who opt to send their children to a private school near Buckley Air Force Base will have no shortage of options. According to the Private School Review, there are 53 private schools in the area. While there are several that are religiously affiliated, many are nonsectarian. Here are some of the best private schools in Arapahoe County.1. Aspen Academy5859 S University BlvdGreenwood Village, CO 80121Phone: 1 (303) 346-3500Aspen Academy was established in 2005 and is a nonsectarian school. The school serves a little over 400 students, but keeps its class sizes small. There are about 8 students per teacher, and an average of 16 students in a class.2. Humanex Academy2700 S Zuni StreetEnglewood, CO 80110Phone: 1 (303) 783-0137Humanex Academy is an independent, nontraditional nonsectarian school serving children with learning differences like ADHD and autism. The school serves students in grades 6-12. With a small student of about 35 students and an average class size of 8 students, Humanex is an impressive school that meets a specific need.3. Saint Mary’s Academy4545 S University BlvdEnglewood, CO 80113Phone: 1 (303) 762-8300Saint Mary’s Academy is a Catholic school that was founded in 1874. The school is co-educational from K-8th grade and also has an All Girls High School. The school is noted for academic excellence and has a high percentage of faculty members with advanced degrees. Saint Mary’s serves nearly 700 students, but class sizes are small, with an average of 15 students per class.4. All Souls Catholic School4951 S Pennsylvania St.Englewood, CO 80113Phone: 1 (303) 789-2155All Souls Catholic School is affiliated with the church of the same name. The school serves students from K-8th grade and has a rather large population of 390 students. The ratio of students to teachers, however, is rarely low at 21:1.5. Ambleside School of Colorado1510 E. Phillips AvenueLittleton, CO 80122Phone: 1 (720) 468-0464Ambleside is a K-8 school with a small population of a little over 100 students. This allows them to keep class sizes small – around 15 students per class. The school touts a challenging academic curriculum that focuses on art, nature study, music, math, and science.ConclusionMoving is stressful, and finding the best school or daycare for your child can be a time-consuming process. Thankfully, there are plenty of options in and around Buckley Air Force Base and the larger Denver area to make sure your child’s mental and physical well-being will be taken care of. We hope the above information helps make your search easier and allows you to spend more time with your family as you settle in.last_img read more

Possible Serie A Shutdown Looms after Inter Fan’s Death

first_imgSerie A could be suspended after an Inter Milan supporter died following a fight with Napoli fans in which four people were stabbed.The 35-year-old Inter fan is believed to have been rushed to hospital after being hit by a van which, according to reports in Italy, was being driven by Napoli fans an hour before kick-off at the San Siro on Wednesday.He underwent emergency surgery but died from his injuries.It was also reported in the Italian press that rival fans had been armed with chains and hammers and around 60 people were involved in the brawl.Italian FA president Gabriele Gravina has threatened to stop league games from taking place following the tragic incident.Inter won 1-0 with Napoli having two players sent off, including Kalidou Koulibaly. The Senegal international defender was subjected to racial abuse with the away side asking for the match to be halted after the 27-year-old was repeatedly subjected to monkey noises.Gravina said the racist chants and violence outside the stadium were “no longer tolerable”.“Football is the heritage of true supporters and as such should be defended from all those who use it as a tool to create tension,” he said.“We condemn all forms of both physical and verbal violence, with the aggravating circumstance of racial discrimination. We do not tolerate such behaviour ruining football.”The Mayor of Milan, Giuseppe Sala, made a public apology on Thursday, describing the racist chanting as a ‘shameful act’ and asking Koulibaly’s forgiveness.“The boos aimed at Koulibaly were shameful,” said Sala on Facebook. “A shameful act towards a true athlete who wears the colour of his skin with pride.”The mayor, who was at the San Siro for the match, said he would continue to go to games but would not tolerate any racist chanting.“I will continue to watch Inter but at the first chant I will make a small gesture. I will get up and leave. I will do it for myself, aware that whoever abuses a black athlete won’t give a damn about me,” said Sala.“I apologise to Kalidou Koulibaly on my own behalf and on behalf of the people of Milan who testify to feeling that we are brothers even in these difficult times.”Napoli boss Carlo Ancelotti revealed that the staff had asked the referee three times to suspend the match because of the chants.“The solution exists,” Ancelotti told Sky. “You have to stop the match. You just have to know when, after how many announcements. And if we don’t know, then next time we may have to stop play ourselves.”Koulibaly apologised on Twitter for the defeat and being sent off but said, “I am proud of the colour of my skin, to be French, Senegalese, Neapolitan: a man.”Meanwhile, Inter will play two home league games behind closed doors following the racist abuse of Koulibaly.The Italian side will also play a third match at the San Siro without opening the ‘curva’ section of the ground, popular with the ultras.Inter’s next three home league games are against Sassuolo on January 19, Bologna on February 3 and Sampdoria on February 17.Relatedlast_img read more

SBP accepts Yeng Guiao resignation at Gilas helm, commends coach

first_imgLATEST STORIES LOOK: Taal Volcano island 2 days after eruption Guiao was first tapped to call the shots for Gilas in the 2018 Asian Games where he guided the country to its best finish in 16 years before being appointed to officially replace Chot Reyes in time for the fourth window of the Fiba World Cup Asian Qualifiers.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Robredo to visit Batangas families displaced by Taal erruption SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold PLAY LIST 06:27SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold00:50Trending Articles01:45Explosive Gilas Pilipinas not yet at its best, says Tim Cone01:52Phivolcs: Cloud seeding in ashfall affected areas needs study01:04Daybreak as smoke, ash billows from Taal volcano01:05Poor visibility, nakaapekto sa maraming lugar sa Batangas03:028,000 pulis sa Region 4-A, tuloy ang trabaho03:57Phivolcs, nahihirapan sa komunikasyon sa Taal01:04Sold-out: Stores run out of face masks after Taal spews ash View comments LOOK: Kryz Uy, Slater Young expecting first son La Salle blows lead, escapes NU for first win on Kurt Lojera winner Residents rescue horses, farm animals left on volcano island Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Yeng Guiao. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—Al Panlilio, president of the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas, said the governing body for basketball in the country has accepted Yeng Guiao’s decision to step down as head coach of Gilas Pilipinas.Panlilio also lauded Guiao for not backing down from the challenge when he took on the head-coaching role for the national team last year despite the timing and circumstances.ADVERTISEMENT No need to wear face masks in Metro Manila, says scientist “Coach Yeng Guiao had the unenviable task of picking up the pieces for Gilas Pilipinas Men. Even if the odds were stacked against him from the start, he took on the challenge head on and gave it his best shot,” Panlilio said in a statement Wednesday. “His selection to take over was unanimous and it spoke volumes about the respect that he has gained throughout his career from all members of the Philippine basketball community.”“It is with a heavy heart that we accept coach Yeng’s resignation as the head coach of Gilas Pilipinas men. The SBP thanks him for his contributions and wishes him well in all his future endeavors.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSAndray Blatche has high praise for teammate Kai SottoSPORTSBig differenceSPORTSAlmazan status stays uncertain ahead of Game 4READ: Guiao steps down as Gilas head coachGuiao resigned just three days after the Philippine team went winless in the 2019 Fiba World Cup in China. Taal Volcano’s lava fountain weakens, but Phivolcs says it’s not sign of slowing down Teen dead, another hurt in vehicular collision in Santiago City MOST READ Heart Evangelista, Kim Chiu, more celebs appeal for animal rescue after Taal eruptionlast_img read more