Siemens Healthineers shipping laboratory-based antibody test to detect SARS-CoV-2 IgM, IgG antibodies

first_imgSiemens Healthineers shipping laboratory-based antibody test to detect SARS-CoV-2 IgM, IgG antibodies Phoenix Business Consulting invests in telehealth platform Healpha News The test received CE mark, data has demonstrated 100 per cent sensitivity, 99.8 percent specificitySiemens Healthineers recently announced that it is now shipping worldwide its laboratory-based total antibody test (1) to detect the presence of SARS-CoV-2 IgM and IgG antibodies in blood. The test received the CE mark and data has demonstrated 100 per cent sensitivity (2) and 99.8 percent specificity. The total antibody test allows for identification of patients who have developed an adaptive immune response, which indicates recent infection or prior exposure (3).The company is prepared to ramp up production as the pandemic evolves with capacity exceeding 50 million tests per month across its platforms starting in June. Siemens Healthineers is poised to increase production at the company’s Walpole (Walpole, Mass) and Glasgow (Newark, Del) facilities.The antibody test is now available on the largest installed base in the US and one of the largest in the world with 20,000 Siemens Healthineers systems installed worldwide. This includes the Atellica Solution immunoassay analyser, which can run up to 440 tests per hour (4) and enables a result in just 10 minutes. By detecting both IgM and IgG antibodies, the test provides a clearer clinical picture over a longer period of time as the disease progresses.Importantly, the test detects antibodies to a key protein on the surface of the SARS-CoV-2 virus—a spike protein, which binds the virus to cells with a distinct human receptor found in lungs, heart, multiple organs and blood vessels. Studies indicate that certain (neutralising) antibodies to the spike protein can disarm SARS-CoV-2, presumably by interfering with the ability of the virus to bind, penetrate and infect human cells. Multiple potential vaccines in development for SARS-CoV-2 include the spike protein within their focus.“Not all antibody tests are created equal. A high-quality test that targets the right protein and is highly scalable is essential for antibody testing to help ensure we effectively manage the threat of COVID-19,” said Deepak Nath, President, Laboratory Diagnostics, Siemens Healthineers. “Siemens Healthineers sought to provide a highly accurate antibody test that could reach millions of people to address the current need for identifying immune response, and also for delivering long-term value as we look toward immunity and vaccination.”The total antibody test also is available on the company’s expansive installed base of ADVIA Centaur XP and XPT analysers, which can test up to 240 samples per hour, with a result in 18 minutes. Comparable tests for Siemens Healthineers Dimension Vista and Dimension EXL systems also are being pursued (5), with a view to realise clinical reach. The company intends to develop an IgG test to provide flexibility for testing needs as the pandemic evolves (5).About the Siemens Healthineers SARS-CoV-2 molecular testSiemens Healthineers also announced that the FDA issued an EUA on May 5 for its molecular PCR Fast Track Diagnostics (FTD) SARS-CoV-2 Assay (6) test kit, which can detect the virus that causes COVID-19. The FTD SARS-CoV-2 Assay also is CE marked for diagnostic use in the EU since April 24. In method comparison studies, the real-time PCR test has shown 100 per cent positive percentage agreement and 100 per cent negative percentage agreement (7). The molecular test, of which more than 500,000 have already been sold in Europe, is compatible with many lab platforms and evaluates two targets in one test tube, detecting two genes with less test preparation. Sample-to-answer time, including extraction and generating the result, takes 2-3 hours, depending on the molecular system and lab resources employed.“I’m proud of our team who saw the societal need and mobilised very quickly to bring this high-quality, diagnostic test to the US market,” said Nath. “Siemens Healthineers now offers the broadest portfolio of high-quality tests for SARS-CoV-2 to help address the global pandemic. Our tests arm healthcare professionals with the information they need to accurately detect SARS-CoV-2, assess disease severity and therapeutic response, and aid care management for patients with comorbidities or complications such as escalated immune response or sudden development of coagulation disorders. These tests will assist clinicians with more timely interventions that can result in better patient outcomes.”To meet demand, the company plans to ship more than 2.5 million molecular PCR tests per month worldwide as production capacity increases in May and June. The FTD SARS-CoV-2 Assay can be run on equipment widely used in laboratories worldwide and may be run simultaneously with Siemens Healthineers FTD Respiratory Pathogens 21 8 and FTD FLU / HRSV 8 molecular syndromic testing panels that identify a wide range of pathogens that can cause acute respiratory infections.About Siemens Healthineers commitment to COVID-19 testingIn addition to the antibody and molecular tests, Siemens Healthineers offers a broad diagnostics portfolio to aid in the prognosis, treatment and follow up of COVID-19 patients. The company’s broad and differentiated menu includes haematology, coagulation, cardiac, respiratory, inflammation and infectious disease panels. Blood gas and imaging solutions from Siemens Healthineers deliver actionable results that aid clinicians in caring for COVID-19 patients.References: 1 CE-marked for sale in the EU. This test has not been reviewed by the FDA. In the US, use of this test is limited to laboratories that are certified under Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA) to perform high-complexity testing. Product availability may vary by country and is subject to regulatory requirements.2 ≥ 14 days post-PCR positive test3 Product claims, including intended use, are applicable to the CE-marked assay. These claims have not been authorised by FDA.4 Dependent upon test mix.5 Under development. Not available for sale. Future availability cannot be guaranteed.6 CE-marked for sale in the EU. This test has not been FDA cleared or approved. This test has been authorised by FDA under an EUA for use by authorised laboratories. This test has been authorised only for the detection of nucleic acid from SARS-CoV-2, not for any other viruses or pathogens. This test is only authorised for the duration of the declaration that circumstances exist justifying the authorisation of emergency use of in vitro diagnostics for detection and / or diagnosis of COVID-19 under Section 564(b)(1) of the Act, 21. U.S.C. § 360bbb-3(b)(1), unless the authorisation is terminated or revoked sooner. Product availability may vary by country and is subject to regulatory requirements.7 In method comparison studies, FTD SARS-CoV-2 has shown Positive Percent Agreement: 100 per cent (91.8-100, 95% per cent CI) and Negative Percent Agreement: 100 per cent (88.7-100, 95 per cent CI) when tested in Copan eSwab nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs.8 CE-marked for sale in the EU. Research Use Only (RUO) in the US. ADVIA Centaur XPCE* markClinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988COVID-19FTD SARS-CoV-2 AssayIgG antibodiesPCR Fast Track DiagnosticsSARS-CoV-2 AssaySARS-CoV-2 IgMSiemens HealthineersUS FDA Read Article Menopause to become the next game-changer in global femtech solutions industry by 2025 Comments (0) Heartfulness group of organisations launches ‘Healthcare by Heartfulness’ COVID care app By EH News Bureau on May 28, 2020 WHO tri-regional policy dialogue seeks solutions to challenges facing international mobility of health professionals Add Comment Related Posts MaxiVision Eye Hospitals launches “Mucormycosis Early Detection Centre” Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals releases first “Comprehensive Textbook of COVID-19” Share The missing informal workers in India’s vaccine storylast_img read more

Prime Minister to Speak on Child Safety and Security on May 28

first_imgStory HighlightsPrime Minister, the Most Hon. Portia Simpson Miller, will be the main speaker at a community meeting scheduled to take place on Thursday, May 28, at the Edwin Allen Comprehensive High School in Clarendon, beginning at 3:30 p.m.The meeting, organised by the Ministry of Youth and Culture and held under the aegis of the Prime Minister, is aimed at heightening awareness of child safety and security. It is also being held to educate community members on their role in protecting children. RelatedAll Jamaicans Must Stand In The Interest Of Children – PM Photo: JIS PhotographerPrime Minister, the Most Hon. Portia Simpson Miller, is surrounded by excited students of the Liberty Academy at the Priory in St. Andrew, who clamoured to greet her following her address at the institution’s ‘Girls Day’ event on May 19. Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Portia Simpson Miller, will be the main speaker at a community meeting scheduled to take place on Thursday, May 28, at the Edwin Allen Comprehensive High School in Clarendon, beginning at 3:30 p.m.The meeting, organised by the Ministry of Youth and Culture and held under the aegis of the Prime Minister, is aimed at heightening awareness of child safety and security. It is also being held to educate community members on their role in protecting children.Minister of Youth and Culture, Hon. Lisa Hanna, is expected to bring the opening remarks. Other speakers are: Minister of National Security, Hon. Peter Bunting; Minister of Justice, Senator the Hon. Mark Golding; Minister of Health, Hon. Dr. Fenton Ferguson and Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Education, Elaine Foster-Allen.Speaking earlier on the Jamaica Information Service (JIS) current affairs programme, ‘Issues and Answers’, Minister  Hanna said the Prime Minister will be engaged in “courageous conversations” with residents at the meeting.She added that the Prime Minister will also outline what the Government is doing and has done to arrest child abuse and to protect children.There will also be a cultural item from students of the Edwin Allen Comprehensive High School. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Prime Minister to Speak on Child Safety and Security on May 28 Prime MinisterMay 27, 2015Written by: Elaine Hartman Reckordcenter_img Prime Minister to Speak on Child Safety and Security on May 28JIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Advertisements RelatedGovt Will Consult With Business Community Before Making Decisions – PM RelatedPJ Patterson Hailed As Nation Builderlast_img read more

African-American jockey breaks records, competition at Indiana Grand

first_imgSeveral years later, Franklin has fulfilled his dream. He’s a successful horse jockey, and the risky sport has taken him to New York, Florida and now Indiana.“He will probably come racing in on two wheels,” laughs Tammy Knox, race marketing manager at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino as she speaks to the barn gate operator.A few moments later, Franklin swiftly rounded the corner of the barn in his black pickup truck. He quickly jumped out dressed in a black and white plaid shirt, jeans and a contagious grin. The 25-year-old had just left from competing in a race in Lexington, Ky.An upcoming 120-day meet, beginning April 21, will mark Franklin’s third season at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino in Shelbyville, Ind. His Indiana journey began in 2013 when he rewrote the record books for his competition. He earned 43 wins at the conclusion of the season, picked up his first leading rider title and declared himself a top contender for the 2014 crown. He also became the first jockey in Indiana Grand history to eclipse the $3 million mark in purse earnings in one season.Franklin’s road to success as a jockey began in childhood.“My godmother used to keep me when I was younger and my godfather worked at the racetrack and farm,” Franklin said. “She would take him lunch every day and I would ride along. I knew I wanted a job and I saw a few younger kids out there working.”After speaking with the racetrack’s owner, Franklin got his first job at just 11 years old. He cleaned stalls and assisted with the horses’ daily routine. He said “the rest is history.”Franklin admits there are very few African-Americans in his chosen sport. When asked how racial differences has affected his career and competition, Franklin noted that horse racing began as an African-American sport, but whites and mostly Hispanics are dominating the racetrack these days.“It’s very few of us,” he said. “But for the most part I don’t look at it as a racial thing because I try to keep the same personality with everyone. I’ve had very few incidents where someone has said something racial, but I usually make them mad by killing them with kindness.”As advice for others wanting to pursue this sport, he admits there are a few things to consider such as lots of traveling.“To do this you have to love horses. You can’t say ‘I’m just in it for the money.’ You have to genuinely love horses. Every time I’m around a horse I try to communicate with them well and hope they can run good for me,” he mentioned.In 2005 Franklin rode in his first race at Colonial Downs in Virginia on a horse named Fred Bob. He recalls being extremely nervous.“He was a horse that wasn’t so good but he was just one to gain experience with. It was a night race and the last race of the day. I was nervous and pacing back and forth. I got there about five hours before it was time to ride and I kept going to the bathroom,” laughs Franklin.He also remembers falling off a horse for the first time at age 11. He laughed, and said, “I was dead scared for about two weeks, but I kept getting back on.”However, in October of 2013, he experienced one of the greatest risks a jockey could face— falling during a race. “I was coming around the corner and about to whip the horse and next thing I know she was just going down. Everything happened so fast,” he said. “I remember lying on the ground and rolling over. I moved my right leg but couldn’t move my left and the first thing that came to my mind was ‘oh, it’s just bruised, I’ll just have to soak it.’”With adrenaline pumping, Franklin couldn’t tell how bad his injury was. Once emergency personnel arrived, snatched off his boot and cut open his pants leg, the area around his knee began to swell immediately. The first question Franklin asked was, “can I ride tomorrow?”He adds that he never second-guessed his recovery after the injury because he focused on a positive outcome.“He really is a great kid,” said Knox. “Last year we took five jockeys to visit the oncology floor at Riley Children’s Hospital in Indianapolis and Malcolm was one of them.”Although more than 600 miles from his home state, Franklin remains in contact with those who have helped him along the way, especially his mother and uncle who he calls his “biggest supporters.”When his racing days are over, Franklin said he would like a career in construction or as a mechanic, interests he already pursues in his spare time. He also enjoys the outdoors, particularly fishing, and riding dirt bikes and four wheelers.With Indiana Grand Racing & Casino’s racing season beginning soon, Franklin said he’s excited.“I feel very good about this season. Every day I go out and risk my life and hope I do a good job. I want not only to be successful, but to be safe,” mentioned Franklin.© 2015 Indianapolis Recorder Newspaper. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. While most kids his age talked about becoming doctors, lawyers and astronauts, Malcolm Franklin already knew what he wanted to do with his life. Not only was the 11-year-old secure in his decision, he practiced his skills everyday on the racetrack. Linscott PhotographyDuring summers in Creston, S.C., Malcolm Franklin sharpened his jockey skills.center_img http://www.indianapolisrecorder.com/news/article_3f484f06-e444-11e4-b941-5f7daf31596b.html?mode=image&photo=0,Several years later, Franklin has fulfilled his dream. He’s a successful horse jockey, and the risky sport has taken him to New York, Florida and now Indiana.“He will probably come racing in on two wheels,” laughs Tammy Knox, race marketing manager at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino as she speaks to the barn gate operator.A few moments later, Franklin swiftly rounded the corner of the barn in his black pickup truck. He quickly jumped out dressed in a black and white plaid shirt, jeans and a contagious grin. The 25-year-old had just left from competing in a race in Lexington, Ky.An upcoming 120-day meet, beginning April 21, will mark Franklin’s third season at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino in Shelbyville, Ind. His Indiana journey began in 2013 when he rewrote the record books for his competition. He earned 43 wins at the conclusion of the season, picked up his first leading rider title and declared himself a top contender for the 2014 crown. He also became the first jockey in Indiana Grand history to eclipse the $3 million mark in purse earnings in one season.Franklin’s road to success as a jockey began in childhood.“My godmother used to keep me when I was younger and my godfather worked at the racetrack and farm,” Franklin said. “She would take him lunch every day and I would ride along. I knew I wanted a job and I saw a few younger kids out there working.”After speaking with the racetrack’s owner, Franklin got his first job at just 11 years old. He cleaned stalls and assisted with the horses’ daily routine. He said “the rest is history.”Franklin admits there are very few African-Americans in his chosen sport. When asked how racial differences has affected his career and competition, Franklin noted that horse racing began as an African-American sport, but whites and mostly Hispanics are dominating the racetrack these days.“It’s very few of us,” he said. “But for the most part I don’t look at it as a racial thing because I try to keep the same personality with everyone. I’ve had very few incidents where someone has said something racial, but I usually make them mad by killing them with kindness.”As advice for others wanting to pursue this sport, he admits there are a few things to consider such as lots of traveling.“To do this you have to love horses. You can’t say ‘I’m just in it for the money.’ You have to genuinely love horses. Every time I’m around a horse I try to communicate with them well and hope they can run good for me,” he mentioned.In 2005 Franklin rode in his first race at Colonial Downs in Virginia on a horse named Fred Bob. He recalls being extremely nervous.“He was a horse that wasn’t so good but he was just one to gain experience with. It was a night race and the last race of the day. I was nervous and pacing back and forth. I got there about five hours before it was time to ride and I kept going to the bathroom,” laughs Franklin.He also remembers falling off a horse for the first time at age 11. He laughed, and said, “I was dead scared for about two weeks, but I kept getting back on.”However, in October of 2013, he experienced one of the greatest risks a jockey could face— falling during a race. “I was coming around the corner and about to whip the horse and next thing I know she was just going down. Everything happened so fast,” he said. “I remember lying on the ground and rolling over. I moved my right leg but couldn’t move my left and the first thing that came to my mind was ‘oh, it’s just bruised, I’ll just have to soak it.’”With adrenaline pumping, Franklin couldn’t tell how bad his injury was. Once emergency personnel arrived, snatched off his boot and cut open his pants leg, the area around his knee began to swell immediately. The first question Franklin asked was, “can I ride tomorrow?”He adds that he never second-guessed his recovery after the injury because he focused on a positive outcome.“He really is a great kid,” said Knox. “Last year we took five jockeys to visit the oncology floor at Riley Children’s Hospital in Indianapolis and Malcolm was one of them.”Although more than 600 miles from his home state, Franklin remains in contact with those who have helped him along the way, especially his mother and uncle who he calls his “biggest supporters.”When his racing days are over, Franklin said he would like a career in construction or as a mechanic, interests he already pursues in his spare time. He also enjoys the outdoors, particularly fishing, and riding dirt bikes and four wheelers.With Indiana Grand Racing & Casino’s racing season beginning soon, Franklin said he’s excited.“I feel very good about this season. Every day I go out and risk my life and hope I do a good job. I want not only to be successful, but to be safe,” mentioned Franklin.© 2015 Indianapolis Recorder Newspaper. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

UIW’s Ifunanya Mora Named Academic All-America Third Team

first_imgTOWSON, Md. – University of the Incarnate Word senior guard Ifunanya Mora was named Capital One Academic All-America® Women’s Basketball Third Team on Thursday, as selected by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA).Mora, who hails from Grand Prairie, Texas, is a biology major with a perfect 4.00 GPA.  She is a four-year starter for the Cardinals and become the 11th player in school history to score 1,000 career points this year.  She is the school’s all-time leader in blocks, free throws made and attempted.  She is among the top 10 in school history in points, rebounds, assists and steals.  She is a two-time First Team Academic All-District selection.To be eligible for Academic All-America consideration, a student-athlete must be a varsity starter or key reserve, maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.30 on a scale of 4.00 and have reached sophomore athletic and academic standings at his/her current institution.last_img read more

#Nextchat RECAP: Recruiter’s Handbook

first_imgOn September 5, @shrmnextchat chatted with special guest speaker, author, and leadership and management consultant @Sharlyn_Lauby on the Recruiter’s Handbook.If you missed this excellent chat on the building blocks of a strong recruiting program, you can read all the tweets here:last_img

Your Website Is More Than Great Design

first_img 2. The CSSP heavy-duty blog is working to gain lots of authority (MOZ rank of 4 and 724 inbound links) but they need to consider renaming the articles with keywords and not numbers in order to maximize these posts.  Last Google visit was almost two weeks ago and with the content CSSP generates, spider visits should be much more frequent. with Prashant Kaw, we reviewed three websites: one relatively new; another one that was a consolidation of several geographically far-flung sister sites; and one that has been around for over a decade.  They were all “NOT PRETTY” in the standard, graphically-enhanced marketer view of the world.  But, each site worked for the marketer responsible for lead flow.   More importantly, each site had some opportunities for optimization and improvement despite decent Website Grader scores.  The marketer on the call for each of review walked away with ideas for increasing their Search Engine presence, their Social Media efforts, and Lead Generation. Join HubSpot experts for a live session of website review and optimization, providing tips for getting found online. Twitter handle Topics: 2. Move the blog from blogspot.com to the Sweet Grace website as soon as possible.  Right now, her pictures of wedding cake designs are giving Blogspot traffic and search rankings that should be the website’s.  Consider using video on the blog, in addition to the pictures for maximum visibility. A custom cake (wedding primarily) creator, Lisa did a great job with her 4-month-old site with geo-tagging in her meta descriptions and page titles.  (I’ve done seven during my marketing career) is a painful and much-lengthier process than any website development company will tell you.   This prospect wanted to wait for the budget, then the redesign, and  finally, the launch before turning to lead generation tactics for their business.  All because some internal folks didn’t like the “look” of their existing website. Is that a smart marketing move? One of HubSpot’s top Inbound Marketing Specialists asked me to join a sales call in an effort to show the prospect that waiting for a website redesign, instead of concentrating on building relevant content for their site with keyword-rich, consistent copy points, was putting the cart before the horse.  They did not have – and were unlikely to get in the relatively near-term – budget approval to proceed for a complete overhaul of their site.  Yet, they were persistent in their belief that the new site would solve all of their lead generation problems.  Baloney! During yesterday’s 1. With “blended” results occuring as search continues to evolve, this site would benefit from having a social media presence.  Using the help of community that is part of the Center for Strategic Planning’s world, their content is a perfect way to utilize Twitter and Facebook. 1. Use Google Local and Google Street Maps to get found geographically.  Even without a storefront, being found online is critical when looking for brides in a specific geographic area. URL: cssp.com | Grader Score: 98  3. Increase your authority on search engines by executing a 301 redirect on the sweetgrace.net to www.sweetgrace.net.  Right now, there are two sites in the eyes of Google and the diluted effect is hurting rankings. Suggestions for optimization: 4. Their domain is set to expire in less than a year.  Get it renewed for another 5 or 10 years and do it quickly. Date & Time: What do you think these sites could have done differently?  Do you agree that design is not the most important factor in website effectiveness? Website Optimization Webinar  for optimization by HubSpot experts! (3-5 will be selected) 2. Create single Twitter and Facebook accounts for Tiger Turf World.  She has not grabbed thelast_img read more

Finding Blue Ocean Keywords: A Fresh Look At The Long Tail

first_img Whether the notion of the “long tail” resonates with you or this idea of “blue ocean” keywords works, the key to attracting more free traffic to your site from search engines is to create more great content on your site than your competitors do.  Focusing less on the most common or obvious keywords and more on carving out your own unique set terms will likely result in faster and better results. keyword research It occurred to me that applying the essence of their theory to your or In Kim and Mauborgne’s metaphor, a red ocean represents existing and competitive industries where lots and lots of people are fighting for limited market share; picture sharks in a feeding frenzy.  A blue ocean represents new industries where opportunity is abundant and competition is non-existent; picture the clear, blue ocean water. “business consulting” “consultants” “consulting” A few years ago we posted an I created a spreadsheet (represented above) of about 1500 keywords that we track (presuming they are all reasonably relevant).  Then, based on the intensity of competition for each keyword, I applied a gradient with blue being applied to those keywords with little or no competition and red being applied to those with steep competition.  The result is a pretty cool visual representation of which keywords would likely deliver the quickest and most qualified results. .  They are easy to identify and they are attractive because lots and lots of people tend to search for them.  To actually generate organic traffic from them, however, is incredibly difficult, if not impossible, for most companies; there is just way too much competition. Typically, these “red ocean” keywords are also very expensive if you were to consider buying them as part of a paid search campaign.  As it turns out, these popular search terms are also rather vague and are less likely to send high quality traffic your way.  In general, Kim and Mauborgne would recommend against spending any time competing for those terms on the right. , Keyword Research strategy could open up a sea, if you will, of opportunity. Keywords farthest to the right represent those that are common or most obvious.  For a consulting company, examples might be by W. Chan Kim and Renee Mauborgne.  Essentially, the book encourages entrepreneurs to think differently about their business plans.  Instead of entering an existing industry and fighting for market share, create a brand new industry.  Instead of working hard to beat the competition, eliminate it.  Blue Ocean Keywords Topics: Red Ocean Keywords Keywords on the left, on the other hand, represent creative, outside-the-box keywords that differentiate a product or service from the masses.  Using the same fictional consulting company as above, examples of “blue ocean” keywords might be “small business IT consulting”, “small business network implementation” or “IT consulting company Cambridge, MA”.  These types of “long tail” terms are searched for less frequently, but they are more specific and therefore will bring more qualified traffic to your site.  There are also far fewer sharks in the water.  That “blue ocean” on the left – and even in the middle- is where the greatest opportunity lives and the list is endless.  What you see in the image above is just an illustration to make a point.  Blue ocean keywords are innumerable, all you need to do to take advantage of this opportunity it create the content.  Publishing often and writing relevant content will result in increased (and qualified) traffic form search engines.  And, if you are just getting started and you are considering jumpstarting your efforts with a paid search campaign, blue ocean keywords are usually far less expensive. article inspired by the book “Blue Ocean Strategy” Originally published Oct 27, 2010 8:00:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

The Ultimate Glossary of Performance Metrics Every Marketer Should Know

first_img 19) Landing Page Bounce Rate – Think of this number as the flip side to your landing page conversion rate — it describes the percentage of people that visit your landing page and then immediately leave. If your bounce rate is high, you might need to better align the offer on the page with the language on the landing page, or come up with a more enticing offer. Email & Lead Nurturing 20) Database Size – This is the number of email addresses in your database that you can email. It is incredibly important that you work at increasing this number over time, as your email database expires at a rate of about 25% per year. So if your database size is staying flat, it’s actually shrinking. 21) Email Opt-Out Rate – Your email opt-out rate, also known as your email unsubscribe rate, is the rate at which people select to not receive your emails anymore by clicking the “Unsubscribe” link in your emails. If this number is relatively high, meaning over >5%, take steps to better segment your email list by things like demographic information, company size, pain points — whatever is appropriate for your business. This allows you to execute smaller, more targeted email sends that offer more value to subscribers. 22) Delivery Rate – This tells you the percentage of your database that actually received your email in their inbox. A low delivery rate could be a sign that you have a low Sender Score . 15) Links per Page – A specific web page that has a high quantity of inbound links has a better likelihood of ranking in search. Is there a specific page or blog post that’s generated a lot of links? Perhaps you should make more content of that type! Landing Pages and Lead Conversion 16) CTA Conversion Rate – CTA stands for call-to-action, of course. Track the percentage of people who visited a particular page who also clicked a CTA on that page. It indicates the appeal of the offer, whether the CTA is well-crafted and written, and if it has good placement on the page. 8) Social Clicks – Measure the number of clicks you receive for the links you’re posting in your social media updates. This is a good way to gauge how interesting your network finds your content, how well it’s positioned, and how engaged your audience is. 9) Retweets & Shares – When people really love your content, they share it with their own networks. Is your content being shared socially throughout the web? Track it through retweets and shares. 10) Like & +1 Count – Everyone likes to be liked! This metric tells you how many people like your content by clicking a “Like” button on Facebook, or “+1” button on Google+. 11) Percent Engaged – Time to get geeky. Of your entire possible network (your friends, and your friends’ friends), what percent is engaging with (meaning clicking, commenting on, or liking) your content? This is a good metric to understand whether people are paying attention to your content. Originally published Apr 26, 2012 2:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 13) Visits per Keyword – This metrics tells you how much traffic a keyword drives to your website from organic search. This will be a symptom of how often people search for that keyword and how well you rank for the keyword. 14) Leads per Keyword – This number tells you how well the traffic you generate from a given keyword converts into leads for your business. If a specific keyword and page is driving a lot of visits but not leads, perhaps you need to optimize the CTAs on that page to increase lead conversions. 27) Branded Search Traffic – Very similar to direct traffic, branded search traffic is the amount of traffic that came to your site as a result of a visitor Googling your company’s name, most likely because they recently “heard” of you and wanted to learn more. 23) Email Open Rate – This metric tells you what percentage of the people who received your email opened it. If you had a strong subject line and the receiver recognizes your company (or the person who sent the email), you should see a higher open rate. Yipee! 24) Click-Through Rate – Your email CTR tracks the percentage of people who received your email, and clicked a link within that email. Use this metric to understand how valuable the offer you sent was, or how well your link was positioned. 25) Campaign Conversion Rate – This metric indicates the rate at which people who received your email converted into a lead. You can use it to gauge the success of your email campaign compared to past sends. A high campaign conversion rate is the result of a targeted send with a great offer. Public Relations & Branding 26) Direct Traffic – Direct traffic is the amount of traffic coming to your site as a result of people typing in www.yourcompany.com into their browser. Measuring how much traffic comes to your site in this manner helps you gauge the effectiveness of your PR efforts. Topics: 3) Views per Post – How many views does a particular blog post earn? Use this metric to compare posts. Does one post type get more views than others — list posts , for example? Learn from your successes, and use this metric to create more content that your readers enjoy. 4) Post Views per Contributor – Nothing like stirring up a little competition among your employees, right? If there is a certain author who receives more views on average than other authors, dig in to learn why. Is it because he has a larger social media following to promote his blog post to? Is it because she wrote about a topic that garners more attention? Use this metric to generate some friendly rivalry that helps increase content quality. 5) Blog Post Comments – Comments are a good sign of how engaging your blog post is. You can also encourage conversation by asking an intriguing question at the end of your posts to help stir up debate. 6) Links per Post – Blogging is a critical component of any SEO strategy. Companies who blog get substantially more inbound links than those that do not . Look at which posts generate more inbound links, learn, and repeat. Social Media 7) Followers & Reach – Some marketers think of their social database like their email database. What is the total count of individuals that your business can reach through social channels? How does that reach change over time? Hopefully that graph is up and to the right.center_img Marketing Metrics 31) Customers Generated – Ahh, the bottom line. If you aren’t tracking customers earned, how do you know how valuable your leads are? Use closed-loop analytics to determine which channels generate leads that turn into customers. 32) Sales Cycle Length – Do you know how long it takes for a new lead to turn into a customer? Track this and monitor how it changes over time so your sales team can prioritize their funnel, and marketing can generate more leads that convert in a shorter time span.This mega list should be helpful when determining how all the different facets of your marketing are performing. When creating a data-driven marketing team, consider using tools to manage your reporting . Ultimately, you’ll be making smart, data-driven decisions and your marketing will be better for it. What other helpful metrics do you look at that aren’t mentioned here? Image credit: Horia Varlan 28) Visits From Guest Blog Posts and Media Placements – Was a killer guest article written by your company recently placed on a business or online trade publication? How many visitors did it send to your website? Use that as your metric for success! Overall Funnel Metrics 29) Site Visits – Measure overall visitors to your website from all channels — email marketing, social media, organic search, the works. This metric tells you how good your marketing team is at driving traffic to your website. 30) Leads Generated – Are you meeting your leads goal? Are your sales reps’ funnels nice and full? Track leads generated month-to-month, as well as number of leads generated per channel, like you see below. 17) Offer Redemption – Offers come in the form of webinars, ebooks, buyers’ guides, and the like. When you launch a new offer, how many people download it? Or if it’s a webinar, how many people register? 18) Landing Page Conversion Rate – This metric is extremely important and determines your effectiveness at converting visitors into leads. Track the percentage of people who land on your page and then fill out the form. If it’s low, you have an opportunity to do some A/B testing to increase conversions. SEO 12) Keyword Rankings – These rankings tell you for which keywords you rank very well, poorly, or somewhere in between. You can also watch how your rankings change for these keywords over time to ensure you don’t slip on important keywords. But be careful not to get caught in the weeds — measure the traffic and leads generated by those ranking keywords, too! Good marketers live by their data. Why? Metrics help us set goals and track progress, and numbers confirm we did a good job. Marketers should have control of their own data, as well as determine what metrics they might need to track before starting any new campaign. By digging into results, we can understand what worked well, what didn’t work well, and then learn from it.Now be strong, you data-driven marketer , you! Jump into this, the most comprehensive metrics and analytics glossary we’ve ever written. After reading this article, you will have earned your own data geek super hero cape. Content 1) Blog Traffic – We all want to know how many people are visiting our blog day-to-day or month-to-month. This metric is the total number of people who are viewing your blog content. Is that number changing over time? What is the month-to-month growth rate? That’s a great measurement to gauge content success! 2) Blog Subscribers – The number of people who are subscribing to your blog (via RSS or email) is an indicator of the value of your content. If they appreciate what you’re writing, they will subscribe to get more. Watch how this number grows over time. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Awards Season is Here! Help HubSpot Pick the Nonprofit of the Year

first_imgAs reported by Network for Good, 30% of annual online giving will occur this month and 10% will occur the last three days of the year. In the spirit of the biggest and most exciting month for nonprofits, the HubSpot Nonprofit Program is excited to announce our first annual “Nonprofit of the Year” award nominations!The organizations on this year’s list are all small nonprofits nominated by HubSpotters, and we’d love your voting participation.Voting will be open to over a million of our social followers until December 22, and the winning organization will be granted a free one-year subscription to our Nonprofit Advantage product, so that we can do the inbound marketing work for them!There are thousands more NPOs that we’d put on this list if we could. We are so inspired by the amazing work these organizations all do each and every day. Click to see the 2013 nominees and help us pick the winner!As a part of Nonprofit of the Year nominee announcement, we’ve included our favorite highlights from Charity Navigator’s Top 10 Best Practices of Savvy Donors, along with our own commentary on each recommendation:1) Be proactive in your giving.Charity Navigator says:Smart givers generally don’t give reactively in a knee-jerk fashion. They don’t respond to the first organization that appeals for help. They take the time to identify which causes are most important to their families, and they are specific about the change they want to affect.For example, they don’t just support generic cancer charities, but instead have targeted goals for their giving, such as providing mammograms to at-risk women.HubSpot’s take:Nonprofits that are making it easy for prospective donors to gather information through the natural course of research will win the hearts and support of today’s giving community, especially the newest group of donors: Millennials.2) Hang up the phone and eliminate the middleman.Charity Navigator says:Informed donors recognize that for-profit fundraisers, those often used in charitable telemarketing campaigns, keep a large portion (in some cases all) of each dollar they collect.Wise donors never give out their personal information — like credit card accounts and Social Security numbers — over the phone. If they like what they hear in the pitch, they’ll hang up, investigate the charity online, and send their contribution directly to the charity, thereby cutting out the middleman and ensuring 100% of their donation reaches the charity.Taking it a step further, donors may want to reconsider supporting a charity that uses an inefficient telemarketing approach and instead identify a charity that does not use telemarketing to raise funds. HubSpot’s take:One of the least efficient ways to market is via phone. As donors, we all want to know that the lion’s share of our donation dollars are going straight to the field. This is why it is so easy to feel confident about supporting organizations that practice inbound fundraising.When a nonprofit attracts donors online (organically), that nonprofit is able to shrink its operating budget and spend the rest directly on their mission. 3) Check the charity’s commitment to accountability and transparency.Charity Navigator says:In 2011, Charity Navigator added an Accountability & Transparency dimension to its rating system. It tracks metrics such as whether the charity uses an objective process to determine their CEO’s salary, has an effective governance structure, and has a whistleblower policy.This data is critical because charities that follow good governance and transparency practices are less likely to engage in unethical or irresponsible activities. So, the risk that such charities would misuse donations is lower than for charities that don’t adopt such practicesHubSpot’s take:One of the great things about nonprofit websites and an inbound mentality is that there are no barriers. It’s not about how much money the nonprofit spends disseminating reports to constituents, but about how accessible it for them to search and find. Transparency is easy and free.What tips do you have to share? What do you look for in an organization that you choose to support? Tell us below, and be sure to vote for the Nonprofit of the Year! Originally published Dec 18, 2013 6:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Nonprofit Marketing Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Two Critical Metrics for Measuring Your Fundraising Performance

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Apr 3, 2014 11:30:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Marketing Metrics I believe that performance measurement is the most important tool in every nonprofit’s fundraising toolbox. In order to improve the outcomes of your fundraising efforts, you need to measure performance, analyze results, and improve performance over time. But this begs the question … What should your organization measure?Well, it depends on your fundraising goals and strategies. Measurement should always be determined by your unique fundraising plan and the validation you need to improve your fundraising performance. This may include measuring the performance of your marketing channels like your website, social media engagement, and direct mail performance, as well as other efforts like special events, peer-to-peer fundraising, and major gift fundraising performance.However, underlying all of these channels, efforts, and activities are two metrics that lay a foundation for fundraising performance measurement: return on investment and cost per dollar raised.These two metrics are powerful because they allow us to start answering some very intriguing questions, like:We raised “X” dollars from this fundraising strategy, but what does that mean?  Was that fundraising strategy more or less effective than the same strategy last year?How does the performance of that fundraising strategy compare to our other strategies?  More importantly, we can answer strategic questions that drive fundraising improvement and growth. The most critical of these strategic questions are: Are we raising money or losing money? and How do we know if we are raising money or losing money?FundamentalsReturn on investment and cost per dollar raised can be calculated from two variables: revenue by strategy and expenses by strategy.Return on investment is the amount of revenue you generate for a given strategy divided by the expenses required to generate that revenue. Return on investment calculates the total yield for every dollar expended to produce that yield. If the outcome of this calculation is greater than one, the strategy produced a return. If the outcome of this calculation is less than one, the strategy produced a loss.    Cost per dollar raised is the inverse of return on investment. Cost per dollar raised is the total expenses allocated to a certain strategy divided by the total revenue generated by that strategy (revenue could also be replaced with “raised” funds to alter the focus of the metric). As opposed to return on investment, cost per dollar raised calculates the total cost to yield a single dollar of revenue. If the outcome of this calculation is greater than one, the strategy produced a loss; and if the outcome of the calculation is less than one, the strategy produced a return.In order to calculate these two metrics, we need two things: an aggregate sum of all revenue generated for the strategy we want to measure, as well as an aggregate sum of all expenses for that strategy. The “strategy” is the specific fundraising effort, activity, or tactic. You can be specific or broad in how you bucket revenue and expenses under a strategy, but with both metric calculations you must use a ratio of revenue and expenses that are associated with the same strategy.If we measure revenue and expenses for each strategy, we can improve return on investment and cost per dollar raised performance by improving each variable in the calculation. There are three scenarios that lead to increased performance in these two metrics:While holding expenses constant, we increase revenue.While holding revenue constant, we decrease expenses.We increase revenue and decrease expenses at the same time.Key PointsIn addition to the fundamentals of these two metrics, there are three key points that can improve the accuracy and value of your measurements.1) Filter down to the micro-level.While you can generate return on investment and cost per dollar raised for annual fundraising performance on the macro-level, both metrics become more valuable as you evaluate performance on the micro-level.Tracking and calculating performance for these metrics on the micro-level requires a segmented fundraising plan with specific and discrete strategies. Filtering your strategies down to the sources, channels, and methods of fundraising you employ makes it easier to find the weak points in your strategy and make changes to improve your fundraising performance. When you run these metrics in a macro view, it’s challenging to determine where improvements can be made. Specific micro-level segments allow you to pinpoint exactly which strategies and tactics are effective, and which ones aren’t.  2) Collaborate across the organization.For most organizations (dependent on your organizational setup), your development staff and your finance and accounting staff must work together to produce these metrics. Generally the development staff will have data on the sources of revenue and can attribute revenue to specific fundraising strategies, while the finance and accounting staff will have data on the expenses and can attribute those expenses to specific fundraising strategies.As a result, it’s important that these two functions collaborate to produce these metrics. It’s also important that both functions track revenue and expenses using the same specificity and granularity. Without clearly defined tracking and coding of revenue and expenses across both functions, you cannot generate accurate or relevant ratios for these two metrics. 3) Track time and apply as an expense.Including time in your return on investment and cost per dollar raised metrics is a “game changer.” If you’ve been tracking return on investment and cost per dollar raised for your fundraising strategies, but haven’t been adding time as a part of the expenses variable, try running your metrics again including time.It’s very easy to think about time as a free resource, but we all know time is a scarce resource and is therefore valuable to your organization. Time is a direct expense. If it takes one hundred hours of prep for your development director to plan and coordinate a special event, there is a cost for that time. The direct cost of time will depend on who expended the time, how it was expended, and how your organization values that time.Time is also an opportunity. Depending on how time is spent, there could be more valuable uses of time that generate higher returns for the organization. Adding time to your measurement of return on investment and cost per dollar raised gives you a true measure of fundraising performance.Practical Tip: Try tracking time for specific fundraising strategies. Start out with an isolated experiment of one or two strategies. Use a time tracking software like Harvest, RescueTime, TSheets, or Toggl; or keep track of your time in an Excel spreadsheet. Then calculate return on investment and cost per dollar raised two ways. Calculate one set of these two metrics with time included as an expense (valued at a particular rate) and one set without time included. The difference should be evident.Take Action How do we put these metrics into practice? How do we apply them to real-life scenarios, and actually use them to improve fundraising performance?1) Invest in what works; put fundraising dollars toward effective strategies.Fundraising budgets have limits. There isn’t an endless pool of funds to invest. As a result, we need to be selective, strategic, and smart in where we invest our fundraising dollars.Where should we spend our fundraising dollars to generate the highest return? If you use specific, granular details on the micro level of your fundraising strategy to calculate return on investment and cost per dollar raised, you can identify the best fundraising opportunities. Identifying effective opportunities can focus your organization on shedding waste (which are those activities that don’t produce a return) and investing in value (which are those activities that do produce a return).In addition, both of these measures allow us to create “baseline” metrics. Baseline metrics are comparable across incomparable strategies. For example, you can compare the returns from your direct mail campaign to the returns from your special event using these metrics. You can also compare the returns from your social media efforts to your major gift personal solicitations. If we base our comparisons on revenue or expenses by themselves, we cannot compare unlike fundraising strategies. However, as a ratio we can compare these strategies to uncover those that are most effective. Note: While a particular strategy may be highly effective based on these measures, it may not scale. For example, you may find that your event is less effective than a direct mail campaign, but the event’s scale cannot be matched by your direct mail efforts. Scale is an important factor to consider when investing in effective strategies. The correlation between scale and effectiveness, as it pertains to developing a cohesive fundraising strategy, is an important consideration when deciding how to invest limited fundraising dollars to produce maximum return. 2) Test and experiment; test smart, learn, and adapt.It’s important to remember that if you’re measuring these metrics for the first time (especially if you include time in your expense calculations, which I highly recommend), the results may be enlightening or shocking. Something you thought was high performing may be generating poor performance. This is why it’s important to test strategies, evaluate the effectiveness of each strategy, and learn.  However, testing and experimenting have limits. Again, our budgets aren’t infinite. We need to be smart in our testing approach. Jim Collins states it best in his book Great by Choice, “fire bullets then cannonballs.”Because time and money are scarce and valuable, Collins uses this premise as a method to validate strategies and learn. “A bullet is a low-cost, low-risk, and low-distraction test or experiment. Based on empirical validation that the bullets are hitting their mark, then concentrate resources on a calibrated cannonball. Calibrated cannonballs enable large returns from concentrated investments.”Don’t waste resources by firing uncalibrated cannonballs when you don’t know if you will actually hit your target. Test and experiment by firing bullets until you feel confident you’ve fine-tuned your methods. Then fire a cannonball when you’re confident you’ve dialed in performance with the right specifications to make the biggest impact. You can use return on investment and cost per dollar raised to validate your strategies and then scale those strategies into larger fundraising efforts once they’re proven. 3) Turn the dial up; improve the return of each fundraising strategy.Lastly, with these metrics you can improve performance. If you understand the drivers that affect these two metrics, you can “crank up” the return on each fundraising activity by improving similar fundraising strategies over time.For example, if you run the same event every year and calculate the yield of that event based on the return on investment and cost per dollar raised, you can strategically improve performance for that event in the upcoming year. Employ the three scenarios described earlier:Increase event revenues while holding expenses constant.Decrease event expenses while holding revenues constant.Increase event revenues and decrease event expenses at the same time.If you can improve any one of these scenarios, you can yield higher returns for the upcoming event than the past event. The fundamentals of these two metrics allow you to squeeze more value from your fundraising efforts to generate more return with less cost, while contributing to your organization’s year-over-year growth.These aren’t the only metrics you should be tracking, but they can get you started. The goal of any development professional is to invest in positive fundraising projects. Fundraising success is directly correlated to managing a portfolio of projects that yield positive returns as standalone efforts and as a total, combined portfolio of fundraising projects. By measuring a spectrum of macro- and micro-level returns using these two measures, you have a litmus test for whether your fundraising strategy is contributing positively to the growth of your organization. Topics:last_img read more